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Bette Hagman's Basic Featherlight Rice Bread Help?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 waterlily_

 
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Posted 17 September 2010 - 07:41 AM

This recipe is so easy I cannot for the life of me figure out why it never works! Here's what happens, it rises well, and looks like it bakes well until you cut it open. It's like it bakes most of the way and then stops. It's not exactly gooey it's just..wet like, spongy, and tastes not done. It also sinks in on itself if I let it cool. I have tried this recipe 4 times and STILL cannot get it to bake right! I've bakes it for 60 minutes every time and since my oven runs hot I have to turn it down 20 degrees to begin with so I tried it even lower to see if that would help it bake all the way through, no luck.

So, does anyone know?? Can it be where I live? I live in Florida so would the weather be affecting it? This is really crazy for me because I can for the most part cook and bake anything if I have a recipe. :| yeesh...

Thanks!
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#2 missy'smom

 
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Posted 17 September 2010 - 08:02 AM

I find that many of the gluten-free breads that I bake need to be baked past when we think they are done or past what the recipe/package instruction says. If it starts to brown too much you can gently lay a piece of foil on top to cover it. I know that at some point, part-way through baking, when the crust has almost reaced the desired brownness, I need to put some on or it will get too dark before the inside is baked.

I've never checked by oven temp to see if it runs accurate.
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#3 bbuster

 
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Posted 17 September 2010 - 03:14 PM

I find that many of the gluten-free breads that I bake need to be baked past when we think they are done or past what the recipe/package instruction says. If it starts to brown too much you can gently lay a piece of foil on top to cover it. I know that at some point, part-way through baking, when the crust has almost reaced the desired brownness, I need to put some on or it will get too dark before the inside is baked.

I've never checked by oven temp to see if it runs accurate.

Agree - I always use foil after about 10-15 minutes baking.

You can also try a smaller pan.
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Bev

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#4 lpellegr

 
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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:07 AM

Try adding less water than it calls for. I find with most of her bread recipes that if it calls for 1 cup, I end up using about 3/4 cup. Also try lowering the temp to 375 or even 350 rather than 400, and bake it longer, 5 minutes at a time. Knock on the top of the bread and wait for it to sound solid. Put it back if it still springs back when you touch it. Don't cut it until it's completely cool. I still get this problem sometimes - it looks perfect until I take it out of the pan, and then it starts to collapse, but I've been having more successes than failures since I cut back the water and lowered the temperature. And bread that's too ugly for sandwiches can still make great croutons and crumbs.
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Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

#5 waterlily_

 
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Posted 19 September 2010 - 11:14 AM

Try adding less water than it calls for. I find with most of her bread recipes that if it calls for 1 cup, I end up using about 3/4 cup. Also try lowering the temp to 375 or even 350 rather than 400, and bake it longer, 5 minutes at a time. Knock on the top of the bread and wait for it to sound solid. Put it back if it still springs back when you touch it. Don't cut it until it's completely cool. I still get this problem sometimes - it looks perfect until I take it out of the pan, and then it starts to collapse, but I've been having more successes than failures since I cut back the water and lowered the temperature. And bread that's too ugly for sandwiches can still make great croutons and crumbs.


If I put less water in it it would be extremely dry and crumbly (that's what it looks like before I add the water, even then it takes the full 1 1/2 cups to make it more pourable). I had turned my oven down to 300 and it still came out the same. So...I don't know? I guess I'll just use up the last of the flour mix and try it again. If it doesn't work I'm just going to try another recipe. :P
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#6 Takala

 
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Posted 20 September 2010 - 10:59 AM

If you keep on doing the same thing over and over again, you won't get a different result..... :rolleyes:

I'm assuming you used a recipe like this one: http://www.gluten-fr...ead-recipe.html

Which is a rice/potato starch/tapioca blend of flours using a combination of egg, egg white, and "egg replacer" and a little bit of vinegar to provide lift leavening besides the yeast.

(notice how the the type of yeast used affects rising time..... fast vs. regular. the water/liquids temperature, the temperature of the other ingredients, and the temperature and humidity of the place where the rising loaf is sitting, also will effect rising time. Up here in the dryer northern parts of the Pacific West, (we are talking bone sucking dry, in the summer, compared to Florida) yeast can be really slow on a cooler day unless pampered with a bowl of warm water set into the rising 'cave.' Poofing up dramatically, then falling, can be a symptom of overly long rising time for your conditions. On the other hand, if you're from some parts of the northeast, upper midwest, or Canada, and trying to bake in the winter, yeast can be even slower. Once the loaf is risen to where it's supposed to be, bake the thing. )

The egg replacer if it's ener-g, http://www.ener-g.co...n=8&cat=8&id=97

is made of potato starch, tapioca starch, non dairy calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, citric acid, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, methylcellulose

This is then basically, a baking powder that is free of corn with tapioca added for stickieness. Calcium when added to vinegar and citric acid (vitamin C ) is going to fizz and make bubbles.

You say it's rising well, so the leavening doesn't seem to be the problem, it's the actual baking .

" I've baked it 60 minutes every time " - paraphrased


Get an oven thermometer and stick it in the oven on the shelf you are using. 300 F is too cool to bake a loaf of bread in a hour unless you are using very small pans. Yet you said the higher temperature didn't work, either.

Now, look at your baking loaf pan. What size is it, and what is it made of ? Different pans behave differently. Metal and glass pans may take different baking times. Many misbehaving gluten-free bread recipes respond to changing the pan size to one size smaller, which means that they can cook thru more thoroughly. If you are using a 9" x 5" pan, you may have better success going to a different smaller one, but since this is a 3 cups of flour recipe, you may then have to use two smaller pans, or one 8" by 4" and the other a mini loaf pan.

I tend to use the higher protein, more exotic gluten free flours, using a smaller pan, and a cooler temperature than 400F, because otherwise almond and seed meal flours tend to burn . The other thing I do, is I never have a set baking time. I will bake it for as long as the recipe says the first time, and then test the loaf. First, tap the sucker on the top, does it feel springy ? Then I take a table knife and stick it in the loaf and pull it back out. this is crucial. if the knife does not come out clean, but has doughy goo sticking to it on the bottom, it is not done. If the bread is not done, it's simple- it goes back into the oven for 5 to 10 more minutes, and then I test it again. I don't pull a loaf out until the knife comes out clean. Sometimes it has to go back in, more than once.

This has saved me MANY underdone loaves.

The other thing than can be done, is the loaf can be tipped out of the pan, and laid across the top of the empty pan sideways, and finish baking for a few minutes almost totally exposed to the oven's hot air, to crisp up the sides and bottom of the loaf. But make sure the center passes the knife test, first.

Since this is a 3 cup flour, gluten-free "WHITE" rice bread recipe, they are counting on a hot oven to bake it with, but it may want to get overdone on top at that temperature. You may want to try starting your oven and initial baking at 400F, put a little foil tent over it after 10 minutes like the link suggests, but dropping your temperature to say, 375 or even 350F after the first 60 minutes, while you're trying to get the middle to finish baking without burning the top.
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#7 MelindaLee

 
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Posted 20 September 2010 - 05:53 PM

This recipe is so easy I cannot for the life of me figure out why it never works! Here's what happens, it rises well, and looks like it bakes well until you cut it open. It's like it bakes most of the way and then stops. It's not exactly gooey it's just..wet like, spongy, and tastes not done. It also sinks in on itself if I let it cool. I have tried this recipe 4 times and STILL cannot get it to bake right! I've bakes it for 60 minutes every time and since my oven runs hot I have to turn it down 20 degrees to begin with so I tried it even lower to see if that would help it bake all the way through, no luck.

So, does anyone know?? Can it be where I live? I live in Florida so would the weather be affecting it? This is really crazy for me because I can for the most part cook and bake anything if I have a recipe. :| yeesh...

Thanks!


I am not famiiar with this recipe, but I had made some banana nut muffins, and they were so fabulous, I made a 2nd batch. The 2nd batch was not good. When I went to put it in the pan it was "slimmy" for lack of a better word...more like "goop". It also rose super high, and then fell. The interior texture was wet compared to the 1st ones. The biggest difference I did between the 2 batches, is I used my mixer on the 2nd batch. I am wondering if over mixing could be an issue for this bread???
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