Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Short-Term Memory Problems
0

9 posts in this topic

I understand that undiagnosed celiac's can contribute to neurological problems, 'brain fog', and that undiagnosed celiac disease can be, for some people, mistaken for ADHD.

However my celiac's was triggered just a year ago by an intestinal parasite, and I only had about 5 months of illness before I was diagnosed (I'm fortunate it was so quickly uncovered).

I've been gluten-free since October, and I've only had a few accidental glutenings.

Before a year ago I had the best memory and organizational skills, in fact other people in my life always counted on my cognitive game being what it was. I was sharp.

Since my celiac's was triggered I have the WORST short-term memory.

I've burnt stuff in the oven and on the stove, if I forget my grocery list I'm lost, I forget to change loads of laundry, and I've even forgotten important appointments.

And, like I said, this is sooo unlike a year ago. Could 5 months of gluten-eating with newly triggered celiacs do that much damage? Can one glutening every 5 to 8 weeks or so be enough to continue damage? I get definite symptoms when I'm glutened, even with cc, so I don't think there are more times that I'm unaware of.

The difference is so dramatic that I don't think it's just aging (I'm only 40).

My vitamin D was borderline low, so I take D as well as a bunch of other vitamins. I exercise fairly regularly and am otherwise healthy.

Any input or help?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I understand that undiagnosed celiac's can contribute to neurological problems, 'brain fog', and that undiagnosed celiac disease can be, for some people, mistaken for ADHD.

However my celiac's was triggered just a year ago by an intestinal parasite, and I only had about 5 months of illness before I was diagnosed (I'm fortunate it was so quickly uncovered).

I've been gluten-free since October, and I've only had a few accidental glutenings.

Before a year ago I had the best memory and organizational skills, in fact other people in my life always counted on my cognitive game being what it was. I was sharp.

Since my celiac's was triggered I have the WORST short-term memory.

I've burnt stuff in the oven and on the stove, if I forget my grocery list I'm lost, I forget to change loads of laundry, and I've even forgotten important appointments.

And, like I said, this is sooo unlike a year ago. Could 5 months of gluten-eating with newly triggered celiacs do that much damage? Can one glutening every 5 to 8 weeks or so be enough to continue damage? I get definite symptoms when I'm glutened, even with cc, so I don't think there are more times that I'm unaware of.

The difference is so dramatic that I don't think it's just aging (I'm only 40).

My vitamin D was borderline low, so I take D as well as a bunch of other vitamins. I exercise fairly regularly and am otherwise healthy.

Any input or help?

From what I understand, the surgery I had in December triggered my celiac. But, I've probably had it for several years before that. I guess you could call mine "silent" celiac...I don't have the typical extreme symptoms...make sit a little more difficult i think because I'm never sure if it's gluten or other allergies (which are beginning to show up since I've been gluten free). So, I'm now keeping a food journal to track what could be causing these other issues.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have similar memory problems. They started a couple years before I went gluten-free, and progressed to not remembering the names of people I've worked with for years. I literally would speak to them in the hallway, go into my office, and look at the office telephone list to discover the name of the person I just spoke to.

Since going gluten-free my memory has gotten better, but it's not what it was. Also, a good glutening will knock short term memory out for a while and send me back to looking at the phone list on the wall, and using other crutches.

I also take Vit D (10,000 mg/day) and other doctor-monitored supplements, including 5HTP and L-Tyrosine.

So, can gluten do that much damage? I think it can. I think it did.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your autoimmunity has some neurologic component, I imagine it could affect memory. Over the years, I've learned that you have to be really strict with this diet to get the best benefits, and neuro symptoms seem to be more sensitive than GI symptoms. I used to figure a glutening every now and again was unavoidable. I went super-strict this spring and now my carpal tunnel that flared last summer when I was moving and had to eat out a lot has completely healed. I would say you need to get better control of your diet so you are not glutened every 5-8 weeks and see if the memory problems get better.

Another thing that comes to mind is B12. Be sure you're getting enough as it causes all sorts of neuro issues and all us gluten-sensitive folks tend to run deficient.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if my carpal-tunnel-like symptoms are also related to my crappy memory - since they're both seemingly neurological: my hands go numb every night, sometimes 10 times, no matter what position they are in. I think my B levels were tested when I asked my doctor to check a bunch of things including my vitamin D level (partly because of the hand numbness) - but I'll look for the labwork and check. Vitamin D supplements and sunlight haven't helped the numbness, but they did help my energy. I take magnesium here and there, but I'm going to start taking it daily.

I try very hard to avoid glutenings and cc. I think my last glutening was from 'gluten free' honey nut Chex. Sigh.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I wonder if my carpal-tunnel-like symptoms are also related to my crappy memory - since they're both seemingly neurological: my hands go numb every night, sometimes 10 times, no matter what position they are in. I think my B levels were tested when I asked my doctor to check a bunch of things including my vitamin D level (partly because of the hand numbness) - but I'll look for the labwork and check. Vitamin D supplements and sunlight haven't helped the numbness, but they did help my energy. I take magnesium here and there, but I'm going to start taking it daily.

I try very hard to avoid glutenings and cc. I think my last glutening was from 'gluten free' honey nut Chex. Sigh.

I agree that you should get some sublingual B12 supplements. B12 is one that it can take some time for the labs to show the deficiency and some of the ranges are still set too low. It is a water soluable vitamin so you can't take too much as your body will simply excrete the excess. Give the sublinguals a try for at least a couple of months.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My memory issues started 3 years ago long before the idea of gluten ever entered the picture. I believe I began Glut intolerance symptoms 30 years ago so no telling how much damage I have. My memory is completely shot. It is extremely bothersome.

Ok not sure why I responded, I wish I had something to share that would help. Or maybe I did... and I just forgot.

*sigh*

Tiff

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read that those who are intolerant to gluten may develop plaque in the brain. I'm not a doctor and I may be offbase here, but common sense would tell me that plaque on my gray matter could definitely result in brain fog, dizziness, etc.

I can't find the link, but I recall also reading that the plaque could lessen (at least) when gluten is removed from the diet. My brain fog and dizziness is better, as long as I don't ingest ANYTHING processed, even if it is gluten-free.

I really want to get my "mind like a steel trap", back.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read that those who are intolerant to gluten may develop plaque in the brain. I'm not a doctor and I may be offbase here, but common sense would tell me that plaque on my gray matter could definitely result in brain fog, dizziness, etc.

I can't find the link, but I recall also reading that the plaque could lessen (at least) when gluten is removed from the diet. My brain fog and dizziness is better, as long as I don't ingest ANYTHING processed, even if it is gluten-free.

I really want to get my "mind like a steel trap", back.

I wonder if that is what they are seeing when the MRI's show the UBO's that were found on my MRI before diagnosis. I know if some countries those lesions are diagnostic of celiac, but my neuro is clueless. I would love to have another MRI to see if those lesions are still present since most of my neuro symptoms are gone. If I ever move near to a research facility I may check with a celiac specialist there and see if they want to do another MRI on me. My brain fog and ataxia are in almost total remission now unless I get glutened and even then the ataxia is nowhere near where it was prediagnosis.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.