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L-glutamine


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#1 bean

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 08:49 AM

Hello :) I've been meaning to post about L-Glutamine for some time, both for others & to remind myself why I need to be taking it. I hope that you will find this information useful :)

A long time ago I started taking L-glutamine when I was doing a lot of weight lifting, because it helps your tissues to heal, increases immunity, makes you feel good, etc. I later learned that it helps your intestinal tract, and am excited to write about how it can help those of us with celiac disease!!

This first part is from Ron Hoggan & James Braly (authors of Dangerous Grains):


Glutamine for Villous Atrophy and a Leaky Gut

L-glutamine, the most abundant amino acid in the blood, brain, and skeletal muscle, is a tasteless, nontoxic, conditionally essential amino acid that appears to be showing promise in the treatment of celiac disease. Research demonstrates that glutamine is the primary fuel for the lining of the small instestine and immune system.

When given in therapeutic doses (9-20) grams a day in divided doeses), it also releases growth hormone and increases the production of a powerful, detoxifying, antioxidant enzyme called glutathione peroxidase. Glutamine also seems to protect the intestinal lining from the destructive action of alcohol, NSAIDS, and aspirin. It has been reported that glutamine is now the most popular anti-ulcer medication in Asia because it heals and helps prevent peptic ulcers. In a recent study in Japan, 92 percent of ulcer patients given 1,600 mg of glutamine a day showed complete healing of duodenal and peptic ulcers in four weeks. It is also currently being administered intravenously to patients receiving major abdominal and bone marrow surgery, therapy for third-degree burns, and chemotherapy or radiation for cancer.

From our perspecitive, the single most promising benefit of glutamine is that, when removed from the diet, it may prevent and reverse villous atrophy, a leaky gut, and the malabsorption of nutrients so commonly seen in celiac disease and Crohn's disease.

We would conjecture that glutamine's primary value will not be to substitute a gluten-free diet, but to help accelerate healing when initially going off gluten and to lessen intestinal inflammation when gluten is inadvertently or intentionally reintroduced back into the diet.


More to come.. ;)
- Michelle :wub:

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Michelle :)

Positive blood tests 4/29/05 (tTG & IgA)
*Osteoporosis (at 32!)
*Heartburn/Reflux (*ouch!*)
*Lifelong battle w/depression
*Dental enamel didn't form right when I was little (cavities cavities cavities)
*Neuropsych analysis lists all sorts of learning disabilities - which may be attributed to brain injury from an old accident or may be from celiac, who knows!

Had biopsy May 11th, 2005 - villi are FLAT! :(
gluten-free since May 11th :)

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#2 bean

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 09:02 AM

Okay, this is a little more technical but worth reading:

Gastrointestinal Disease

The gastrointestinal tract is by far the greatest user of glutamine in the body, as enterocytes in the intestinal epithelium use glutamine as their principal metabolic fuel. Most of the research on glutamine and its connection to intestinal permeability has been conducted in conjunction with the use of TPN. Commercially available TPN solutions do not contain glutamine, which can result in atrophy of the mucosa and villi of the small intestine. Addition of glutamine to the TPN solution reverses mucosal atrophy associated with various gastrointestinal conditions.[3] Research has demonstrated glutamine-enriched TPN decreases villous atrophy, increases jejunal weight, and decreases intestinal permeability.[4,5] Trauma, infection, starvation, chemotherapy, and other stressors are all associated with a derangement of normal intestinal permeability. One potential consequence of increased intestinal permeability is microbial translocation. Bacteria, fungi, and their toxins may translocate across the mucosal barrier into the bloodstream and cause sepsis.[6] In numerous animal studies of experimentally induced intestinal hyperpermeability, the addition of glutamine or glutamine dipeptides (stable dipeptides of glutamine with alanine or glycine) to TPN improved gut barrier function, as well as immune activity in the gut.[7] Conditions characterized by increased intestinal permeability that might benefit from glutamine supplementation include food allergies and associated conditions, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. A clinical study of ulcerative colitis patients demonstrated that feeding 30 g daily of glutamine-rich germinated barley foodstuff (GBF) for four weeks resulted in significant clinical and endoscopic improvement, independent of disease state. Disease exacerbation returned when GBF treatment was discontinued.[8] It has also been suggested that cabbage juice consumption may provide benefit to patients with gastric ulcers and gastritis, by virtue of its high glutamine content.


(taken from: http://www.Lame Adve...4_6/ai_78539420 )

BTW - "TPN" is total parenteral nutrition - it is used for people who cannot get their nutrition through eating (think IV). Those of us who *can* get out nutrition through eating will benefit from l-glutamine supplements.

Okay, let me go find more.. :)
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#3 bean

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 09:31 AM

If you are interested in this, I *highly* suggest L-Glutamine from Jarrow. It is pharmaceutical grade, pure, and inexpensive (particularly at webvitamins.com). Here is a link to their l-glutamine powder:

http://www.jarrow.co...aminePowder.htm

I also wrote to them asking if their l-glutamine was safe for celiacs and received a letter stating that their glutamine products are free of gluten.

:)

Oh, BTW - the search function at webvitamins SUCKS! Here is a link to the page you want: http://www.webvitami...did=195&page=19 - and then is one other glutamine products on the next page.

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#4 bean

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 05:32 PM

So does nobody care about this? :(
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#5 granny

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 09:16 PM

So does nobody care about this? :(

Hey Michel, don't take it personally, we all get busy and don't read every day.
I found your info very interesting and I actually have some of the L-glutimine and tried it. I was having a hard time and it got worse so decided to stop it for awhile.
I may try it again now that I'm doing better. granny
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#6 Jnkmnky

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 09:26 PM

Oh boy. I'm attempting to wade through the Dangerous Grains and China Study books all at once! :o I'm going to pencil in Lglutamine for JULY!! I'm very appreciative for all the info you've posted. You should write your own book! You're very knowledgable on a variety of topics I'm currently looking into. When I see your posts, I don't always respond to them, but I'm off at Barnes and Noble trying to find the books I need to educate myself. So, I'm off now to ponder the benefits of a gluten-free/cf lifestyle change for my entire family some more.
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#7 KaitiUSA

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 05:31 AM

Just because someone may not respond does not mean they do not find the information very helpful.
I take this supplement and we have heard nothing but good things about it :D
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Kaiti
Positive bloodwork
Gluten-free since January 2004
Arkansas

Jeremiah 29:11- "For I know the plans that I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for you to prosper and not harm you,plans to give you a hope and future"

"One Nation, Under God"

Feel free to email me anytime....jkbrodbent@yahoo.com

#8 jenvan

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 05:48 AM

wow..., so kaiti you take this. what have you personally noticed from taking it? i could use some extra help myself :)
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Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005
dairy-free

#9 bean

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 07:56 AM

Thanks guys :)

I forgot to add something: If you do take it, the timing is really important. You need to take it on an empty stomach. Thirty minutes before or two hours after a meal. I take mine in powder form dropped in a glass of almond or soy milk. I use the powder so I can get a high dose w/o lots of pills.

Also - for those who've had problems with it. You need to be *really* careful about gluten contamination from this - as glutamine is frequently derived from wheat protein. That's the reason I put up the Jarrow information - I know it's safe. (And effective!)

Glutamine has a LOT of other benefits that could be helpful to us (as celiacs). We need glutamine more than people who don't have problems with their intestinal lining - a lot of it. Our intestines use glutamine for a food source, and if they don't receive enough of it they are unable to heal. And obviously, if our intestinal tract isn't happy - we aren't able to absorb things & that leads to us being unhappy!

Not only that - but glutamine does a lot of other things (besides heal the intestine)! It really is a wonderful supplement. I slacked off for a while, but am definitely going to start taking it religiously again :)

I have a book that deals with the various amino acids (The Healing Nutrients Within - by Eric Braverman, M.D.). Some of the clinical uses suggested for glutamine include: Aging and Mental Performance, Alcoholism, Alzheimers Disease, Anxiety, Appetite Suppression, Benigh Prostatic Hypertrophy, Cancer, Depression, Diabetes & Hypoglycemia, Encephalopathy, Hypertension, Involuntary Muscular Movement Syndromes, Schizophrenia, Seizure Disorders, Stroke, Gout, Migraine... etc.

Thanks for showing interest :) I did this post (kind of) for me so that I would see that I need to start taking it again and stop screwing around. But then I realized how much I wanted you guys to take it too. I want all of us to heal - not just me! :)

I love you guys :wub:

- Michelle :)

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Michelle :)

Positive blood tests 4/29/05 (tTG & IgA)
*Osteoporosis (at 32!)
*Heartburn/Reflux (*ouch!*)
*Lifelong battle w/depression
*Dental enamel didn't form right when I was little (cavities cavities cavities)
*Neuropsych analysis lists all sorts of learning disabilities - which may be attributed to brain injury from an old accident or may be from celiac, who knows!

Had biopsy May 11th, 2005 - villi are FLAT! :(
gluten-free since May 11th :)

#10 KaitiUSA

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 08:31 AM

wow..., so kaiti you take this. what have you personally noticed from taking it? i could use some extra help myself :)

I started taking it a while ago(around the time I was diagnosed- when I really needed some major help). I should be on it probably more then I am right now but I do take it. It seems to work really well. It's in one of the pills I take...it has a variety of things in it. I'll have to check on the name of it..I don't have the bottle near me at the moment. I'll let you know what all is in it. My mom is a big fan of it too. She is really knowledgable in supplements and has really done so much research about it...she definitely likes the supplement way rather then medications.
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Kaiti
Positive bloodwork
Gluten-free since January 2004
Arkansas

Jeremiah 29:11- "For I know the plans that I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for you to prosper and not harm you,plans to give you a hope and future"

"One Nation, Under God"

Feel free to email me anytime....jkbrodbent@yahoo.com

#11 turtle99

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 04:45 PM

Hey Bean,

I am very, very intersted in nutritional supplements and things that can help. thanks very much for the tip and all the great info on Glutimine.

I am definitely interested. I ordered the book dangerous grains, but still waiting for it to arrive.

Thanks for taking the time.
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"Turtle99"
gluten-free since may02/05

#12 LUAP

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 09:01 AM

AN INCREASE IN BRAIN GLUTAMINE CAN CAUSE AN INCREASE IN THE RELEASE OF GLUTAMATE BY THE NEURON INTO THE SPACE BETWEEN THE NEURON. IF THE INCREASE IS NOT CONTROLLED AND MODULATED CORRECTLY BY THE THE BRAIN AND NERVOUS SYSTEM THEN THE RESULT WILL BE A PHENOMENON KNOWN AS GLUTAMATE EXCITOTOXICITY. GLUTAMATE EXITOTOXICITY IS THE NECROSIS (premature death) OF NEURON BY PAROXYSMAL OVERACTIVITY (OVER EXITATION) BY GLUTAMATE.

http://www.newtreatm...cal.php?hid=974

My opinion is everyone who consider taking protein supplement should read the book (Excitotoxins the taste that kills) before swallow any of thoses. I am amazed by all the web sites promoting glutamine and protein supplement.

I would consider the fact that my body is already full of glutamine, glutamate and glutamic acid, because of its presence everywhere in food. Therefore, why should I risk food poisoning. To heal what exactly?

May be you should ask your governator about his stomach and see what protein supplement did to his brain and second brain, where most neurons are.



;)
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Canada
Where the health cares are free, but where the doctors worry more about their bank account than the health of their patients.
gluten-free since april 2003
On the no grain diet (Mercola) and initial phase diet (kaufmann) since january 2005. healthy since january 2005

#13 bean

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 12:14 PM

I hate that you've caught me when I'm away from my books ;) I will get back to you on this - absolutely, because I don't want anyone to be concerned.

But consider this:


Several stressors can result in a decrease of muscle glutamine levels. These stressors include, but are not limited to, burns, fasting, malnutrition, uncontrolled diabetes, infections, trauma, surgery, and intense exercise. Indeed, stress can result in a reduction of glutamine stores up to 50 percent (Di Pasquale, 1997).

In general, glutamine is the first amino acid to be compromised and the last one to be replaced. Intramuscular glutamine is sacrificed in order to preserve immune and organ function. The body does up-regulate the production of glutamine during times of stress, but in many cases the supply cannot keep pace with the demand. Besides depleting glutamine, other amino acids such as the branch chain amino acids are also compromised because they are used to replace glutamine through a series of enzymatic reactions. This, in turn, results in fewer amino acids for construction of skeletal muscle contractile proteins (Di Pasquale, 1997).


http://web.ask.com/r...snip&Complete=1

Remember that a lot of us with celiac disease are malnourished, uh? This is a condition that calls for increased amounts of l-glutamine. It is the primary food for the intestines - and often (particularly after initial diagnosis) people with celiac disease *need* additional healing nutrients.

I appreciate your response and concern, and I will consider it very strongly. But I do question it's validity in our situation.

I'll see what I can find to either support or refute your post :)

- Michelle

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#14 LUAP

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 03:20 PM

Let's talk about validity of not taking glutamine in coeliac situation. I will say so, and it's not because i want to win the argument. One of my favorite doctor: Mercola, recommend to take glutamine and i do believe he is wrong. Everybody can make mystake. let me tell you why, by another argumentation than the exitotoxin thing.

As i know things by now, there is two ways to get candida and other fungus problem. One is cell death (excitotoxins, free radicals, food poisoning), the second way is a combination of sugar and peptids or protein. As you mentioned in one of your text, hpw1 ,a gliadin portion, is now recognized to bind candida to the GI tract.

Let’s talk about the first brain now and the risk of eating refined protein such as glutamine.

Alzheimer diseaze is caracterized by a white coat at the surface of brain. Does it make you think of something else? that coat is supposed to be a coat of proteins. What protein are they?

Let’s go see another brain disease, the mad cow disease. You know that prion are causing mad cow disease.

"prions also occur naturally in some organisms (such as yeast) and may play important roles in their growth and development

Lev Osherovich and colleagues confirmed what others have seen, namely that an area rich in glutamine and asparagine was responsible for the aggregation and growth of prions-acting like a patch of Velcro that locks the misshapen proteins together."

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=97

have you already saw a mad cow in your tv screen: it shakes just like someone who has parkinson.

therefore, I really do believe we should not take glutamine supplement. IT creates a favorable environnement for fungal disease such as thoses mentioned above.
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Canada
Where the health cares are free, but where the doctors worry more about their bank account than the health of their patients.
gluten-free since april 2003
On the no grain diet (Mercola) and initial phase diet (kaufmann) since january 2005. healthy since january 2005

#15 Carriefaith

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 05:30 PM

I think it is always a good idea to research both sides of the story. Here are some good sites:

http://www.mercola.c...1/glutamine.htm
http://www.goaskalic...a.edu/3166.html

It may be a good idea to get glutamine levels checked, and if they are low, then talk to your doctor about taking supplements.
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Carrie Faith

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease in March 2004
Postitive tTg Blood Test, December 2003
Positive Biopsy, March 3, 2004


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