Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Food Pantry Issues
0

27 posts in this topic

Greetings,

:( I'm sure someone has had to deal with this before. I have no job, I was put out of my house, and I'm subsisting off of social services, food pantries and soup kitchens. I do have a rood over my head. Unfortunately there is not a book that tells a person with celiacs how to cope in these dire circumstances. How can I get the food that I need when all the foods that are offered have gluten in them? The first place that I went gave me the attitude that I shouldn't be asking for anything special under these conditions. I have gluten-free food that will last the next few days. After that, it will be by faith.

Sillyken :)

(read a sign that said "keep smiling! Its the law!)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

The first thing I can think of is do you have an Dr. diagnosis? If you do, get a copy of it so you can show that you have a 'special situation'. Are there counselers at the food pantry or soup kitchen? Maybe you could find a church that could help you. I think the place that said 'you should't be asking for anything special under these conditions' just does not understand problems with food and the severe problems it can cause. A lot of people I have come across say 'it's food, how can it hurt you?' I'm not sure if it is approiate to ask , where are you located? Maybe someone could help you find what you need.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sillyken,

Where are you located? I would gladly send you a bunch of gluten-free stuff!

I recently donated to our local Food Pantry and the volunteers there had NO IDEA

what I was giving them, nor the significance of it. I am positive all my gluten-free

goodies went to a gluten household. While important, not what I intended.

If I know of a gluten-free family in need, I would GLADLY ship out a box.

I mean it - and I'm sure others here could maybe do the same.

Support one another, people. It's a dog eat dog world, and they ain't gluten free!

:D

Take care,

Wendi

Sillyken - email me privately: wbrant@nc.rr.com

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh. What an awful situation. People don't understand malabsorption. They may as well offer you sawdust for all the good eating wheat does.

Is there any way you can get food stamps? Then you could buy some gluten-free food.

I agree with the idea of getting a doctors' note. In my city, there is a food bank where we donate canned goods. I'm sure plenty of them are naturally gluten-free - I've given things like canned veggies and Progresso soups myself. With a letter from a doctor you might be able to get them to give you naturally guten-free stuff.

Keep the faith, and good luck in what sounds like a really hard situation.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our food banks try to have canned fruits and veggies which are usually gluten-free. Also, canned chicken & tuna. Sometimes fruit and cheese. One gets hot dogs and keeps them frozen. Most hotdogs are gluten-free. Eggs too. All this assumes you can cook where you are staying. I have been giving Chex to our food bank. If you are in the Kansas City area, send me a message. I know 3 really nice food banks and a " soup kitchen" that might be able to help you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I did volunteer work for some time at our local food bank recently. You can't expect the folks there to know what they can safely give you, they just don't usually have the knowledge. We always had rice, canned and fresh (in season) veggies. The cereals we got would vary. They also would really load folks up with loaves of bread. I would suggest you go in and tell them all you can really use is canned veggies and fruits and plain rice and beans and plain meat if they have it (We always had some pnut butter, tuna, canned ham, hot dogs, sometimes chicken, turkeys, ground beef or venison depending on the season). Tell them that you are allergic to wheat and to PLEASE not give you bread or cakes and cookies. If they give you items you can't use donate them back on your next visit and tell them why you are bringing them back.

Do check into food stamps and check out places like the Salvation Army or a Catholic Charity etc and explain your situation. Some will give food vouchers you could use at the store for gluten-free bread.

I wish you the best. It is hard for a lot of us right now.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I'm sorry you are going through a rough time right now. Have you tried contacting your local celiac support groups? Perhaps they would know of a food pantry that would be more helpful than the ones you have encountered so far. Every food pantry is different--Some only give you a set bag or box and won't change what they give you (sometimes this has to do with how they receive funding, sometimes it's just for efficiency sake), some may be willing to work with you if you explain the situation. So don't give up trying. I agree it is a good idea to either get a doctor's note to show or tell them you have a wheat allergy (that may be taken more seriously and eliminate most of the gluteny products.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too would be more than happy to send you food or gift certificates, gluten-free soaps, shampoos, vitamins, whatever you need to stay healthy. Do you have means to cook or prepare food? Please send me a personal message on where I can send the shipment.

I also encourage you to reach out to a local church. My church would jump at the chance to help someone in your situation.

Take care, and know that there are people who care and want to help.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would second contacting your local celiac group or church - they will often help. I know here, for example, we have a family who was having financial trouble and worked out a barter system with people who could get them what they needed. They did yard work, etc... for these people in return, and it worked out well.

Do they have canned goods, or fresh produce, or only pre-made goods? If it's canned/boxed goods, there's a number of them that are gluten free, basically, that we could help suggest, if needed!

Greetings,

:( I'm sure someone has had to deal with this before. I have no job, I was put out of my house, and I'm subsisting off of social services, food pantries and soup kitchens. I do have a rood over my head. Unfortunately there is not a book that tells a person with celiacs how to cope in these dire circumstances. How can I get the food that I need when all the foods that are offered have gluten in them? The first place that I went gave me the attitude that I shouldn't be asking for anything special under these conditions. I have gluten-free food that will last the next few days. After that, it will be by faith.

Sillyken :)

(read a sign that said "keep smiling! Its the law!)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all you comments. To answer your questions:

1) I went to the salvation army the other day and was spoken to quite rudely by the people there who said "They were not a medical facility". IE take what you are given.

2) I was only given a few weeks of food stamps due to a recent emloyer who said I would be working full time by the 3rd. Unfortunatley, I won't start until the 21st of this month.

3) I am in the Winchester, VA area.

any other advice would be greatly appreciated.

Hungry Ken

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go to or contact a local Catholic church's office and ask to speak to or leave a message for the Society of St. Vincent de Paul representative. This is an organization that exists to help people in need with emergency situations, no strings attached, no requirement that you are Catholic. Usually the only requirement is that you live within the parish boundaries (prevents unscrupulous people from gaming the system by hitting up several parishes at once). If the church you contact is not the one nearest you, either you will be redirected or they will contact that parish on your behalf.

I tell you to go there because in the past I have served the community through this group (although in a different location) and we would not have hesitated to provide grocery store vouchers so that people could shop for food that they knew they could eat safely. It's just cruel to expect people to eat food that will make them sick. SVDP is usually a one-time service (they don't provide continuing care so that they can help the largest number of people, but they will give referrals to longer-term services whenever possible). Since you need something to bridge the gap until your income starts up again, SVDP might be a really good fit to help you through the rough patch.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to hear you are going through such a hard time and encountered such difficulty at the food-bank. When I was a social service worker, I used to run a food bank and when individuals came in with special dietary issues, I would issue a certificate for the local grocery store so that the person could buy groceries in-line with his/her particular needs. I am hopeful that you happened across a one-off food pantry and that if you explain your situation, perhaps bringing a medical note, you will be treated with the dignity you deserve.

I also think that the folks on here have given sage advice -- find a church, one with an outreach program, and approach that church for assistance. Can you get special funding or emergency funding via social assistance as a result of your celiac diagnosis? What state are you in?

Greetings,

:( I'm sure someone has had to deal with this before. I have no job, I was put out of my house, and I'm subsisting off of social services, food pantries and soup kitchens. I do have a rood over my head. Unfortunately there is not a book that tells a person with celiacs how to cope in these dire circumstances. How can I get the food that I need when all the foods that are offered have gluten in them? The first place that I went gave me the attitude that I shouldn't be asking for anything special under these conditions. I have gluten-free food that will last the next few days. After that, it will be by faith.

Sillyken :)

(read a sign that said "keep smiling! Its the law!)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all you comments. To answer your questions:

1) I went to the salvation army the other day and was spoken to quite rudely by the people there who said "They were not a medical facility". IE take what you are given.

2) I was only given a few weeks of food stamps due to a recent emloyer who said I would be working full time by the 3rd. Unfortunatley, I won't start until the 21st of this month.

3) I am in the Winchester, VA area.

any other advice would be greatly appreciated.

Hungry Ken

Get a letter from the employer stating that your work start has been delayed. Then go back to the food stamp office. They should be able to give you stamps to cover that gap that they were not aware of.

Also do contact the Catholic Charity that was mentioned. As stated they do not require you to be a Catholic to access their services.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if this group would work out for you or not. There are several threads about Angel Food Ministries on this site.

Angel Food Ministries Allergen Free Box follow up report

Angel Food ministries site

My understanding is they get their allergen foods from this site:

http://allergyfreefoods.com/2010/index.asp

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, call the largest food bank in your state directly and ask to speak to the nutritionist on staff. Not all food banks have nutritionists/RDs but more do than they used to. S/he may be able to assist you directly or be a liason with a local source.

Any place that sends full meals (like to AIDS or cancer patients) may also be a better resource and understanding of health issues.

I'm actually going to throw a post up on a listserv I'm on to investigate a little further. Excellent question, and something the food security community should be thinking about.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yhis would be an ideal oportunity for you to help not only yourself but any other potential gluten-free person who is in your situation...

get the dr's note then talk to the food bank manager about volunteering for a few hours... specifically marking what they have that is gluten-free, either marked by the manufacturer or naturally... you could also impart a wee bit'o knowledge to the staff about celiac disease in particular and even help them with other food allergies and issues so they can be "more helpful"

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, the person you spoke to at the sally anne should be ashamed of him/herself. The idea that you would be spoken to rudely is disgusting to me. And the idea that you would be sent away without the help you require! SHAMEFUL!

Do you have Saint Vincent de Paul in your neck of the woods (if I have the spelling right). It is a Catholic run service and, frankly, I find that the Catholic run assistance and outreach programs are much more client centred and helpful.

At this juncture, you are going to have to be your own best advocate. You know what - you need to attend at a large well organized food bank, the bigger the better, and by pass the volunteers! Speak to the social worker, director or nutritionalist. It is uancceptable that they are not meeting your dietary needs. Take medical documentation with you. I am right fecking angry about this.

The problem is that foodbanks typically carry crappy food, lots of regular pasta cuz it's cheap and canned goods cuz they are not perishable. Most of the canned goods will work for you. But you should have been given a certificate for the grocery store so you could buy meat, potatoes, rice, etc. GRRRR.

If you get nowhere, PM me.

KDawg

Thank you for all you comments. To answer your questions:

1) I went to the salvation army the other day and was spoken to quite rudely by the people there who said "They were not a medical facility". IE take what you are given.

2) I was only given a few weeks of food stamps due to a recent emloyer who said I would be working full time by the 3rd. Unfortunatley, I won't start until the 21st of this month.

3) I am in the Winchester, VA area.

any other advice would be greatly appreciated.

Hungry Ken

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad to say, not much in the way of responses yet. The actual tips (beyond speaking higher on the food chain):

-some places must give out a balance of foods in order to count it for funding purposes. Kinda like the school lunch. Make sure they know that you can take rice instead of bread or pasta and just weed out whatever else...?

-look for a place that operates more on the "grocery store/client choice" model rather than "free box"

-make friends with a coordinator who will listen (coordinator would likely set aside food for you)

-liability... don't know what to do about that.

It's being thought about, but unfortunately it's not too high on the list.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too would be more than happy to send you food or gift certificates, gluten-free soaps, shampoos, vitamins, whatever you need to stay healthy. Do you have means to cook or prepare food? Please send me a personal message on where I can send the shipment.

I also encourage you to reach out to a local church. My church would jump at the chance to help someone in your situation.

Take care, and know that there are people who care and want to help.

Hello,

Thank you for the offer. I will gladly recieve and pay it forward. Here is where you can send things

Ken Ritter

110 Buchannan Dr.

Stephens City, VA 22655

804-248-1372

God Bless You!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It never ceases to amaze me how compassionate I find the people on this site. In these times when so many are out of work, it brings out the best and worst in all of us. Today I have seen the best. You have restored my faith in the goodnes of people. God Bless!

Ken

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken,

I just signed up for this forum this morning.

I posted in the Parents of Kids with Celiac, then this afternoon I googled celiac and food stamps, your post came up as one of the top listings.

I am sorry you have to go through this, but I am in the same boat, although situations are different.

My husband was born with spina bifida and hydrocephalus and had no major problems growing up, but in 2005 became very ill and had to have brain surgery to fix his shunt that had broken, which meant the fluid building up around his brain (hydrocephalus)was not being drained down from his head into his abdomen because the shunt had malfunctioned, and was causing major issues.

After the shunt revision and abdominal surgery he came home to recover, but Hurricane Ike was headed toward Texas, and we had to evacuate due to his condition.

We came home three weeks later and our rental home had flooded, so we lost our home and only vehicle.

Moved into another rental home which was $200 more a month in rent and I had to take on a car note.

My husband broke out with severe psoriasis from the stress and recovery.

He later was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus.

My husband is believed to have Celiac, but waiting confirmation, and we were told to have our kids tested.

They were tested the end of July and we received the results yesterday which confirmed they do have it.

My husband has been unable to work since 2005, so I am a Spousal Caregiver, and mother to three kids.

The sole provider of income in our household and my salary is still not enough to make sure there is food in the house, so now this gluten free diet change for my children is going to be so hard when the wholefood stores are so very high priced here, and gluten free cereals, breads, and pastas are scarce in regular grocery stores that I've seen.

We receive a small under $100 amount in Food Stamps because they believe my income for a family of 5 is "making too much" for further help.

I am thankful for what we get, but those that are working hard and need help are always the ones hit with red tape.

The local assistant ministry for my zip code food pantry I know doesn't have gluten free, so I don't know what to do when I need there help again.

I contacted my two oldest children's school nurse, and she is contacting the districts dietitian.

The gluten free menu in public schools is very very limited the nurse said, so I will have to figure out what i can do to pack their lunch (they receive free breakfast and lunch at school because of our finances going to medical expenses and bills to not be homeless, so i barely make by with having extra money to put gas in the car for my work commute and making sure there is enough food in the house for the three kids and my ill husband).

I can only suggest you do as others advised, have a doctors note, find something you can put it in to keep it safe and protected, keep it on you at all times, so you can prove you aren't just "being picky" as the population would like to believe.

I know you might not be able to afford it right now, but there are medical bracelets you can get that say celiac disease.

I wish you the best, I know it's hard, and I don't know how I will get through it, but I have to for my kids.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken,

I just signed up for this forum this morning.

I posted in the Parents of Kids with Celiac, then this afternoon I googled celiac and food stamps, your post came up as one of the top listings.

I am sorry you have to go through this, but I am in the same boat, although situations are different.

My husband was born with spina bifida and hydrocephalus and had no major problems growing up, but in 2005 became very ill and had to have brain surgery to fix his shunt that had broken, which meant the fluid building up around his brain (hydrocephalus)was not being drained down from his head into his abdomen because the shunt had malfunctioned, and was causing major issues.

After the shunt revision and abdominal surgery he came home to recover, but Hurricane Ike was headed toward Texas, and we had to evacuate due to his condition.

We came home three weeks later and our rental home had flooded, so we lost our home and only vehicle.

Moved into another rental home which was $200 more a month in rent and I had to take on a car note.

My husband broke out with severe psoriasis from the stress and recovery.

He later was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus.

My husband is believed to have Celiac, but waiting confirmation, and we were told to have our kids tested.

They were tested the end of July and we received the results yesterday which confirmed they do have it.

My husband has been unable to work since 2005, so I am a Spousal Caregiver, and mother to three kids.

The sole provider of income in our household and my salary is still not enough to make sure there is food in the house, so now this gluten free diet change for my children is going to be so hard when the wholefood stores are so very high priced here, and gluten free cereals, breads, and pastas are scarce in regular grocery stores that I've seen.

We receive a small under $100 amount in Food Stamps because they believe my income for a family of 5 is "making too much" for further help.

I am thankful for what we get, but those that are working hard and need help are always the ones hit with red tape.

The local assistant ministry for my zip code food pantry I know doesn't have gluten free, so I don't know what to do when I need there help again.

I contacted my two oldest children's school nurse, and she is contacting the districts dietitian.

The gluten free menu in public schools is very very limited the nurse said, so I will have to figure out what i can do to pack their lunch (they receive free breakfast and lunch at school because of our finances going to medical expenses and bills to not be homeless, so i barely make by with having extra money to put gas in the car for my work commute and making sure there is enough food in the house for the three kids and my ill husband).

I can only suggest you do as others advised, have a doctors note, find something you can put it in to keep it safe and protected, keep it on you at all times, so you can prove you aren't just "being picky" as the population would like to believe.

I know you might not be able to afford it right now, but there are medical bracelets you can get that say celiac disease.

I wish you the best, I know it's hard, and I don't know how I will get through it, but I have to for my kids.

That's rough.

Food pantries can still provide you with things like canned fruit, juice, some have meat, PB, etc. Sometimes they may have Chex cereal (most are gluten-free and labeled gluten-free).

You can make rice then put pasta sauce and moz on it. Walmarts are carring a brand of gluten-free pasta that's about $2 a bag. My Walmart had it with the regular pasta. I think its called Heartland. Corn tortillas can be used instead of bread sometimes.

Be assertive with the school. They have an obligation to help your kids.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken, Do you have an HEB by you out there? I just got a $20 gc in the mail if you can use it, I will send it. They sell gluten-free stuff. Their HCF brand is gluten-free so you could buy like gluten-free pasta and some sketti sauce. Stuff like that lasts a while!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

My husband started going to a foodbank in our neighborhood a few months ago. It is a once-per-month thing. Anyway, typically they don't let folks go through - they just give you a box (actually, many boxes) of food to last the month. My husband told them that I had Celiac and need to be gluten free, and they let him walk through. He got tons of Amy's soups and some Whole Foods stuff. Now he always gets to walk through. So I know it is really hit and miss as to what person you get, but hopefully you'll find someone with a kind heart who will let you walk through and look for gluten-free stuff.

And on a bigger note, shouldn't we be doing something about this in our communities? Like writing letters to our food bank organizations and such. I'm going to write a letter to the Oregon foodbanks and just ask that folks be educated that people with Celiac Disease and other food sensitivies may need to be able to choose their own food. And maybe volunteer at foodbanks to help sort food by intolerance? I don't kow, but this problem is only going to become bigger, as the economy is not improving quickly and more and more people are being diagnosed.

Good luck to you.

Sherri

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken,

I just signed up for this forum this morning.

I posted in the Parents of Kids with Celiac, then this afternoon I googled celiac and food stamps, your post came up as one of the top listings.

I am sorry you have to go through this, but I am in the same boat, although situations are different.

My husband was born with spina bifida and hydrocephalus and had no major problems growing up, but in 2005 became very ill and had to have brain surgery to fix his shunt that had broken, which meant the fluid building up around his brain (hydrocephalus)was not being drained down from his head into his abdomen because the shunt had malfunctioned, and was causing major issues.

After the shunt revision and abdominal surgery he came home to recover, but Hurricane Ike was headed toward Texas, and we had to evacuate due to his condition.

We came home three weeks later and our rental home had flooded, so we lost our home and only vehicle.

Moved into another rental home which was $200 more a month in rent and I had to take on a car note.

My husband broke out with severe psoriasis from the stress and recovery.

He later was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus.

My husband is believed to have Celiac, but waiting confirmation, and we were told to have our kids tested.

They were tested the end of July and we received the results yesterday which confirmed they do have it.

My husband has been unable to work since 2005, so I am a Spousal Caregiver, and mother to three kids.

The sole provider of income in our household and my salary is still not enough to make sure there is food in the house, so now this gluten free diet change for my children is going to be so hard when the wholefood stores are so very high priced here, and gluten free cereals, breads, and pastas are scarce in regular grocery stores that I've seen.

We receive a small under $100 amount in Food Stamps because they believe my income for a family of 5 is "making too much" for further help.

I am thankful for what we get, but those that are working hard and need help are always the ones hit with red tape.

The local assistant ministry for my zip code food pantry I know doesn't have gluten free, so I don't know what to do when I need there help again.

I contacted my two oldest children's school nurse, and she is contacting the districts dietitian.

The gluten free menu in public schools is very very limited the nurse said, so I will have to figure out what i can do to pack their lunch (they receive free breakfast and lunch at school because of our finances going to medical expenses and bills to not be homeless, so i barely make by with having extra money to put gas in the car for my work commute and making sure there is enough food in the house for the three kids and my ill husband).

I can only suggest you do as others advised, have a doctors note, find something you can put it in to keep it safe and protected, keep it on you at all times, so you can prove you aren't just "being picky" as the population would like to believe.

I know you might not be able to afford it right now, but there are medical bracelets you can get that say celiac disease.

I wish you the best, I know it's hard, and I don't know how I will get through it, but I have to for my kids.

I want to say Welcome, Debbie. You are in a very tough spot. Are you involved with any local churches or religeous org? I would appeal there, as well. I get very frustrated to see how hard our country makes if those people who are working so hard to keep their family going. Not sure what else I can say to make things any better...but welcome!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,090
    • Total Posts
      920,307
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi, No, I do not have celiac  disease. I have an ankylosing spondylitis which is an auto-immune disease provoking an inflammation of the joints. Under the advice and supervision of my doctor and the professor at the hospital I follow a gluten free & casein free diet, which is extremely successful in preventing inflammatory events. And I've been doing so, strictly, for more than 6 years. So I'm not Celiac, but I can tell you that I react strongly every time I take gluten even in small amounts. Even soya sauce, which according to this website has an almost zero dose of gluten, is a lot too much for me. Nevertheless I allow myself to eat food which has been processed in a factory which processes gluten. To conclude, I would say that when you are travelling, especially in a country where celiac disease is scarcely known, you should be twice as careful as when you're going out at home. In the end you can never guarantee that the cook has cleaned his pan after using soya sauce and so on... You can only bet
    • Along those lines, many Americans are now pursuing gluten-free eating. Gluten ... Diagnosis of celiac disease typically requires a history and physical ... View the full article
    • No!  Once you fill the tub, if you sit in it for 3 minutes or you stay for 10... It doesn't change the amount or cost of the water.  That's only relevant if you have 3 kids to cycle thru that same water.  Is your hub bathing in the same water after you? Lol  And even if you add some more hot and stay longer....well...it's much cheaper than perscription meds, vodka or a substance that is legal in a few states.     Of course this only pertains to those of use with running water.... If you make your hub haul water from the creek or well and heat it over a fire....
    • Whether it is bona fide dermatitis herpetiformis, or severe eczema or hives or what have you, we all want to know how to stop the incessant itching.  Through all my research, the solution comes down to one thing: a good long soak in the tub-- with baking soda or Epsom salts or some kind of herbal tea, followed by a rub down in thick expensive lotion.  I don't know about you, but I was brought up to "get in, get done get out."  A long soak in the bath was a frivolous luxury, and a waste of time and hot water.  So now I'm having this awful breakout from forgetting to read a label and got wheated.  And every night I've been soaking in a baking soda bath to relieve the itching and aid my recovery.  And it's been hard! (But it's been very helpful too)  It has been hard to reconcile this "frivolous luxury and waste of time" as medically necessary!  Fortunately I've had no judging, and only support from my husband, who has had a similar upbringing.  Does anyone else struggle with this?
    • His son, Eli, had been misdiagnosed with celiac disease, so the family tried some gluten-free foods. After adding quinoa (KEEN-wah) to their diet, ... View the full article
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,117
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    cdliac3855
    Joined