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L-glutamine
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Hello :) I've been meaning to post about L-Glutamine for some time, both for others & to remind myself why I need to be taking it. I hope that you will find this information useful :)

A long time ago I started taking L-glutamine when I was doing a lot of weight lifting, because it helps your tissues to heal, increases immunity, makes you feel good, etc. I later learned that it helps your intestinal tract, and am excited to write about how it can help those of us with celiac disease!!

This first part is from Ron Hoggan & James Braly (authors of Dangerous Grains):

Glutamine for Villous Atrophy and a Leaky Gut

L-glutamine, the most abundant amino acid in the blood, brain, and skeletal muscle, is a tasteless, nontoxic, conditionally essential amino acid that appears to be showing promise in the treatment of celiac disease. Research demonstrates that glutamine is the primary fuel for the lining of the small instestine and immune system.

When given in therapeutic doses (9-20) grams a day in divided doeses), it also releases growth hormone and increases the production of a powerful, detoxifying, antioxidant enzyme called glutathione peroxidase. Glutamine also seems to protect the intestinal lining from the destructive action of alcohol, NSAIDS, and aspirin. It has been reported that glutamine is now the most popular anti-ulcer medication in Asia because it heals and helps prevent peptic ulcers. In a recent study in Japan, 92 percent of ulcer patients given 1,600 mg of glutamine a day showed complete healing of duodenal and peptic ulcers in four weeks. It is also currently being administered intravenously to patients receiving major abdominal and bone marrow surgery, therapy for third-degree burns, and chemotherapy or radiation for cancer.

From our perspecitive, the single most promising benefit of glutamine is that, when removed from the diet, it may prevent and reverse villous atrophy, a leaky gut, and the malabsorption of nutrients so commonly seen in celiac disease and Crohn's disease.

We would conjecture that glutamine's primary value will not be to substitute a gluten-free diet, but to help accelerate healing when initially going off gluten and to lessen intestinal inflammation when gluten is inadvertently or intentionally reintroduced back into the diet.

More to come.. ;)

- Michelle :wub:

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Okay, this is a little more technical but worth reading:

Gastrointestinal Disease

The gastrointestinal tract is by far the greatest user of glutamine in the body, as enterocytes in the intestinal epithelium use glutamine as their principal metabolic fuel. Most of the research on glutamine and its connection to intestinal permeability has been conducted in conjunction with the use of TPN. Commercially available TPN solutions do not contain glutamine, which can result in atrophy of the mucosa and villi of the small intestine. Addition of glutamine to the TPN solution reverses mucosal atrophy associated with various gastrointestinal conditions.[3] Research has demonstrated glutamine-enriched TPN decreases villous atrophy, increases jejunal weight, and decreases intestinal permeability.[4,5] Trauma, infection, starvation, chemotherapy, and other stressors are all associated with a derangement of normal intestinal permeability. One potential consequence of increased intestinal permeability is microbial translocation. Bacteria, fungi, and their toxins may translocate across the mucosal barrier into the bloodstream and cause sepsis.[6] In numerous animal studies of experimentally induced intestinal hyperpermeability, the addition of glutamine or glutamine dipeptides (stable dipeptides of glutamine with alanine or glycine) to TPN improved gut barrier function, as well as immune activity in the gut.[7] Conditions characterized by increased intestinal permeability that might benefit from glutamine supplementation include food allergies and associated conditions, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. A clinical study of ulcerative colitis patients demonstrated that feeding 30 g daily of glutamine-rich germinated barley foodstuff (GBF) for four weeks resulted in significant clinical and endoscopic improvement, independent of disease state. Disease exacerbation returned when GBF treatment was discontinued.[8] It has also been suggested that cabbage juice consumption may provide benefit to patients with gastric ulcers and gastritis, by virtue of its high glutamine content.

(taken from: http://www.Lame Advertisement/p/articles/mi_...4_6/ai_78539420 )

BTW - "TPN" is total parenteral nutrition - it is used for people who cannot get their nutrition through eating (think IV). Those of us who *can* get out nutrition through eating will benefit from l-glutamine supplements.

Okay, let me go find more.. :)

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If you are interested in this, I *highly* suggest L-Glutamine from Jarrow. It is pharmaceutical grade, pure, and inexpensive (particularly at webvitamins.com). Here is a link to their l-glutamine powder:

http://www.jarrow.com/products/LGlutaminePowder.htm

I also wrote to them asking if their l-glutamine was safe for celiacs and received a letter stating that their glutamine products are free of gluten.

:)

Oh, BTW - the search function at webvitamins SUCKS! Here is a link to the page you want: http://www.webvitamins.com/category.aspx?i...did=195&page=19 - and then is one other glutamine products on the next page.

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So does nobody care about this? :(

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So does nobody care about this? :(

Hey Michel, don't take it personally, we all get busy and don't read every day.

I found your info very interesting and I actually have some of the L-glutimine and tried it. I was having a hard time and it got worse so decided to stop it for awhile.

I may try it again now that I'm doing better. granny

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Oh boy. I'm attempting to wade through the Dangerous Grains and China Study books all at once! :o I'm going to pencil in Lglutamine for JULY!! I'm very appreciative for all the info you've posted. You should write your own book! You're very knowledgable on a variety of topics I'm currently looking into. When I see your posts, I don't always respond to them, but I'm off at Barnes and Noble trying to find the books I need to educate myself. So, I'm off now to ponder the benefits of a gluten-free/cf lifestyle change for my entire family some more.

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Just because someone may not respond does not mean they do not find the information very helpful.

I take this supplement and we have heard nothing but good things about it :D

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wow..., so kaiti you take this. what have you personally noticed from taking it? i could use some extra help myself :)

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Thanks guys :)

I forgot to add something: If you do take it, the timing is really important. You need to take it on an empty stomach. Thirty minutes before or two hours after a meal. I take mine in powder form dropped in a glass of almond or soy milk. I use the powder so I can get a high dose w/o lots of pills.

Also - for those who've had problems with it. You need to be *really* careful about gluten contamination from this - as glutamine is frequently derived from wheat protein. That's the reason I put up the Jarrow information - I know it's safe. (And effective!)

Glutamine has a LOT of other benefits that could be helpful to us (as celiacs). We need glutamine more than people who don't have problems with their intestinal lining - a lot of it. Our intestines use glutamine for a food source, and if they don't receive enough of it they are unable to heal. And obviously, if our intestinal tract isn't happy - we aren't able to absorb things & that leads to us being unhappy!

Not only that - but glutamine does a lot of other things (besides heal the intestine)! It really is a wonderful supplement. I slacked off for a while, but am definitely going to start taking it religiously again :)

I have a book that deals with the various amino acids (The Healing Nutrients Within - by Eric Braverman, M.D.). Some of the clinical uses suggested for glutamine include: Aging and Mental Performance, Alcoholism, Alzheimers Disease, Anxiety, Appetite Suppression, Benigh Prostatic Hypertrophy, Cancer, Depression, Diabetes & Hypoglycemia, Encephalopathy, Hypertension, Involuntary Muscular Movement Syndromes, Schizophrenia, Seizure Disorders, Stroke, Gout, Migraine... etc.

Thanks for showing interest :) I did this post (kind of) for me so that I would see that I need to start taking it again and stop screwing around. But then I realized how much I wanted you guys to take it too. I want all of us to heal - not just me! :)

I love you guys :wub:

- Michelle :)

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wow..., so kaiti you take this. what have you personally noticed from taking it? i could use some extra help myself :)

I started taking it a while ago(around the time I was diagnosed- when I really needed some major help). I should be on it probably more then I am right now but I do take it. It seems to work really well. It's in one of the pills I take...it has a variety of things in it. I'll have to check on the name of it..I don't have the bottle near me at the moment. I'll let you know what all is in it. My mom is a big fan of it too. She is really knowledgable in supplements and has really done so much research about it...she definitely likes the supplement way rather then medications.

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Hey Bean,

I am very, very intersted in nutritional supplements and things that can help. thanks very much for the tip and all the great info on Glutimine.

I am definitely interested. I ordered the book dangerous grains, but still waiting for it to arrive.

Thanks for taking the time.

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AN INCREASE IN BRAIN GLUTAMINE CAN CAUSE AN INCREASE IN THE RELEASE OF GLUTAMATE BY THE NEURON INTO THE SPACE BETWEEN THE NEURON. IF THE INCREASE IS NOT CONTROLLED AND MODULATED CORRECTLY BY THE THE BRAIN AND NERVOUS SYSTEM THEN THE RESULT WILL BE A PHENOMENON KNOWN AS GLUTAMATE EXCITOTOXICITY. GLUTAMATE EXITOTOXICITY IS THE NECROSIS (premature death) OF NEURON BY PAROXYSMAL OVERACTIVITY (OVER EXITATION) BY GLUTAMATE.

http://www.newtreatments.org/loadlocal.php?hid=974

My opinion is everyone who consider taking protein supplement should read the book (Excitotoxins the taste that kills) before swallow any of thoses. I am amazed by all the web sites promoting glutamine and protein supplement.

I would consider the fact that my body is already full of glutamine, glutamate and glutamic acid, because of its presence everywhere in food. Therefore, why should I risk food poisoning. To heal what exactly?

May be you should ask your governator about his stomach and see what protein supplement did to his brain and second brain, where most neurons are.

;)

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I hate that you've caught me when I'm away from my books ;) I will get back to you on this - absolutely, because I don't want anyone to be concerned.

But consider this:

Several stressors can result in a decrease of muscle glutamine levels. These stressors include, but are not limited to, burns, fasting, malnutrition, uncontrolled diabetes, infections, trauma, surgery, and intense exercise. Indeed, stress can result in a reduction of glutamine stores up to 50 percent (Di Pasquale, 1997).

In general, glutamine is the first amino acid to be compromised and the last one to be replaced. Intramuscular glutamine is sacrificed in order to preserve immune and organ function. The body does up-regulate the production of glutamine during times of stress, but in many cases the supply cannot keep pace with the demand. Besides depleting glutamine, other amino acids such as the branch chain amino acids are also compromised because they are used to replace glutamine through a series of enzymatic reactions. This, in turn, results in fewer amino acids for construction of skeletal muscle contractile proteins (Di Pasquale, 1997).

http://web.ask.com/redir?u=http%3A%2F%2Ftm...snip&Complete=1

Remember that a lot of us with celiac disease are malnourished, uh? This is a condition that calls for increased amounts of l-glutamine. It is the primary food for the intestines - and often (particularly after initial diagnosis) people with celiac disease *need* additional healing nutrients.

I appreciate your response and concern, and I will consider it very strongly. But I do question it's validity in our situation.

I'll see what I can find to either support or refute your post :)

- Michelle

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Let's talk about validity of not taking glutamine in coeliac situation. I will say so, and it's not because i want to win the argument. One of my favorite doctor: Mercola, recommend to take glutamine and i do believe he is wrong. Everybody can make mystake. let me tell you why, by another argumentation than the exitotoxin thing.

As i know things by now, there is two ways to get candida and other fungus problem. One is cell death (excitotoxins, free radicals, food poisoning), the second way is a combination of sugar and peptids or protein. As you mentioned in one of your text, hpw1 ,a gliadin portion, is now recognized to bind candida to the GI tract.

Let’s talk about the first brain now and the risk of eating refined protein such as glutamine.

Alzheimer diseaze is caracterized by a white coat at the surface of brain. Does it make you think of something else? that coat is supposed to be a coat of proteins. What protein are they?

Let’s go see another brain disease, the mad cow disease. You know that prion are causing mad cow disease.

"prions also occur naturally in some organisms (such as yeast) and may play important roles in their growth and development

Lev Osherovich and colleagues confirmed what others have seen, namely that an area rich in glutamine and asparagine was responsible for the aggregation and growth of prions-acting like a patch of Velcro that locks the misshapen proteins together."

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=97

have you already saw a mad cow in your tv screen: it shakes just like someone who has parkinson.

therefore, I really do believe we should not take glutamine supplement. IT creates a favorable environnement for fungal disease such as thoses mentioned above.

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I think it is always a good idea to research both sides of the story. Here are some good sites:

http://www.mercola.com/2004/may/1/glutamine.htm

http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/3166.html

It may be a good idea to get glutamine levels checked, and if they are low, then talk to your doctor about taking supplements.

I agree because my levels were low. I don't need it as much as I did but I still need to take it occasionally. I agree that too much is too bad...but thats the same with pretty much anything.

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Carrie -

Thanks for posting the mercola site. I think it's a great commentary because it contains a link to Robert Crayhon's rebuttal of the Excitotoxins author AND the rebuttal to the rebuttal :huh:

Here is his quote:

"Also, the idea that supplemental glutamine is all metabolized to glutamate is simply not the case. Have you ever seen a patient with MSG sensitivity? The symptoms these patients have are the symptoms of excess glutamate: headaches, nausea, dizziness, and this is something I have never seen nor seen reported with high dose glutamine. The body is very good at controlling the Glutamine-Glutamate pathway, which requires B6. I have had many discussions with cell biologist PhDs about this idea that glutamine turns to glutamate at will, and they all say that this is a misstatement, and are particularly critical of Russell Blaylock for making this error in his book.

After all, why doesn't the glutamine all just turn to GABA? Then glutamine would not over excite your neurons, it would put you to sleep. Glutamine clearly does neither."

I think it's a great idea to consider both sides of this argument!

Luap -

You have made some very educated comments. And I have made incorrect quotes! I listed "Clinical Uses" from "The Healing Nutrients Within" book (Eric Braverman, MD, Carl Pfeiffer, MD, PhD, Ken Blum, PhD, & Richard Smayda, DO) including Alzheimers Disease. Let me give you the direct quote (which I didn't list - and was inadvertently listing it among conditions that benefit from supplementation).

"Increased levels of glutamic acid have been found in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The significance of this finding is unclear, but these levels are doubtless related to the seizures that frequently occur following loss of memory." - So, despite the fact that they say that the significance of these findings are unclear, they are not suggesting supplementation for those with Alzheimers.

Conversely, they *do* note that: "Measured intelligence quotient (IQ) also decreases with aging. Both GABA and glutamic acid in megadoses have been reported to raise IQ in the elderly, and these nutrients, along with glutamine, have been found effective in treating various forms of age-related decrease mental performance."

Also CANCER - The quote (I can't believe I am such a jerk to not read these paragraphs & only post the headings!! I am so sorry :( ) is: "Glutamine provides cells with fuel for growth. Unfortunately, a substantial body of evidence indicates that glutamine serves as respiratory fuel for tumor cells. The enzyme glutaminase which, breaks down glutamine and asparaginase, which breaks down the amino acid asparagine have been used as componenets in an effective drug for cancer. The drug, known as asparaginase (Elspar), is particularly useful in treating acute leukemia and lymphocytic malignant cells because these cells depend on glutaminase whereas normal cells do no, and exemplifies the rare situation of an enzyme being absorbed by the stomach. ... This action may also explain why a vegan diet can be useful in cancer treatment (glutamic acid and glutamine occur mainly in animal protein."

Conversely (I love that word :P) "GABA and its analogs have been found to exhibit some anticancer properties against experimental sarcomas, particularly when combined with chemotherapeutic agents. "

ENCEPHALOPATHY

"Glutamine is greatly increased in the brain and the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with hepatic encephalopathy - a form of liver damage in alcoholics. This condition is marked by a decline in brain function manifested as speech dificulties, altered sleep, tremors, and other symptoms due to the accumulation of toxins in the brain caused by abnormal functioning of the liver. Abnormal levels of glutamate are also found in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. The breakdown of glutamate is the major involvement of the amino acid system in kidney and liver ammonia metabolism. ... During dialysis encephalopathy, GABA is decreased or normal in cerebrospinal fluid but decreased significantly in the brain. Glutamic acid and glutamine should be used with caution in these patients, but GABA maybe an important therapy for them."

But then on the other hand... :rolleyes: (ALCOHOLISM) "Glutamic acid and glutamine therapy may reduce cravings for alcohol. In one impressive study, alcoholics were give 2 g of L-glutamine three times a day, or 6g daily for one month. The second month, they received 12 g, and in the third and fourth months, the dose was increased to 15 g daily. Compared to placebo, 75% of alcoholics reported to have definite improvements or control over their alcoholism ... In follow up studies, vitamins containing large amounts of MSG (approx. 7-8 g/day) were used. These alcoholics experienced a 70% improvement. ... Some nutritionists continue to use L-glutamine and report good results in the treatment of alcoholism. ... For those who are chronically resistant alcoholics, trials of 6-15 g of L-glutamine would be justified. The theoretical basis for glutamine's action may relate to glucose metabolism; glutamine can provide adequate energy for the brain in the absence of glucose."

Ugh. Food for thought. I need a break!!

Anyway, thanks for everyone's posts on this! I have more info but my brain is tired ;) I'll get back to you.

- Michelle :wub:

p.s. In case you are wondering, I am going to continue to take large doses of glutamine (10-20 g/day) for 4 weeks and then take a small dose daily thereafter (approx. 5 g/day). I'll give you my reasoning when I'm less tired. :)

p.p.s NOTE: "Glutamine should not be taken by persons with cirrhosis of the liver, kidney problems, Reye syndrome, or any other disorder that can result in an accumulation of ammonia in the blood." (The Healing Nutrients Within)

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Luap -

Okay, first I want to know what mad cow disease has to do with glutamine..? I have read your statement a number of times now and cannot find the correlation. Perhaps you are trying to say that glutamine & asparagine promote the growth of mad cow disease. That may be true. But, that does *not* mean that they *cause* mad cow disease. I'm not really sure of what point you are trying to make here. That sounds a little like blaming a piece of tape for causing the damage of an acid if you place an acid on the skin and put tape over it. I don't quite get it.

(Luap) AN INCREASE IN BRAIN GLUTAMINE CAN CAUSE AN INCREASE IN THE RELEASE OF GLUTAMATE BY THE NEURON INTO THE SPACE BETWEEN THE NEURON. IF THE INCREASE IS NOT CONTROLLED AND MODULATED CORRECTLY BY THE THE BRAIN AND NERVOUS SYSTEM THEN THE RESULT WILL BE A PHENOMENON KNOWN AS GLUTAMATE EXCITOTOXICITY. GLUTAMATE EXITOTOXICITY IS THE NECROSIS (premature death) OF NEURON BY PAROXYSMAL OVERACTIVITY (OVER EXITATION) BY GLUTAMATE.

(Response) "Optimal functioning of the brain requires that excitation is balanced with inhibition. GABA was identified some fifty years ago as the most prevalent inhibatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Many neurologic, psychiatric, and impulse disorders and addictive behaviors that have agitation and manic behaviors or high levels of anxiety associated with them such as Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, or any seizure disorder, alcohol or drug addictions, sleep disorders, chronic pain syndromes, or even chronic stress and illness are conditions affected by GABA receptors. GABA blocks stress and anxiety-related messages from reaching the motor centers of the brain by occupying their receptor sites." (The Healing Nutrients Within")

My point here is based on the fact that NOT ONLY can glutamine be converted to glutamic acid but it can also be converted to GABA. The point made by Robert Crayhon (that I noted in my previous post) is really important! "The body is very good at controlling the Glutamine-Glutamate pathway, which requires B6. I have had many discussions with cell biologist PhDs about this idea that glutamine turns to glutamate at will, and they all say that this is a misstatement, and are particularly critical of Russell Blaylock for making this error in his book. ... After all, why doesn't the glutamine all just turn to GABA? Then glutamine would not over excite your neurons, it would put you to sleep. Glutamine clearly does neither."

(Luap) I would consider the fact that my body is already full of glutamine, glutamate and glutamic acid, because of its presence everywhere in food. Therefore, why should I risk food poisoning. To heal what exactly?

Okay - two points here:

1- You consider that your body is already full of glutamine, glutamate and glutamic acid because of it's omnipresence in food. You might note that while glutamic acid is plentiful in foods, both GABA and glutamine are absent (Glutamine & GABA are amino acids synthesized from glutamic acid). Also, how much food do you eat? And what kind? You might consider that glutamic levels of food are not as high as you presume. For instance, it takes ONE POUND of Ham to provide 13 grams of glutamic acid. And according to my little table, Ham has the highest concentration of glutamic acid. I, personally, don't eat a whole lot of ham and am not too worried ;) Luncheon meat contains 10 g/pound. I don't eat many pounds of that per day either. In fact, the highest concentration of glutamic acid actually comes from wheat gluten (which not a whole lot of us celiacs eat ;)). Glutamic acid makes up 43% of wheat gluten, 23% of casein, and 12% of gelatin proteins. *I* am allergic to dairy (hence, no casein), and avoid gluten. I also don't eat a great amount of the proteins which contain high amounts of glutamic acid. My main source is chicken, which contains .65 grams/pound. So - I'm not too concerned about ingesting vast amounts of the stuff. And regardless of how much glutamic acid is in food - I am not supplementing with glutamic acid! I am talking about glutamine! And I trust that my body can figure out what to do with it once it's inside. It has so far!

2- "To heal what exactly?" ARE YOU SERIOUS??? I don't know if you've been paying attention to celiac disease or not, but one of the main goals is to heal the intestinal villi. That's what glutamine does. "The gastrointestinal tract is by far the greatest user of glutamine in the body, as enterocytes in the intestinal epithelium use glutamine as their principal metabolic fuel. Most of the research on glutamine and its connection to intestinal permeability has been conducted in conjunction with the use of TPN. Commercially available TPN solutions do not contain glutamine, which can result in atrophy of the mucosa and villi of the small intestine. Addition of glutamine to the TPN solution reverses mucosal atrophy associated with various gastrointestinal conditions. Research has demonstrated glutamine-enriched TPN decreases villous atrophy, increases jejunal weight, and decreases intestinal permeability. Trauma, infection, starvation, chemotherapy, and other stressors are all associated with a derangement of normal intestinal permeability." http://www.Lame Advertisement/p/articles/mi_...4_6/ai_78539420 I don't know if you've ever seen your villi. But I have seen mine. I went to the pathology lab at the University hospital last week to view the slides. When the pathology doctor was showing them to me I said, "Where are the villi??" She half grinned, and said, "Exactly." They weren't there. They were gone. According to her report: "Sections of the small bowel biopsy show extensive villous blunting rangeing from moderate villous blunting to complete flat atrophic mucosa. Only a rare intact villous structure is noted."

I'm fully intent on regaining the health of my intestinal tract. It would be nice to be able to absorb some nutrients without having to take massive vitamin doses. I am appalled that you even asked the question "to heal what exactly?" Hello! I have osteoporosis because I haven't been absorbing calcium. How about to heal that?!

Okay, I'm done for a while. I'll come back with more later.

Take care,

- Michelle

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Paul and Michelle, (also open to other contributors)

permit me to set you a little research task if you're game for it based on some little questions remaining in my mind:

i) the difference between glutamine and L-glutamine (I was told only the latter is suitable)

ii) the significance of the time intervals after and before eating - if one cuts those down or omits them does one come to harm or simply make the dose a little less effective

iii) I was told in the late 90s L-glutamine not only strengthened the intestinal membrane (helping to heal leaky gut along with various other remedies) but strengthened the brain-blood barrier against opioid peptides and indeed strengthens other membranes throughout the body ...

:)

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Michael -

Here's a little info for question 1: "Amino acids are water soluble and most can occur in two different forms: L-form or D-form. The "L" and "D" simply refer to the direction of the light rotation by the molecules of the amino acid. The L-form of an amino acid (from the word "levorotary") rotates light to the left and the D-form (from the word "dexorotary") rotates light to the right. Amino acids in the L-form are the natural form of amino acids found in living plant and animals tissues (dietary sources of protein), and are considered to be more compatible with human biochemistry. D-form amino acids, unlike the L-form, are absorbed very slowly into the bloodstream because they must be converted by the body to the L-form before being used and are not normally used. In some amino acids, the D-form has been suspected of inhibiting antibiotic function and suppressing the immune system. Occassionally, an amino acid also appears in the DL-form. The DL-form amino acid contains a 50/50 mix of both D- and L-form amino acids. For some amino acids, such as phenylalanine or methionine, this DL combination is better. / Generally we advocate the use of the L-form amino acid supplements. This form of amino acid is also called free-form, which means the amino acid supplement is already in its simplest form, and contains just that particular amino acid in its pure form, and not as part of a larger protein. Free-form amino acids are generally the best form for absorption throughout the body and brain." (The Healing Nutrients Within)

Generally - the L-form is the safest form, and sometimes the D-form can actually be toxic. Stick with the L-glutamine. It's definitely the best. ;)

#2 - The significance of the time intervals after and before eating -

The reason that you want to take amino acids on an empty stomach is for improved absorption. If you take them with other foods or nutrients, they have to "compete" to be absorbed. Also, with l-glutamine, I imagine that it's best to give it to the intestinal tract with nothing in the way :) That's the part that needs it! - I don't believe there is any danger in taking amino acids with food (as they are often *in* foods!) but it is best to assure absorption by taking them on an empty stomach.

#3 - Glutamine is necessary for healing damaged tissues. What you've heard about the intestinal membrane correlates with what I've found. Here's an easy-reader version about glutamine (too many complicated terms above! ;))

"Glutamine is found in large amounts in the muscles and is readily available when needed for the synthesis of skeletal muscle proteins. Because this amino acid helps to build and maintain muscle, supplemental glutamine is useful for dieters and bodybuilders. More importantly, it helps to prevent the kind of muscle-wasting that can accompany prolonged bed rest or diseases such as cancer and AIDS. This is because stress and injury (including surgical trauma) cause the muscles to release glutamine into the bloodstream. In fact, during times of stress, as much as one-third of the glutamine present in the muscles may be released. As a result, stress and/or illness can lead to the loss of skeletal muscle. If enough glutamine is available, however, this can be prevented. .... Supplemental L-glutamine can be helpful in the treatment of arthritis, autoimmune diseases, fibrosis, intestinal disorders, peptic ulcers, connective tissue diseases such as polymyositis and scleroderma, and tissue damage due to radiation treatment for cancer. L-glutamine can enhance mental functioning and has been used to treat a range of problems including developmental disabilities, epilepsy, fatigue, impotence, schizophrenia, and senility. L-glutamine decreases sugar cravings and the desire for alcohol, and is useful for recovering alcoholics." (from Prescription for Nutritional Healing, by James F. Balch, M.D. and Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C.)

I'll have to look into it's effect on strengthening the blood-brain barrier! I don't know :huh:

- Michelle :wub:

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Before saying something else, I just want to recall my first opinion on glutamine. Yes glutamine is good, taken naturally.in our meals. I am against any refined proteins

bellytimber, here is a site that explain question 1 and 2.

http://www.nutritiondynamics.com/cgi-bin/p...Glutamine+(Gln)

you just have to click on I accept to see the text; I don,t know why bean did not gave the hyperlink. Some information in the text are against glutamine intake…in child and in case of liver or kidney disease. Kidney disease are frequent in celiac disease according the book dangerous grains.

Your third question depends on wether or not glutamine supplements heals the leaky gut syndrome. If so, yes it help the blood brain barrier to.

Bean

both GABA and glutamine are absent of my diet? OH oH, jesus ch… I go right away to my health food store buy L glutamine, I don’t want to die…

Seriously, have a look at this:

• A high protein diet provides a big whack of glutamine as it is. In fact, if you follow standard bodybuilding protein recommendations, about 10% of your total dietary protein intake is composed of glutamine (milk proteins are composed of somewhere between 3 — 10% glutamine while meat is composed of about 15% glutamine). This means that a high protein diet (400g/day) already provides me with about 40g of glutamine.

http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/qa/afc/afc_nov082002.htm

let’ make some calculation. I am low carber as it is recommend by kaufmann to heal autoimmunes diseases( celiac disease is called a autoimmune disease). I eat not less than 1000g of meat a day. According to that text, I am eating150g of glutamine. And as you know, when you eat meat, there is not more than 25 % of protein. The rest is …I don’t know. It’s not fat and it’s not carb also but I presume this 75% of unknown food prevent excess concentration of protein in the same place at the same time. Ever done a search on Nox? A gaz created by some protein when digesting but when in to high concentration, irritating your gi tract, thus inducing cell death…leads to fungal infection.

Now what was my point with mad cow disease and glutamine. The point with fungal diseases and with glutamine is they are both found together.You can find glutamine in brewers yeast saccaromyce cervisae. They are actually making search on this popular yeast and they have already discoverded at least 4 prion like related to that yeast. Follow me? I Am talking about yeast they use to make bread and beer. HOW ABOUT A PIECE OF WHEAT BREAD? The idea is to remove what can hurt from our diet. I cant remove all carbs from my diet since fruits and veggies are full of carb. But I can avoid refined sugar. I have removed gluten from my diet because it binds candida to my gi tract. May be the same principle should apply here concerning L-glutamine refined protein. Glutamine to heal what exactly? The absorbtion problem? Here’s something that had made it’s proof against the absorbtion problem and against fungal disease

taken from the fungus link, by doug kaufmann and david hollandp.A19;

People with gut problems, i.e., constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, reflus, etc., almost certainly have an inflamed or leaky gut. Psyllium hulls can greatly assist in sealing up the leaky gut. Once the bowels are moving properly and the intestines are sealed, one can begin to absorb and assimilate nutrient from food. The use of organic foods is then recommended, since these are known to contain more nutrients.

:(

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http://www.nutritiondynamics.com/cgi-bin/p...Glutamine+(Gln)

LUAP - you just have to click on I accept to see the text; I don,t know why bean did not gave the hyperlink.

Bean didn't give the link because Bean didn't use one. There are other sources for information besides the internet FYI.

LUAP - Some information in the text are against glutamine intake…in child and in case of liver or kidney disease. Kidney disease are frequent in celiac disease according the book dangerous grains.

I had already noted this in a previous post. See below: (or just look a couple posts back!)

p.p.s NOTE: "Glutamine should not be taken by persons with cirrhosis of the liver, kidney problems, Reye syndrome, or any other disorder that can result in an accumulation of ammonia in the blood." (The Healing Nutrients Within)

LUAP - both GABA and glutamine are absent of my diet? OH oH, jesus ch… I go right away to my health food store buy L glutamine, I don’t want to die…

Look, there's really no reason to be a jerk here alright? Here is the quote I took that from: "Glutamic acid is plentiful in foods, whereas glutamine and GABA are absent." This is in the book The Healing Nutrients Within. I have read (in various places) that glutamine is in our diet also - but I'm assuming that it's simply created in our bodies through the plentiful glutamic acid. I could be wrong. I am not a scientist or a dietician. (If you had been paying attention, you would have noticed that I said that glutamine and GABA are amino acids derived from glutamic acid. I forgot to state that glutamic acid can also be derived from glutamine and GABA.) Anyway, most of the sources from which I've found info saying that glutamine is in the diet are from people I don't know anything about. I trust the information in this book because of the education of the authors - Eric Braverman, M.D. who graduated with honors from New York Univ. and has since written over 80 research papers, Carl Pfeiffer, M.D., PhD, who pioneered the biochemical basis of behavior and mental illness, Kenneth Blum, PhD, who is world renown for his work on the role of neurotransmitters in compulsive/addictive behaviors and genetics. He is also a professor of pharmacology at the U. of San Antonio Texas. This book focuses soley on the use of amino acids to aid healing. At the end of the book there are 103 pages of peer reviewed studies backing their information. I trust them a whole hell of a lot more than something I find on google. Give me a break.

Also notice that I *never* said that it's impossible to get glutamine from your diet and I specifically stated that it can be synthesized from glutamic acid which is plentiful in the diet. I made the point that *I* probably don't get that much because I don't eat gluten, dairy products, or a lot of meat - the main sources of glutamic acid - or glutamine, if you want to think that way.

LUAP - Now what was my point with mad cow disease and glutamine. The point with fungal diseases and with glutamine is they are both found together.

SO?? Blood and viruses are found together. That doesn't mean that blood is bad! That doesn't mean that blood creates viruses. Yet it does provide them with the environment in which to reproduce - just like glutamine provides (according to you) the environment for fungus to reproduce.

LUAP - I Am talking about yeast they use to make bread and beer. HOW ABOUT A PIECE OF WHEAT BREAD?

How about talking about something I actually eat. Wheat bread & beer are pretty irrelevant at this point.

LUAP - The absorbtion problem? Here’s something that had made it’s proof against the absorbtion problem and against fungal disease

Here's something that is offered as proof of assisting the villi to heal: the previous links I've offered (specifically those dealing with parenteral nutrition). These are completed studies specifically showing that glutamine assists the regeneration of villi! And psyllium husks aid the body in healing by clearing out waste, not by providing the nutrition necessary for the villi to regenerate.

LUAP - According to that text, I am eating150g of glutamine. And as you know, when you eat meat, there is not more than 25 % of protein. The rest is …I don’t know. It’s not fat and it’s not carb also but I presume this 75% of unknown food prevent excess concentration of protein in the same place at the same time. Ever done a search on Nox? A gaz created by some protein when digesting but when in to high concentration, irritating your gi tract, thus inducing cell death…leads to fungal infection.

Sorry, but I have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

Okay. I'm done here. I'm not going to argue with you over glutamine anymore. Especially when you don't even read my posts and get upset with me for not saying things that I've said! Come on! At this point you are accomplishing nothing more than simply pissing me off. If that was your goal, you have succeeded. Congratulations.

As for taking glutamine - I am absolutely going to continue taking it until I feel that my villi have healed. You can choose to not take it. I am really not concerned about what you do. It's best that you continue following your own path if that's what you believe will help you. As a serious meat eater, you probably are gettting enough glutamine. It's a good thing you don't have to worry about any stress on your body or diseases that might increase your need for it! (read: duh!) But for those of us who don't eat a ton of meat, gluten, or dairy products - AND have compromised systems due to intestinal damage, I think it's a wise decision to supplement with l-glutamine.

BYE!

- Michelle

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I eat not less than 1000g of meat a day. According to that text, I am eating150g of glutamine. And as you know, when you eat meat, there is not more than 25 % of protein. The rest is …I don’t know. It’s not fat and it’s not carb also but I presume this 75% of unknown food prevent excess concentration of protein in the same place at the same time.

Whew! That's a lotof protein! :-) I get, maybe 80g of protein a day - none of it from dairy, and *maybe* half of that from meat. (The rest being from vegetables and grains/legumes.)

The majority of the population definitely doesn't consume 400g (mentioned previously in your reply) of protein a day.

(I'm not actually commenting on the L-glutamine supplementation issue... I simply don't know. Just pointing out that most people do not have a diet similar to yours, so what's right for them, might not be right for you, and what's right for you might not be right for them.)

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AN INCREASE IN BRAIN GLUTAMINE CAN CAUSE AN INCREASE IN THE RELEASE OF GLUTAMATE BY THE NEURON INTO THE SPACE BETWEEN THE NEURON. IF THE INCREASE IS NOT CONTROLLED AND MODULATED CORRECTLY BY THE THE BRAIN AND NERVOUS SYSTEM THEN THE RESULT WILL BE A PHENOMENON KNOWN AS GLUTAMATE EXCITOTOXICITY. GLUTAMATE EXITOTOXICITY IS THE NECROSIS (premature death) OF NEURON BY PAROXYSMAL OVERACTIVITY (OVER EXITATION) BY GLUTAMATE.

http://www.newtreatments.org/loadlocal.php?hid=974

My opinion is everyone who consider taking protein supplement should read the book (Excitotoxins the taste that kills) before swallow any of thoses. I am amazed by all the web sites promoting glutamine and protein supplement.

I would consider the fact that my body is already full of glutamine, glutamate and glutamic acid, because of its presence everywhere in food. Therefore, why should I risk food poisoning. To heal what exactly?

May be you should ask your governator about his stomach and see what protein supplement did to his brain and second brain, where most neurons are.

;)

I didn't read the whole page yet, but you did read this section on his page didn't you?

Glutamine taken in small sub-gram quantities or with meals containing complete proteins is not at issue, nor is such supplementation likely to result in an increase in GH release. Occasional or temporary glutamine supplementation is also not at issue, nor is glutamine taken for medicinal purposes or for supporting the unique needs of athletes. This page concerns only the practice of chronic megadosing with glutamine by people who are not deficient in the substance, as defined above.

The as defined above doesn't fit either.

Also, I see absolutely no references anywhere on his page (I will admit there's not much here either). Where is he getting his information from? I couldn't find anything in my simple searches of PubMed, but I would be interested in learning more if you do have references to studies. I did find one related study though "Creatine supplementation lowers brain glutamate levels in Huntington's disease." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...bstr&query_hl=4

Finally, from what I have read so far about glutamine, the majority of it gets used up or eliminated by the GI anyway.

Thanks,

Mike

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I have to agree with bean who says L Glutamine is good for you. Or, maybe not everyone, depending on your own body.

I have to admit that I was taking a signifigant amount of LG and I never felt better--ever. I was the healthiest I ever felt. I started taking LG with other vitamins/minerals, after seing a TOP, TOP nutritionist. This nutritionist was brilliant--he knew all about Celiac and created my own special diet and vitamin regime. I used to take LG before 3 meals a day (morning/noon/night) and never had any problems---only good effects. As a matter of fact Im glad you guys were talking about LG....it reminds me to continue taking them and not being so lazy!!!!

As for your arguments......

No one should be so obnoxious in their reponses to ANY argument involving Celiac. We are ALL in it together, right???? We should be supportive. If some one says something you dont agree with, so what? Read it and move on!!! Why bother arguing like that, when theres so much more important things going on in our world (for ex. the horrible tragedy in London), especially if you live in NYC (where I do) and have bigger fears affecting me than the nitty gritty, scientific details about LG. An argument can be made in favor or against ANYTHING....

bean, you've helped me so far......I like what you have to offer us fellow Celiacs. Why not just take these type of things "with a GRAIN (haha) of salt?"

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    • Thanks Stephanie & Gemini for the info. that the 4 of 5 doesn't apply to children. I wasn't aware of that until now. 
    • I think the posters above have given you very good information and I will throw in my 2 cents worth.  I am surprised that they did not test her DGP IgA also.  I am sure that would have been positive.  They switched off with antibody classes and usually they do both tests for both antibodies.  IgA is more specific to Celiac but the IgG is also useful.  The testing shows your daughter is producing antibodies to the gluten in her diet. (DGP IGG). THe tTg shows positive for some damage or inflammation. You know........your daughter is only 4.  She hasn't been on the planet or eating gluten that long. It can take years for enough damage to occur for it to be able to be found on biopsy.  I would say it is highly likely that this is Celiac, especially with her symptoms. But because the damage hasn't graduated to bad enough yet, they won't diagnose her. I think you need to do what others have said and get all copies of testing and find someone else who will take a look and give a diagnosis, especially if they have you do a dietary trial and her symptoms go away.  That might be the only recourse if you want faster proof. I know I would want faster.  I would not really be happy if I thought I had to keep feeding her something that was making her sick.  If you keep her on gluten long enough, the diarrhea will probably show up. BTW.........the criteria mentioned regarding diagnosis does not apply to kids.  I know it's silly and stupid but most leading Celiac specialists do not go by this criteria for kids.......adults only.  Keep that in mind because it might come up.  You could recognize it but they might not. Have you considered gene testing, to help bolster a diagnosis? As far as false positives go, it's the other way around. False negatives happen more frequently than many people think.  It's a recurring theme here.  With her symptoms, which is what I had, a bloated belly and tummy aches are telling.  Have they tested her for lactose intolerance?  That can cause similar symptoms, although it sure won't raise those 2 blood tests.  Keep looking for Celiac because there are many red flags here.
    • This 4 out of 5 criteria does not apply to children. I was never given a reason why, but it isn't.     That said, you may try to get a second opinion from another GI who may be willing to give her a firm dx.  We were in your boat 6 years ago and while I'm sure I'll get slammed for it, I wish we had kept gluten in our kiddos diet till he scoped positive for a variety of reasons.  Again, even family is different and you have to find what is best for you!
    • Mnoosh, I had swollen lymph nodes prior to celiac dx and for a while after going gluten free. My neck as well as groin. The groin ones were the worst. Guess what? All gone! It's hard to recall a time line & consider that everyone is different but I think mine completely resolved within a year.  You've been given great information. Just breathe and then again, breathe. You're going to be fine. 
    • It is the only thing you have eaten, so it can't be anything else?  I eat it with no issues so I am not sure how you can be certain that is the problem.  All I am saying is that its sort of "your word against mine and the company's word".  
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