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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Hormone Imbalance With Gluten Sensitivity
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7 posts in this topic

Since my diagnosis, I am on the most nutritional, herbal and medicinal support that I have ever been on but I still have food cravings, especially carbs!

I realize the hormonal imbalance complicates matters but I am treating the other conditions. So what I want to know is does anyone else have problems with food cravings? Mine seems to be worse in the afternoon and evenings. Like tonight, since it is Friday night I treat myself. Two pieces of gluten-free garlic toast and a western omelet for dinner. But then to offset my need for more carbs I snacked on salted sunflower seeds.

My husband, who is also on a gluten-free diet, doesn't have the daily cravings like I do.

Is this typical for gluten-free women?

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Hi Tammy:

I have always craved carbs and from what I understand our bodies need them for energy. I also think women especially crave them around that time of the month. ;)

Here lately I have been craving sweets, I eat Skittles almost every day!!! :D

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Your post got me thinking and wondering aboud celiac's affect on hormones in general. I have low hormone levels at an early age and am on HRT so I did a quick search and found some info. Celiac's can cause hypogonadism (low testosterone), infertility, etc:

Infertility, obstetric and gynaecological problems in coeliac sprue.

Sher KS, Jayanthi V, Probert CS, Stewart CR, Mayberry JF.

Leicester General Hospital, UK.

There is now substantial evidence that coeliac sprue is associated with infertility both in men and women. In women it can also lead to delayed menarche, amenorrhoea, early menopause, recurrent abortions, and a reduced pregnancy rate. In men it can cause hypogonadism, immature secondary sex characteristics and reduce semen quality. The real mechanism by which coeliac sprue produces these changes is unclear, but factors such as malnutrition, iron, folate and zinc deficiencies have all been implicated. In addition in men gonadal dysfunction is believed to be due to reduced conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone caused by low levels of 5 alpha-reductase in coeliac sprue. This leads to derangement of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Hyperprolactinaemia is seen in 25% of coeliac patients, which causes impotence and loss of libido. Gluten withdrawal and correction of deficient dietary elements can lead to a return of fertility both in men and women.

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TESTinME thanks for your input, it was enlightening. It does answer some of my 'why' questions. I just had my testosterone levels checked too. I can't wait to see the test results.

What, if any, nutritional supplements do you take to meet your health needs?

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I will attest to their being hormonal issues with celiac sufferers. I developed celiac disease when I was pregnant with my son (12 years old this May) and one of the symptoms/troubles I have had since then has been complete lack of monthly cycles. I thought I had devloped PCOS (runs in my family) or that my weight gain (celiac disease caused me to gain weight) was causing lack of menstruation.

Once I was diagnosed (Feb last year) and went gluten-free, my periods returned. It's nothing short of amazing...once I'd been gluten-free for 3 months, I had a period, first one in over a year (I'd have them maybe 1-2 every 2 years or so) and to my amazement, I had one again the following month, just 35 days later! Since then I've had them average 25-40 days apart.

I have suffered from infertility since our son was born but I'm wondering now if it's possible I might be able to have more children. I never thought I'd ever experience normal monthly cycles and here I am, having had 12 or so in a row!

My life has changed dramatically for the better since my diagnosis. I am convinced that had I gone on much longer w/out knowing the problem, I would have died w/in 5 years. I was terribly ill with everything under the sun and getting out of bed and facing each day was almost impossible.

I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder just before the celiac disease diagnosis. Although there really isn't any "proof," I *know* that being ill for so long with celiac disease caused me pyschological problems. I was a rapid cycler and everyone who knew me, thought I either only ran on hyper drive or extreme depression. I've not had a manic episode in well over 8 months now...that's a record. I was manic 90% of the time before going gluten-free, depressed the other 10%. My bouts of depression are all but gone and I'm hoping now to get the BP diagnosis removed/reversed.

So, in my opinion...celiac disease has everything to do with hormonal issues! I'm living proof :-)

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Cherie, My oldest daughter is bi-polar also and a rapid cycler. She has trouble focusing and misses work many times because of her mental problems. I absolutely feel she also has Celiac (I was diagnosed 3 years ago), but she is in complete denial about the possibility. I finally got her tested and she won't even tell me the results. I wish she would get her act together because I feel, at least she could lessen the amount of psychotropic medications if she were gluten free. Your stories are so much alike. I'm so glad you are improving. Shirley

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Cherie,

How wonderful to hear such a positive turnaround for you! I agree that your psychological diagnosis is worth looking into or possibly changing.

Poor health has a lot to do with how we think and behave. :D

Good Luck!

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