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Brain Fog


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#1 sherrylynn

 
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Posted 16 August 2010 - 09:50 AM

I have heard people say they had brain fog before going gluten free. and I was wondering when they say brain fog what do they mean. Is is just being absent minded. Do they feel like they are on drugs or is it like they can't think.

I have very great long term memory, but my short term memory sucks.

I took my grandson to the doctor for his shots about 6 months ago and just about a month ago my daughter wanted to know what they gave him. I honestly can not even remember taking him to the doctor. I have had a lot of memory lapses like that and it scares me. :ph34r:
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#2 mscan91

 
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Posted 16 August 2010 - 10:02 AM

Yea I know where you're coming from.

My boyfriend often gets MRSA boils and needs them surgically removed. The other day I was asking about the scars and when they all happened. He told me the one on his arm was 2 months ago... and I was there. NO memory what so ever.

And my dad told me that a few months ago he had enlisted my help to fish a frog out of our pool and we spent hours doing it. Can't remember it at all.
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#3 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 16 August 2010 - 10:09 AM

Sherry:

"Brain fog" ... it's something you know you had when it's no longer there.

It's a feeling of not not being very sharp, feeling kind of fuzzy, and generally tired.
But you know more what is was when it's no longer there.
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Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

#4 sherrylynn

 
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Posted 16 August 2010 - 10:28 AM

I also forget words several times a day. I will be talking to people at work and I can not remeber a word that I want to say. It is usually a common word like cup or stappler but I cannot rememer how to say a word.

People usually have to finish my sentence for me. That is so irritating.
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#5 Lynayah

 
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Posted 18 August 2010 - 03:03 AM

Sherry:

"Brain fog" ... it's something you know you had when it's no longer there.

It's a feeling of not not being very sharp, feeling kind of fuzzy, and generally tired.
But you know more what is was when it's no longer there.


For me it was a vague feeling for a long time, but in the year before my diagnosis, it got so bad that I'd struggle with even the most simple things.

For example:

I'd drive to somewhere I'd driven countless times, and I'd forget how to get there.

I'd work on my computer and try to preform a task that was once easy (like downloading onto my iPod), and I'd get so confused that I'd have to have my husband help me.

I'd misplace things far more often than I do now.

Because I'd forget things so easily, my sense of urgency heightened. Things like I'd find myself interrupting people as they spoke so I wouldn't forget what I wanted to say.

It's gone now, thank goodness . . . however, it does creep back a little bit (just a little) if I get glutened.

Crazy.
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Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#6 Lynayah

 
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Posted 18 August 2010 - 03:15 AM

As I sit here remembering, I've remembered a few more symptoms I had:

When I'd type, I'd make TONS MORE typos than what is normal for me. Sometimes I'd even write one completely different word when I'd mean to write another -- instead of writing "I'm going home," maybe I'd write "I'm going town."

Sometimes I'd talk the same way. It was as though I had a mini stroke (which I hadn't).

I'd forget words far more frequently, and often, it was hard to answer questions. If someone asked me "Where are the postage stamps?" I'd have to get up and show them because it was difficult for me to put the answer into words.

I had a very tough time sitting still or focusing on things for prolonged periods. Some of the way I acted mimed Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder -- back then. Now it's gone.

Years ago, I gave up knitting because it was hard for me to focus on it. Now I knit like the wind and have fallen so in love with it. (I still drop stitches, but so does everyone!) :)

It was horrible pre-gluten-free. I blamed it on age. I blamed it on stress. I blamed it on everything but gluten.

It just breaks my heart to think of all the wonderful folks out there who suffer the same way. They are walking around beating themselves up for "falling apart" and thinking they are helpless to do anything about it, when all it takes is a change of diet.

Anyway, I hope this helps clarify brain fog a little more.
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Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#7 scuzy

 
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Posted 18 August 2010 - 11:44 AM

Wow, so is it a proven symptom to have a horrible memory? I never even thought of that as a symptom. My memory used to be good, but the past few years, when all my other symptoms started it has gotten bad. I can't even remember when my friend visited me, or when a friend slept over 6 months ago, what I just heard in class.. ect... And I'm only 21...
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#8 Lynayah

 
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Posted 18 August 2010 - 06:11 PM

Wow, so is it a proven symptom to have a horrible memory? I never even thought of that as a symptom. My memory used to be good, but the past few years, when all my other symptoms started it has gotten bad. I can't even remember when my friend visited me, or when a friend slept over 6 months ago, what I just heard in class.. ect... And I'm only 21...


Scuzy,

Brain fog is very common, but with the severity you describe, you might want to ask an expert.

Just wondering: Do you have other neurological symptoms as well? Do you suffer from celiac in addition to gluten-intolerance? Have you gone through testing, etc.?
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Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#9 Lynayah

 
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Posted 18 August 2010 - 06:32 PM

Scuzy,

PS: I do not have celiac. I am HIGHLY gluten intolerant -- I am told I am more sensitive to gluten than most, including those who suffer from celiac.

I just wanted to add this info because you refer to wondering if you have celiac in your posts.

So, if you are gluten-intolerant, it doesn't necessarily mean you also have celiac disease.
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Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#10 scuzy

 
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Posted 21 August 2010 - 08:12 AM

My Celiac test came back negative, but if you read my post: http://www.celiac.co...-works-wonders/ , it explains my situation (to much typing) :). Not sure what other neurological symptoms you might be referring too. I personally always chocked up my horrible memory to having such a traumatic child hood. But then again a friend sleeping over is not traumatic, so in theory my mind should remember it, right? Thanks for your input.
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#11 CarolinaKip

 
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Posted 21 August 2010 - 09:26 AM

I also forget words several times a day. I will be talking to people at work and I can not remeber a word that I want to say. It is usually a common word like cup or stappler but I cannot rememer how to say a word.

People usually have to finish my sentence for me. That is so irritating.


I was the same way! I also couldn't think clearly, easy confused. I also would wake up in the morning and could not seem to fully wake up. My mind was "sleepy" until about noon.
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How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.
George Washington Carver


Blood work positive 4/10
Endo biopsy positive 5/10
Gluten free 5/10




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