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Son (8) Sneaks Gluten Foods


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18 replies to this topic

#16 JeepWidow

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Posted 22 September 2010 - 01:19 PM

The outside world is hard enough, especially on school age children that are differnt. I think home should be a safe haven where everyone feels safe, loved and respected. It sounds like your family really needs to come together and decide together (even if you have to steer the initial conversations) what kind of home makes everyone feel good, talk about Gluten issues and other hot topics so that everyone can relate. Maybe you should let your family take charge of meals a bit more (to the extent they can depending on their age), so they could have a sense of pride for making something healthy for everyone. On your sons night and it would allow your son to have some sense of accomplishment for chosing the right kind of foods. Control is often something that leads people to many kinds of eating disorders, and IMO a celiac eating gluten isn't different from an obsese person eating unhealthy foods as it's self distructive. You need to build positive feelings about doing the right thing. Also encourage your child to be more involved in his own health, let him talk with his doctors (maybe even without you there) it will foster a sense of personal responsiblity and pride in feeling grown up.
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#17 lilgreen

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 02:26 PM

The outside world is hard enough, especially on school age children that are differnt. I think home should be a safe haven where everyone feels safe, loved and respected. It sounds like your family really needs to come together and decide together (even if you have to steer the initial conversations) what kind of home makes everyone feel good, talk about Gluten issues and other hot topics so that everyone can relate. Maybe you should let your family take charge of meals a bit more (to the extent they can depending on their age), so they could have a sense of pride for making something healthy for everyone. On your sons night and it would allow your son to have some sense of accomplishment for chosing the right kind of foods. Control is often something that leads people to many kinds of eating disorders, and IMO a celiac eating gluten isn't different from an obsese person eating unhealthy foods as it's self distructive. You need to build positive feelings about doing the right thing. Also encourage your child to be more involved in his own health, let him talk with his doctors (maybe even without you there) it will foster a sense of personal responsiblity and pride in feeling grown up.


This is for everyone who took the time to post, and this above post is a great way to end. Thank you all so much for your replies. I have removed almost all gluten foods in the house - there are none that entice my son. No crackers, no snacks of any kind. Dh agrees that this is a good move. He goes along with my strictness, but tells me calm down when I point out possible moments of cross-contamination (ie. baking gluten and gluten-free pizza buns on the same cookie sheet). He hasn't yet accepted the seriousness of it, but I'm working on it. We've been gluten-free for 3 years now and he has been great at making gluten-free food when he does cook, so that's good. There's still room to go. As for my son, I love the idea of putting him in charge of dinner one night! There are so many other excellent suggestions that were made in this thread to try to make this work better in our house and I'm going to mull them all over and make a plan. Thank you! Thank you!
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#18 ProudMommyDebbie

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 06:03 AM

(((lilgreen)))

Above hugs for you.

I am new to this celiac and gluten free world, but just want to share my experience.
My husband was born with spina bifida and hydrocephalus and had no major problems growing up, but in 2005 became very ill and had to have brain surgery to fix his shunt that had broken, which meant the fluid building up around his brain (hydrocephalus)was not being drained down from his head into his abdomin because the shunt had malfunctioned, and was causing major issues.
After the shunt revision and abdominal surgery he came home to recover Hurricane Ike hit Texas, and we had to evacuate due to his condition.
We came home three weeks later and our rental home had flooded, so we lost our home and only vehicle.
Moved into another rental home and took on a car note.
My husband broke out with severe psoriasis from the stress and recovery.
He later was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus.

He's been unable to work since 2005, so I am a Spousal Caregiver, and mother to three kids.

He is believed to have Celiac, but waiting confirmation, and we were told to have our kids tested.
They were tested the end of July and we received the results yesterday.
All three of my kids have celiac.

My son is 8, so the same age as yours, and I have two daughters ages 6 and almost 4.
I don't know how i will make this change, but it has to be done, and quickly.
My son has allergies, so takes Allegra, he has chronic bronchitis or lunch infections when the weather changes every year between Jan-April, and all this bring on allergy induced asthma.
He has an inhaler at home and at school, and he has a breathing machine at home along with the mouth piece and medicine at the school for the schools breathing machine.

His school is trying to label him with having Attention Deficit Disorder, after testing his IQ, Academic Achievement, and also re evaluating his speech.
HE tested in normal range for IQ and no learning disabilities on the academic testing, and he now tests too high for an IEP in speech.
Due to the below grade level test scores at the end of 2nd grade, where they said he was below in reading and writing, and the history of the teachers having to redirect him to pay attention and do his work, they now want to not look into any other avenues and just say it's ADD.
I know celiac can cause these issues, so I hope this will help my son succeed in school.
He is smart and loves to read, loves math and science, he just gets easily frustrated and thinks he can't do things that are hard.
My 6 yr old daughter has eczema that breaks out on the crease of her arms where you bend at the elbow, then it breaks out at the back of her knees, she has premature acne breakouts on her chin, but it's not noticeable unless you are really close to her.
My youngest daughter , as the other two are lactose intolerant, but not yet shown signs of auto immune problems or other health issues.

The best thing I can do now that all three of my kids have it, is have them all eat the same thing at the same time.
I do not have it, but my husband might, but he can't change his diet till it is confirmed, so we will have any foods with gluten out of notice to the kids.

I know it's harder for you with your oldest having celiac, but the two younger not having it, and there always is the, "it's not fair he/she gets to eat that and i don't."
Just keep reiterating to your oldest that these foods will make him sick, it starts at home, and he will be surrounded by the gluten foods at school, so a good base at home will help him cope in the outside world.

I contacted my children's school nurse, and she is contacting the districts dietitian.
So I seem to have help in the works with the school, and now i will focus on the home.

Best of luck to you.
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Debbie - Mom to 3 Children with Celiac Disease

#19 mommyto3

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 12:22 PM

I don't have any advice as it's so hard to stop kids from sneaking it when they have minimal symptoms. My son is the same. He's 7 and all of his symptoms are behavioural (so he doesn't even realize). That makes it so hard. If given the chance, he will totally eat gluten. For instance he's at a birthday party right now and I know he'll eat the cake if the mom in charge there gives it to him (which we asked her not to). It would be so much easier if he got bad gut symptoms....at least that would deter him. Not that I'm wishing discomfort on him but how do you tell a kid not to eat something that he can't feel is hurting him?

Just wanted to let you know that we're in the same boat!
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