Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Need To Keep My Rice/potato/xanthan, Etc., In Fridge?
0

11 posts in this topic

I bought all the various flours to make my own gluten-free flour mix today. I have leftovers of some starches/flours so I bagged each leftover individually and then put them all in a large ziploc. Should I store the bag of leftovers in the fridge? And especially what is he best way to store the xanthan gum? That stuff is like powdered gold at $12 for a tiny bag!!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I don't know the answer, but I just wanted to say I hope you labeled all those ziplocs. It's hard to tell all those white powders apart once you put them away. ;)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't store any of my rice flours or my xanthan gum in the fridge. Then again, I go through the flours fairly quickly. I would say it would be a good idea to store any bean flours in the freezer, as I believe that they tend to spoil faster than the others. DH doesn't like the bean flours so I quit using them. We primarily stick to rice flour (white and brown) and buckwheat.

I apply the "bread" rule of thumb to all flours, whether gluteny or not. If they're stored in a cool, dry place they'll be fine. If the temperature and humidity fluctuate a lot, you might consider storing them in the freezer, rather than the fridge. The freezer is much drier, which is better for flours in general.

I store all nuts and nut meals in the freezer at all times, because the oils in the nuts tend to go rancid fairly quickly.

Any potato, corn or tapioca starch should be okay in a cupboard as long as they're in airtight containers.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought all the various flours to make my own gluten-free flour mix today. I have leftovers of some starches/flours so I bagged each leftover individually and then put them all in a large ziploc. Should I store the bag of leftovers in the fridge? And especially what is he best way to store the xanthan gum? That stuff is like powdered gold at $12 for a tiny bag!!!

I store my xanthan gum in a cabinet by the baking powder and baking soda...no problem thus far and I'm sure I bought it a couple of years ago. Yes, it is expensive and thankfully it lasts quite awhile unless you do a lot of baking.

Certain flours should be refrigerated so they don't become rancid...I'm thinking of bean flours, brown rice flour, sorghum, etc. I don't think white rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch and those types need refrigeration to stay fresh. Someone can jump in and correct me if I'm wrong...I have a whole shelf in the fridge for flours so I'm running out of room! tongue.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought all the various flours to make my own gluten-free flour mix today. I have leftovers of some starches/flours so I bagged each leftover individually and then put them all in a large ziploc. Should I store the bag of leftovers in the fridge? And especially what is he best way to store the xanthan gum? That stuff is like powdered gold at $12 for a tiny bag!!!

I keep white rice flour, potato starch, and xanthan gum in my pantry.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Thanks soooooo much, everyone. You know, part of my problem is I don't really think about where these flours originate from. I'm so used to just working with whole wheat and I know how long that can be in the pantry before getting rancid. It makes sense that potato and tapioca would have a long shelf life but maybe not bean flours. And I don't even know what half this stuff is! What the heck is sorghum anyway??? That's rhetorical - I'll figure it out! . And when I said I bagged up each flour, I meant I put them in their original bags into ziploc baggies. Give me a little credit! 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks soooooo much, everyone. You know, part of my problem is I don't really think about where these flours originate from. I'm so used to just working with whole wheat and I know how long that can be in the pantry before getting rancid. It makes sense that potato and tapioca would have a long shelf life but maybe not bean flours. And I don't even know what half this stuff is! What the heck is sorghum anyway??? That's rhetorical - I'll figure it out! . And when I said I bagged up each flour, I meant I put them in their original bags into ziploc baggies. Give me a little credit! 

I'm still learning about all these flours, too. I sorta went crazy buying gluten free flours after I was diagnosed. I'm sure I'll eventually settle on a few I really like and cut down the number of flours I have on hand. Sure would like to free up some room in my fridge. For instance, I think I prefer buckwheat flour over sorghum and probably won't replace the sorghum when it's gone.

Just out of curiosity, what kind of a flour blend did you come up with that you mixed up in bulk? Do you have a recipe? I'm still searching and trying new recipes. Gluten free baking is a real challenge.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought all the various flours to make my own gluten-free flour mix today. I have leftovers of some starches/flours so I bagged each leftover individually and then put them all in a large ziploc. Should I store the bag of leftovers in the fridge? And especially what is he best way to store the xanthan gum? That stuff is like powdered gold at $12 for a tiny bag!!!

I travel in a motorhome part of the year, and when on the road I store most flours in a 2nd small refrigerator, with the exception of white rice flour and xantham/guar gum. The rice flour and xanthan gum are kept in air tight glass containers under the sink cupboards. They are just fine, and I think some of the gum is about 2 years old.

When we get home this fall, a small chest type freezer is on my wish list for my stuff, that way the refrigerator in the house will have "his" food and "my" food will be kept in a freezer in the garage.

Nuts do get rancid, but I buy them in small amounts in bulk so it doesn't bother me to throw them away. Chocolate chips/baking chocolate also goes rancid. I use the chips anyway and the cookies taste just fine.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sa1937, my flour mix is a recipe out of "Artisinal Gluten Free Cooking" by the Bronskis. I used it to make pancakes today and was shocked at how good they were. I mentioned the book in a different post. They truly did not taste gluten-free. I can't say they actually tasted like wheat, but they were much better than the other expensive prepared bags of premixed flours made for pancakes (the Trader Joe's one is so-so, the Cherrybrook Kitchen one is downright repulsive, IN MY OPINION). Here is the flour mix. When you make it, store it in an airtight container in the fridge. When you measure or scoop from it, it says to stir to aerate it, spoon it into the measuring cup, do not pack, and level off with a straight edge. I think it is darn near perfect!

Artisan Gluten-Free Flour Mix

5 c. brown rice flour

3 c. sorghum flour

2 2/3 c. cornstarch

1 c. potato starch

1/4 c. + 4 t. potato flour

1 T. + 1 t. xanthan gum

They have recipes in the book using this mix for chocolate chip cookies, blondie cookies, imitation graham cracker crumbs, pancakes, biscuits, yellow cake and more. It was my first gluten-free cookbook buy and I don't regret it. I'm kind of particular because I'm a little bit of a health nut and exercise fanatic and I don't want to come home from Zumba and eat junk just cause I can't have wheat. Know what I mean? Best of luck with the recipes!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sa1937, my flour mix is a recipe out of "Artisinal Gluten Free Cooking" by the Bronskis. I used it to make pancakes today and was shocked at how good they were. I mentioned the book in a different post. They truly did not taste gluten-free. I can't say they actually tasted like wheat, but they were much better than the other expensive prepared bags of premixed flours made for pancakes (the Trader Joe's one is so-so, the Cherrybrook Kitchen one is downright repulsive, IN MY OPINION). Here is the flour mix. When you make it, store it in an airtight container in the fridge. When you measure or scoop from it, it says to stir to aerate it, spoon it into the measuring cup, do not pack, and level off with a straight edge. I think it is darn near perfect!

Artisan Gluten-Free Flour Mix

5 c. brown rice flour

3 c. sorghum flour

2 2/3 c. cornstarch

1 c. potato starch

1/4 c. + 4 t. potato flour

1 T. + 1 t. xanthan gum

They have recipes in the book using this mix for chocolate chip cookies, blondie cookies, imitation graham cracker crumbs, pancakes, biscuits, yellow cake and more. It was my first gluten-free cookbook buy and I don't regret it. I'm kind of particular because I'm a little bit of a health nut and exercise fanatic and I don't want to come home from Zumba and eat junk just cause I can't have wheat. Know what I mean? Best of luck with the recipes!

Thanks for the flour recipe, Tricky Mama! After you posted the the name of the cookbook, I pulled it up on Amazon and browsed through it. I really don't do that much baking as my kids are grown with families of their own (I live alone so don't have a need to stock up on cookies, etc.)

My greatest quest is to try to find a bread recipe that I can want to make over and over again. I've found a couple recipes I like but have a never-ending search to try new ones. I know this cookbook has a recipe for bread...have you tried it yet? If you do, please post the results.

This week I wowed my 11-year old granddaughter with pancakes made with the new gluten free Bisquick. She loved them and couldn't tell the difference between them and the ones her Mom makes. Yes, it's expensive and I know there's a recipe posted by halfrunner for a homemade Bisquick-type mix that I'd like to try.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the flour recipe, Tricky Mama! After you posted the the name of the cookbook, I pulled it up on Amazon and browsed through it. I really don't do that much baking as my kids are grown with families of their own (I live alone so don't have a need to stock up on cookies, etc.)

My greatest quest is to try to find a bread recipe that I can want to make over and over again. I've found a couple recipes I like but have a never-ending search to try new ones. I know this cookbook has a recipe for bread...have you tried it yet? If you do, please post the results.

This week I wowed my 11-year old granddaughter with pancakes made with the new gluten free Bisquick. She loved them and couldn't tell the difference between them and the ones her Mom makes. Yes, it's expensive and I know there's a recipe posted by halfrunner for a homemade Bisquick-type mix that I'd like to try.

Ditto. I purchased 3 boxes of the Bisquick mix to tide me over until I can try halfrunner's mix. I made waffles and they were excellent. I froze some and they were excellent 2 days later....soft when thawed out! My husband has been using Krusteaz for his waffles, and he ate some of mine, and now he has decided he wants the wheat free ones from now on! I have noticed that when he eats a hamburg on a wheat roll, he starts coughing and clearing his throat for about 3 hours after.....sounds like he also has food issues.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,118
    • Total Posts
      919,458
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Good luck with all the testing.  You are doing the right thing by telling your son to gluten up!  Buy him one of those gluteny cakes at a bakery...if that doesn't spike his numbers, nothing will. 
    • Thank you for this response! You are right, I'm sure. My sed rate was normal. My c reactive protein was 6, which is high. My platelets were a bit elevated and I was slightly anemic. I am going tomorrow for another endoscopy. I know that these things could be related to other things... but I'm thinking there is a change they are all still related to celiac (I'm hoping). What other autoimmune disease do you have, if you don't mind me asking?
    • HIV doesn't turn off the immune system, it destroys it to the point where most people die from complications that arise from having no immune system.  Some end up with pneumonia or cancer, which takes their life. It is pretty amazing the treatments they have developed for it, to slow it down and give people longer, quality time. I am perfectly content with the gluten free diet as my treatment and honestly, if they developed a pill that they claimed would make it possible for people to eat gluten again, I doubt I would. I could not bring myself to eat a food that I am genetically programmed to not be able to digest and that totally pisses off my immune system.  However, if they succeed with some of the meds they are working on now, one of which I posted about earlier this summer, I would take those.  They are working on things that modulate the immune system down so inflammation can be tamed down further.  Even with a strict gluten-free diet, there will always be more inflammation for us than for those who don't have AI diseases.  I do everything possible to tame it down myself but it isn't in the normal range.....yet. Long term inflammation can kill you so something along those lines would be welcome.  You would still have to eat gluten-free but the disease activity would be calmed down.  This is a drug that targets those with lupus and maybe Sjogren's....which I have.  There are possibilities for other AI diseases from that!
    • Hi Anns and welcome   Do you think that I am on the right course to see if I possibly have Celiac?   Yes, it was smart of you to consider the possibility and its good that you've had the tests. Both the aneamia and bloating are symptoms, although of course they may be unrelated. Best way to find out is to check as you are doing.   Can this develope later in life ( I'm 46)?   Yes, I think its most common discovered later rather than sooner.   I ate a meal last night that was gluten free and did not feel like nearly as bloated after eating, would I notice a change that quickly?  Thanksort for your input.   Yes, I noticed far less of a heavy feeling after eating very soon after diet changes. However you would be better off not trying gluten free just yet. I collected some links and other stuff here, it may be of use: Your best bet is to eat as normal and wait for the test results. If your doctors eliminate celiac there's nothing to stop you excluding gluten at that point to see if it helps. But before then you need to keep eating it to ensure an accurate diagnosis.  All the best  
    • Well HIV undermines the entire immune system as I understand it, so that would be akin to using dynamite to put out a kitchen fire! There is some work going on to try and retrain the immune system to not see gluten as a threat though: http://www.immusant.com/docs/ImmusanT DDW Data Release FINAL 5.24.16.pdf  I'm laughing as I write this imagining the conversations you could have with people as you tell them you'd like to contract HIV so that you can eat a decent sandwich        
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,159
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Anns
    Joined