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Bette Hagman's Basic Featherlight Rice Bread Help?
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This recipe is so easy I cannot for the life of me figure out why it never works! Here's what happens, it rises well, and looks like it bakes well until you cut it open. It's like it bakes most of the way and then stops. It's not exactly gooey it's just..wet like, spongy, and tastes not done. It also sinks in on itself if I let it cool. I have tried this recipe 4 times and STILL cannot get it to bake right! I've bakes it for 60 minutes every time and since my oven runs hot I have to turn it down 20 degrees to begin with so I tried it even lower to see if that would help it bake all the way through, no luck.

So, does anyone know?? Can it be where I live? I live in Florida so would the weather be affecting it? This is really crazy for me because I can for the most part cook and bake anything if I have a recipe. :| yeesh...

Thanks!

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I find that many of the gluten-free breads that I bake need to be baked past when we think they are done or past what the recipe/package instruction says. If it starts to brown too much you can gently lay a piece of foil on top to cover it. I know that at some point, part-way through baking, when the crust has almost reaced the desired brownness, I need to put some on or it will get too dark before the inside is baked.

I've never checked by oven temp to see if it runs accurate.

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I find that many of the gluten-free breads that I bake need to be baked past when we think they are done or past what the recipe/package instruction says. If it starts to brown too much you can gently lay a piece of foil on top to cover it. I know that at some point, part-way through baking, when the crust has almost reaced the desired brownness, I need to put some on or it will get too dark before the inside is baked.

I've never checked by oven temp to see if it runs accurate.

Agree - I always use foil after about 10-15 minutes baking.

You can also try a smaller pan.

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Try adding less water than it calls for. I find with most of her bread recipes that if it calls for 1 cup, I end up using about 3/4 cup. Also try lowering the temp to 375 or even 350 rather than 400, and bake it longer, 5 minutes at a time. Knock on the top of the bread and wait for it to sound solid. Put it back if it still springs back when you touch it. Don't cut it until it's completely cool. I still get this problem sometimes - it looks perfect until I take it out of the pan, and then it starts to collapse, but I've been having more successes than failures since I cut back the water and lowered the temperature. And bread that's too ugly for sandwiches can still make great croutons and crumbs.

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Try adding less water than it calls for. I find with most of her bread recipes that if it calls for 1 cup, I end up using about 3/4 cup. Also try lowering the temp to 375 or even 350 rather than 400, and bake it longer, 5 minutes at a time. Knock on the top of the bread and wait for it to sound solid. Put it back if it still springs back when you touch it. Don't cut it until it's completely cool. I still get this problem sometimes - it looks perfect until I take it out of the pan, and then it starts to collapse, but I've been having more successes than failures since I cut back the water and lowered the temperature. And bread that's too ugly for sandwiches can still make great croutons and crumbs.

If I put less water in it it would be extremely dry and crumbly (that's what it looks like before I add the water, even then it takes the full 1 1/2 cups to make it more pourable). I had turned my oven down to 300 and it still came out the same. So...I don't know? I guess I'll just use up the last of the flour mix and try it again. If it doesn't work I'm just going to try another recipe. :P

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If you keep on doing the same thing over and over again, you won't get a different result..... :rolleyes:

I'm assuming you used a recipe like this one: http://www.gluten-free-diet-help.com/gluten-free-bread-recipe.html

Which is a rice/potato starch/tapioca blend of flours using a combination of egg, egg white, and "egg replacer" and a little bit of vinegar to provide lift leavening besides the yeast.

(notice how the the type of yeast used affects rising time..... fast vs. regular. the water/liquids temperature, the temperature of the other ingredients, and the temperature and humidity of the place where the rising loaf is sitting, also will effect rising time. Up here in the dryer northern parts of the Pacific West, (we are talking bone sucking dry, in the summer, compared to Florida) yeast can be really slow on a cooler day unless pampered with a bowl of warm water set into the rising 'cave.' Poofing up dramatically, then falling, can be a symptom of overly long rising time for your conditions. On the other hand, if you're from some parts of the northeast, upper midwest, or Canada, and trying to bake in the winter, yeast can be even slower. Once the loaf is risen to where it's supposed to be, bake the thing. )

The egg replacer if it's ener-g, http://www.ener-g.com/store/detail.aspx?section=8&cat=8&id=97

is made of potato starch, tapioca starch, non dairy calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, citric acid, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, methylcellulose

This is then basically, a baking powder that is free of corn with tapioca added for stickieness. Calcium when added to vinegar and citric acid (vitamin C ) is going to fizz and make bubbles.

You say it's rising well, so the leavening doesn't seem to be the problem, it's the actual baking .

" I've baked it 60 minutes every time " - paraphrased

Get an oven thermometer and stick it in the oven on the shelf you are using. 300

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This recipe is so easy I cannot for the life of me figure out why it never works! Here's what happens, it rises well, and looks like it bakes well until you cut it open. It's like it bakes most of the way and then stops. It's not exactly gooey it's just..wet like, spongy, and tastes not done. It also sinks in on itself if I let it cool. I have tried this recipe 4 times and STILL cannot get it to bake right! I've bakes it for 60 minutes every time and since my oven runs hot I have to turn it down 20 degrees to begin with so I tried it even lower to see if that would help it bake all the way through, no luck.

So, does anyone know?? Can it be where I live? I live in Florida so would the weather be affecting it? This is really crazy for me because I can for the most part cook and bake anything if I have a recipe. :| yeesh...

Thanks!

I am not famiiar with this recipe, but I had made some banana nut muffins, and they were so fabulous, I made a 2nd batch. The 2nd batch was not good. When I went to put it in the pan it was "slimmy" for lack of a better word...more like "goop". It also rose super high, and then fell. The interior texture was wet compared to the 1st ones. The biggest difference I did between the 2 batches, is I used my mixer on the 2nd batch. I am wondering if over mixing could be an issue for this bread???

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