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Grieving For Food


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50 replies to this topic

#31 connole1056

 
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Posted 09 June 2005 - 05:53 PM

Shelia, I have found that it is very difficult to find good tasting gluten-free foods without spending lots of money! My daughter hates almost everything from EnerG, especially the rice bread. However, she LOVES Food for Life rice bread. Lately though, we have noticed it has been quite crumbly. She also likes homemade rice bread.
As for pasta, if you do not take it off the heat at the exact second it is cooked it turns to mush. I think the corn pastas are really mushy, but the rice and rice/corn blends come out fine. It does taste disgusting at first. I think much of it goes away after a time on the gluten-free diet though.My dog will not eat any gluten-free food either, so I laughed when I read that!
My daughter was just in the supermarket with me complaining that she was sick of being a celiac and not being able to grab and eat anything. She says I gave it to her because of my Irish ancestory! Anyway, she was venting. I mention it because you had mentioned venting too! Everyone does, not just about gluten-free food either.
She does love the Pamela's cookies though. Someone had mentioned hating them. Unfortunately, you will have to spend your time and money finding what you do like. But, you will be healthy and that is what's important!!
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#32 frenchiemama

 
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Posted 10 June 2005 - 05:22 AM

The only gluten-free bread I will ever buy again is Grandma Ferdon's egg bread. I wasted so much money on absolute crap before I tried this stuff. Even my husband said it was good.

Depending on where you are shipping can be a real PITA, but if you happen to be in the upper midwest it's reasonable.

www.grandmaferdons.com

If you decide to order anything, you MUST try those cinnamon rolls. They are so good.
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Carolyn


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#33 dogear

 
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Posted 10 June 2005 - 12:12 PM

I'm sure, I'm going to be in the minority here big time, but I LOVE Ener-G white rice bread. In fact, having traveled around the world in my pre-gluten-free days, I think Ener-G is the best bread, I have ever come across by lightyears.

But knowing about the corn bread and the adadema corn bread is a good idea, because it would be a better way to avoid questions and prying eyes. I just wonder when sorghum bread will become widely available!

Another nice thing is the navy bean pasta.

As for pizza. Well we all know that the crust was never the point, if you will. Don't we?

(Of course, you might not want to trust the words of somebody who loves Ener-G bread more than any other, so try it yourself.)

I've been gluten-free since about Sept 2004, but I've already come to regard the various gluten-free versions of things as the "real deal" and the gluten containing versions as the cheap, crappy, and disgusting imitations.
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#34 Sheely

 
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Posted 10 June 2005 - 01:23 PM

I also use my breadmaker to make my own bread. Nothing complicated, I toss the few ingredients in and press start (I'm not a cook). :)

I am not a great cook either, it's just something that I never got deeply into. I don't have a clue how to use a bread maker, but I am considering getting one, since this disease is going to be with me forever. Are they hard to use? Any brands that you would recommend? Will the process be different since you have to use gluten-free flour?

Thanks,!

Sheila
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#35 gZimmiZ

 
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Posted 10 June 2005 - 05:02 PM

As I read the replys I just laugh, I have been there, searching and tasting everything and more often than not being disappointed for my gluten-free family.
With that said, I purchased a Zojirushi 2lb bread maker online from WalMart and make Manna from Anna. You set the setting on medium crust, one rise time and remove it immediatley with finished to cool on a rack. WE aren't lucky enough to have a fresh bakery close so mail order almost everything and bake it. Kinnikinnick buns are good, they agree that using lettuce as a bun is yummy but at a party using a bun makes you like everyone else, remember to toast the bread, always! I also use Kinnikinnick bread and bun mix, pizza crust, english muffins and bagels. We are looking for a cracker like ritz, the only ones they like are sun diamond but a variety would be nice.
The best cookie so far is Million Dollar Peanut Butter: l cup peanut butter, l cup white sugar, 1 egg, 1 tsp baking soda, Roll into balls, roll in sugar, place on pan score with sugar coated fork.Yield: 24 cookies, Bake 350, 10 minutes or until lightly brown.
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#36 Guest_imsohungry_*

 
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Posted 11 June 2005 - 03:13 PM

Hey Sheila,
I'm not sure what make/model my breadmaker is...it was a gift from my mom when I was diagnosed...I'm sure it is a basic model though, because I figured out how to work it! :P I put my "basic" recipe below. Good luck to you! ;)

Basic white bread (has wheat bread consistency though)

1 cup water
1 1/2 TBsp butter or Spectrum (gluten-free/non-dairy)
1 TB sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp yeast
For "flour"- 2 sifted Cups of gluten-free flour mix, add 1 tsp. xan-gum, 1 tsp. unflav. gelatin


This was simple, quick, and GOOD!

(I used Bob's Red Mill gluten-free flour mix, and whatever gluten-free unflav. gelatin that I found on the Jello aisle). Side note: This makes a 1 lb. loaf for bread machines

Enjoy! -Julie B)
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#37 Guest_BellyTimber_*

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 07:23 AM

:D

In the UK two or three makes of bread making machine are well suited to gluten-free dough, it is something to do with how sticky it gets so the motor has to be strong enough. Mine is the cheapest, not much above £20 ($35 ?) (Cookworks from Argos)

if you do a "search" of this forum you can probably find an old thread on these machines.

Some also have particular programs that are of extra usefulness.

Mine is entertaining, it makes interesting noisesand has a window in the top I can't see anything through! The results equalled the best of the shop gluten-free loaves and far exceeded most shop ones.

I hate ordinary bread making as I hate getting my fingers and hands messy.

I go around with bags of "bombay mix" and dried fruit in my baggage and snap up "onion bhajis" whenever I see them (checking labels).

A friend brings bags of Reeses from US trips (I think the plainer chocolates here are good but once it gets complex, foreign ones - incl U.S. - are better).

Planning ahead is a good strategy, always.

An interesting question is:

What is and was the biggest intimacy in your life?

In a couple of dimensions the answer no doubt is:

- mentally - one's own emotions and thought patterns

- bodily - wheat and gluten - several times a day, almost every days of one's life beyond the first year (or less?), copious quantities

It's no wonder one has feelings about the change!!!

Carry on doing things you could do before and still can do - enjoy those fabulous spring cabbages. the water you cook them in, when cooled a little is a wonderful drink!!!
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#38 Guest_BellyTimber_*

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 07:38 AM

:)

Couple more thoughts on baking -

- I use the instruction book of the machine, substituting flours as advised here and elsewhere PLUS a gluten-free bread machine baking book PLUS the recipes on flour and mix bag sides. I usually mix the recipes which is exactly what is NOT recommended but then when I'm in the right mood I can be both placid and adventurous (and have only myself as an appreciative public) which is probably quite a good combination to gain experience. Enquire after good books for you to follow. Often you just have about four dry ingredients, a couple of liquids, try to mix what needs mixing, fairly well, and just layer the ingredients in the machine, usually the liquid at the bottom.

- Don't start too late in the day as you'll be too curious and stay up all night! Mostly it will need to cool and rest both inside the machine then outside.

- If it turns out funny it will still be wholesome to make cheesecake base, crumble topping, bread&butter pudding etc. :P

_When I have soggy gluten-free bread I make a warm sandwich in my Philips toasted sandwich maker.

- Consult those more experienced than me! Experienced doesn't mean complicated.

Wishing you Good Food ...
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#39 westiepaws

 
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Posted 15 June 2005 - 06:36 AM

The best chocolate chips I have EVER eaten, pre- or post-celiac are called

Enjoy Life Chocolate Chips

They are also soy-free and dairy-free (I have multiple food allergies -- it was hard for me to say goodbye to cheesecake and chocolate eclairs).

I am a newbie and have only ordered them through the online Gluten-Free Mall. You might be able to order them direct from the company. Warning, when I discovered them I ate a bag of them over a 24-hour period. Right out of the sack! They are yum-ola.

westiepaws.
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#40 Guest_BERNESES_*

 
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Posted 15 June 2005 - 03:18 PM

I was thinking about what someone said here- that you don't necessarily need to look for gluten-free substitutes for your favorite things- I'm the one who thinks Pamela's cookies taste like chalk- but to start experimenting and trying new things that are gluten free naturally. What great advice! So yesterday I made peanut butter cookies which require no flour and just threw chocolate chips in them and voila....YUM! Now normally before I would have made chocolate chip cookies and been happy but now, since I'm gluten-free, I got creative enough (for me ;) to put my two favorite things together and I like them even better.

On a gluten-free substitution note, tonight I made Tinkyada penne pasta with prosciutto, garlic, olive oil, basil, thyme, mushrooms, asparagus and gorgonzola cheese. It was HEAVENLY! And yes- had I not known that Tinkyada was rice pasta, I NEVER would have guessed. It rocks!

Also, last night I took Chebe pizza dough (the smaller ones called "Chebe on the Go") and put olive oil, mushrooms, garlic and gorgonzola on it (I'm on a gorgonzola kick now that I can tolerate lactose again) and it was like my favorite pizza at the Flatbread Company. The Chebe on the Go doughs are much thicker and softer than the bigger ones. They are awesome!

I've just realized it's a learning curve and it takes time. When I first went gluten-free I bought gluten-free bread and cookies etc just becauise they were gluten-free. Some of it was horrible, but some of it is really good. It just takes time to figure out what you like. And this board is such a good place to get support, advice and feedback. Hang in there, it takes time!
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#41 moving on

 
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Posted 15 June 2005 - 03:53 PM

Sheely, I used a bread machine for many years before going gluten free. I now use a kitchen aid to mix my bread and don't see the need for a bread machine. gluten-free bread ismuch easier to make than a dough that needs kneading. With practice, you will soon make much better bread than you will find in most places. Play around with different flours and mixes. I use sorghum, potato flour, tapioca and bean flour. Carol Fenster has a web site with suggestions and a recipes. Give yourself time to forget some tastes and also time to learn to make your own. Things get better and new products are being developed at an amazing rate. Experiment and you will soon be very excited with what you create. Look ahead = it will get better.
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#42 whimsygirl

 
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Posted 17 June 2005 - 12:59 PM

Okay I have to ask a question. How is it that everyone is seeming to be able to fit the added expense of the specialty gluten-free foods into their budget? I have found some things mainstream that are gluten-free, but not enough for everyday. I used to like going to the grocery store and liked to cook and loved to bake. And my family LOVED for me to do so. Now I get very frustrated and crabby when I'm at the grocery store I can't think of enough things to buy for meals for a family of five(when only one is diag. celiac). There is a place across town to get some gluten-free stuff but it is expensive and I can't afford much of the added expense. And let me tell you if we run out of gluten-free pancake mix my family sees no problem in using mine! :angry: When I make gluten-free brownies they eat them as fast as they are done then there is no more gluten-free, just regular. :( I can't keep up and can't seem to afford this. :blink: HOW is EVERYONE else out there doing it?
Cheree'
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#43 Guest_BERNESES_*

 
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Posted 17 June 2005 - 01:08 PM

WhimsyGirl- That would make me very angry too. My husband always asks before he eats anything that was bought specifically because it was gluten-free (we don't have kids yet). I don'y buy too much stuff just because it's gluten-free but I was never a big pasta, bread person. We eat a lot of chicken, veggies etc. The only thyings that I buy specifically gluten-free are pizza crust (because it's nice to have a pizza once in awhile), bread (but I don't eat a ton of bread anyway) and crackers (I love those but my husband doesn't really eat crackers.

Other than that, I usually eat peanut butter and jelly on rice cakes for breakfast, leftovers from the previous night's dinner for lunch and then fish, veggies, rice, potatoes, chicken with various sauces/spices for dinner. It took me a LONG time to figure this out though (at first, I thought I had to buy stuff just because it was gluten-free)

Maybe try having a talk with your family that if stuff is marked "Mom's" they should ask before eating it.

If you have an actual diagnosis from a doctor you can also get a tax break on gluten-free food (it's here on this website but I haven't done it since I don't have the diagnosis).

Hope this helps. I don't know how old your kids are, but maybe they just don't get it.
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#44 whimsygirl

 
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Posted 17 June 2005 - 01:12 PM

Let me ask one more thing, is there anywhere where some of the tasty gluten-free foods are posted that I could print out and take with me to the store? I am winging it and have heard a few things mentioned here and there in posts but it would be handy to be able to print it out from one place. I am the penny pincher in the family too and it just freaks me out to buy a loaf of gluten-free bread or something and get it home and it's awful. It's so expensive and then just goes in the garbage.
Thanks for any advice,
Cheree'
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#45 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 17 June 2005 - 01:15 PM

I can't keep up and can't seem to afford this. :blink: HOW is EVERYONE else out there doing it?
Cheree'

I don't buy the specialty stuff. That's what I do. Meals consist of meats (turkey, chicken, beef, fish, pork), vegetables (oh, I could make a list a page long), fruit (again... page long list), naturally gluten-free grains/legumes (brown rice, white rice, corn, quinoa, millet, beans, lentils), and spices to season whatever I'm cookin'. There's practically no limit to what you can make with fresh ingredients. ;-)
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA




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