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My Bread Falls!


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6 replies to this topic

#1 jmeds77

 
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Posted 12 September 2010 - 06:13 PM

Why o why does my gluten-free bread fall every stinkin' time??? It looks so beautiful in the oven, then I take it out and it slowly caves in the middle while it cools. Please, suggestions and advice. I'm using Bette Hagman's Butter Basted with part brown rice flour and due to dairy allergies, using Earth Balance butter and substituting the dry milk for baby soy formula.
Thanks.
Jaime
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#2 sa1937

 
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Posted 13 September 2010 - 03:26 AM

Why o why does my gluten-free bread fall every stinkin' time??? It looks so beautiful in the oven, then I take it out and it slowly caves in the middle while it cools. Please, suggestions and advice. I'm using Bette Hagman's Butter Basted with part brown rice flour and due to dairy allergies, using Earth Balance butter and substituting the dry milk for baby soy formula.
Thanks.
Jaime

I've had my share of bread baking problems, too. My first thoughts are that it may contain too much liquid. And it may need to bake longer. Sometimes I take it out of the pan and then put it back in sideways and bake for another 5 to 10 min. No guarantees that it works though.

I like Earth Balance but haven't tried it for making bread. What shortening does she recommend? Butter? Or is it possible stick margarine would work better than Earth Balance? I did buy some Vance's DariFree to substitute for dry milk but haven't tried it yet. I also seem to be able to tolerate Lactaid milk or do you have a problem with casein?

Sorry, no answers...just a lot of questions for myself, too.
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Sylvia
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#3 SUZIN

 
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Posted 13 September 2010 - 05:45 AM

You are not alone......my bread does the same thing...and like you, I would appreciaate knowing what causes it...and what to do about it.....the bread is good tasting, but shrinks every time.....it does seem real moist...so maybe I could try using less water...??
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#4 RiceGuy

 
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Posted 13 September 2010 - 07:21 AM

Whenever I've had bread fall after baking, it was due to too much liquid. I've also found that fats tend to make breads fall or not rise so well, thus I never use fats in breads. Fat tends to defeat the binders. This seems to be one reason why gluten-free bread recipes with fatty ingredients usually contain a fair amount of eggs.

As was stated, you may need to bake it longer. If the crust is already as dark as it should be, then bake it at a slightly lower temperature, and for a longer period of time.

Some margarines (especially the ones in tubs) have a considerable water content, so this can be a factor as well. You may wish to try coconut oil instead, which is solid at room temperature, just like butter.

Not sure about the soy formula, but I do know that soy flour retains considerable moisture. It may therefore prevent the inside of the loaf from baking thoroughly. Soy flour also makes the bread darken notably sooner in the baking process, which can misrepresent how well the inside has baked. IMHO, I think you can leave out the milk, whatever the sort. Some recipes suggest adding some gelatin to give the loaf more moisture, which I suppose is what the milk is for. But again, I'd think the bread really doesn't need it. You might try replacing that ingredient with water.

The ideal bread is a matter of opinion, so depending on what kind of bread you like, you may ultimately end up using a different recipe.
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#5 Skylark

 
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Posted 13 September 2010 - 09:38 AM

I've also had bread fall from too much liquid. I find gluten-free bread is much touchier about the amount of fluid than wheat bread. The dough also tends to be moister, which means I can't follow my old and well-developed wheat baking instincts.
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#6 jmeds77

 
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Posted 13 September 2010 - 04:33 PM

Thank you for all the advice.
I will cut the liquid for sure. Trying coconut oil sounds promising - and tasty!
So, tomorrow I will roll up my sleeves, grab my containers of flours and get to experimenting!
I'm such a "rule follower" but understand gluten-free baking means I need to invent my own.
:)
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#7 lpellegr

 
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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:11 AM

Agreed - cut back on the water added. You can always add more, but can't remove it. If it calls for 1 cup, start with 3/4 and add more only if it's too stiff for the beaters once all the dry stuff is incorporated. Lower the oven temp by 25 - 50 degrees and bake it longer (5 min at a time, and then check). It's not foolproof, but it helps. I haven't had any bread yet that suffered from too little liquid, and an extra 5 minutes in the oven doesn't hurt. Cover it with a loose foil tent after the first ten minutes to keep the crust from overbrowning.
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Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....




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