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Constipated On gluten-free And Diarrhea After Stopping gluten-free


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7 replies to this topic

#1 chucksusanandgrace

 
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Posted 19 September 2010 - 05:29 PM

Hello All,

I'm thankful to have found a forum that appears to be active. I was just tested for celiac via a biopsy of the small intestines. I was having some pretty severe heartburn so my Dr did an endoscopy and did a biopsy for hpylori as well as celiac.

I do have a question though.

I tried a gluten free diet about 2.5 months ago. I was going on this diet because I had some very odd symptoms that appear to be fibromyalgia. I started the diet and stayed on it only for 2-3 weeks. While on this diet, my intestinal tract got so messed up I was bloated and constipated (mind you, I have always had problems with IBS and such), but this was terrible.

I decided to go off the diet and afterwards, I have had diarrhea every morning when I awake two to three times immediately upon waking up. I have not had a "normal" bowel movement since going off the gluten free diet. This has been for about 6 weeks.

I am following up with the gastroenterologist this Thursday, but I am curious if you all know if these symptoms sounds like celiac or gluten intolerance??

I just wonder WHY is my intestinal tract so messed up since going off. And the reason I originally stopped the gluten-free was because I was soooo extremely bloated and constipated.

I'm wondering if it was possibly due to the soy products in so many gluten free foods and maybe that was why I was bloated and constipated??

Does this sound like it could be a gluten sensitivity?? Wondering if I should try the gluten-free diet again??

Thank you for your thoughts and opinions.

Susan
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#2 WheatChef

 
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Posted 19 September 2010 - 10:25 PM

Many people experience withdrawal symptoms during the initial stages of going gluten-free. It could have been that you went back on the gluten just as your body was starting to adapt to not being on it. If it ended up screwing with your intestinal microbes then it'll be a while before those get back in proper arrangement.

If you do decide to try gluten-free again, DO NOT EAT "GLUTEN-FREE PRODUCTS" DURING THE INITIAL PHASE. By "gluten-free products" I mean gluten replacement items like gluten-free breads/pastas/baked goods. These products have to use a lot of additional ingredients to get a finished product that anywhere remotely resembles gluten and all of these additives can cause their own health problems. Additionally, because there are normally multiple additives in each product it is hard to pinpoint exactly which one is causing problems. These sort of items are really best left until your body gets into a more stable situation a month or two into the diet when you can slowly introduce them into your diet and see how your body responds to it. It's just way too much new stuff to tax your body with right in the beginning of the change.
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Receiving a qualified diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is as useful as a Psychiatrist giving you a diagnosis of "Doesn't Think Right".

#3 chucksusanandgrace

 
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Posted 20 September 2010 - 04:26 AM

Many people experience withdrawal symptoms during the initial stages of going gluten-free. It could have been that you went back on the gluten just as your body was starting to adapt to not being on it. If it ended up screwing with your intestinal microbes then it'll be a while before those get back in proper arrangement.

If you do decide to try gluten-free again, DO NOT EAT "GLUTEN-FREE PRODUCTS" DURING THE INITIAL PHASE. By "gluten-free products" I mean gluten replacement items like gluten-free breads/pastas/baked goods. These products have to use a lot of additional ingredients to get a finished product that anywhere remotely resembles gluten and all of these additives can cause their own health problems. Additionally, because there are normally multiple additives in each product it is hard to pinpoint exactly which one is causing problems. These sort of items are really best left until your body gets into a more stable situation a month or two into the diet when you can slowly introduce them into your diet and see how your body responds to it. It's just way too much new stuff to tax your body with right in the beginning of the change.


Thank you very much for your reply. Too bad I didn't come on this forum before I started gluten-free. Great advice and when I go back on gluten-free, I will definitely go with the recommendations you have listed. I'm wondering if that is why I was also gaining weight on the gluten-free diet (all the processed food, etc).

Thank you kindly.

Susan
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#4 chucksusanandgrace

 
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Posted 22 September 2010 - 11:25 AM

Could these results have anything to do with celiac?

elevated CRP (C Reactive Protein)
elevated level of CH50
elevated ACA (anticardiolipin antibodies)
ANA (positive somtimes - negative right now)

I'm still waiting on my biopsy from the endoscopy.

Thank you

Susan
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#5 WheatChef

 
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Posted 23 September 2010 - 12:52 AM

Elevated levels on those sorts of tests certainly point straight towards autoimmune behavior. Unfortunately, the longer celiac disease goes untreated, the more significant chance you have of developing additional autoimmune conditions. All this fun stuff ends up causing self antibodies and severe systemic inflammation. Best of luck on getting some clear results.
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Receiving a qualified diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is as useful as a Psychiatrist giving you a diagnosis of "Doesn't Think Right".

#6 Marz

 
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Posted 23 September 2010 - 02:25 AM

Excellent advice from WheatChef :)

Before going gluten-free I never ever had issues with constipation, I always had my stomach working the other way, but afterward I started having issues with const. I figured it might be that my intestines are so used to d, that they need to learn how to work normally again :P

Of course, it could definitely be all the processed gluten-free stuff I was eating. Corn pasta, maize porridge, rice biscuits etc. So I'd second the advice to stay with non-processed whole foods for a while until everything calms down. Take note of what foods you were eating more of while gluten free - such as soy like you mentioned.

I also find that nowadays an accidental glutening can cause const for a few days before the d begins. So perhaps you were getting traces of gluten accidentally (cc from utensils, toaster etc)?

** I really think the fact that you're now getting D while on gluten, whereas you were "fine" before suggests gluten intolerance or celiac disease, by the way :) Lots of people become more sensitive to gluten after going gluten-free. **

Also be aware that many celiacs/gluten-intolerants are sensitive to soy and dairy as well. Once you went gluten free, your stomach might have started reacting to some other problem food, that was "masked" while you were on gluten.
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Feb 2010 - Start of continuous GIT problems and panic attacks
July 2010 - Blood and biopsy -ve, went gluten free after testing which completely relieved symptoms
July 2011 - 1 year gluten free, food intolerances (Chicken, eggs, olives, goat milk) gone!

2012 - Soy no longer a problem
*************************************************************
Gluten intolerant

#7 chucksusanandgrace

 
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Posted 23 September 2010 - 09:03 AM

Thank you SO much. You all are most helpful and I really do appreciate it. I get my biopsy results back today from the gastro. I do have one more question, if you are "gluten intolerance", can that still cause serious issues and mess up the blood (abnormalities within the blood) and cause inflamation??

Thank you most kindly.

Susan


Excellent advice from WheatChef :)

Before going gluten-free I never ever had issues with constipation, I always had my stomach working the other way, but afterward I started having issues with const. I figured it might be that my intestines are so used to d, that they need to learn how to work normally again :P

Of course, it could definitely be all the processed gluten-free stuff I was eating. Corn pasta, maize porridge, rice biscuits etc. So I'd second the advice to stay with non-processed whole foods for a while until everything calms down. Take note of what foods you were eating more of while gluten free - such as soy like you mentioned.

I also find that nowadays an accidental glutening can cause const for a few days before the d begins. So perhaps you were getting traces of gluten accidentally (cc from utensils, toaster etc)?

** I really think the fact that you're now getting D while on gluten, whereas you were "fine" before suggests gluten intolerance or celiac disease, by the way :) Lots of people become more sensitive to gluten after going gluten-free. **

Also be aware that many celiacs/gluten-intolerants are sensitive to soy and dairy as well. Once you went gluten free, your stomach might have started reacting to some other problem food, that was "masked" while you were on gluten.


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#8 WheatChef

 
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Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:42 PM

I do have one more question, if you are "gluten intolerance", can that still cause serious issues and mess up the blood (abnormalities within the blood) and cause inflamation??


It certainly can. Technically celiac disease, which is defined by blunted microvilli in response to gluten exposure, is possibly merely a symptom of gluten intolerance (immune system response to gluten exposure). Gluten related autoimmune attacks (gluten intolerance) in places such as the brain, lungs and skin have been observed in patients even without the presence of blunted microvilli (celiac disease). This is where the problem of using the "gold standard" of diagnosis (biopsy) starts to get confusing. If the definition of celiac disease is solely isolated to the intestine, who really cares about whether you have celiac disease or not when you can have other major organs being eaten by your body regardless.

The above combined with a relatively significant false-negative rate in biopsies are reasons why a lot of people on these boards are more concerned with how your health responds in regards to gluten consumption as opposed to the tests.

Biopsies however can help show possible alternative causes to digestive issues opposed to celiac/gluten intolerance that can share many of the same symptoms but require different forms of treatment.
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Receiving a qualified diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is as useful as a Psychiatrist giving you a diagnosis of "Doesn't Think Right".




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