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Reading Labels In The UK


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4 replies to this topic

#1 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:33 AM

Hi All:

How does one read a label in the UK.
I do eat out in the UK (mostly Indian and Turkish) but I also stay with friend and cook for them.

What are the labelling laws regarding wheat in the UK?
Do they have to declare it?

Thanks for your answers!
  • 0
Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

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#2 irish daveyboy

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:30 AM

Hi All:

How does one read a label in the UK.
I do eat out in the UK (mostly Indian and Turkish) but I also stay with friend and cook for them.

What are the labelling laws regarding wheat in the UK?
Do they have to declare it?

Thanks for your answers!


Yes wheat is declared in the ingredients and unlike the USA must list Barley, Spelt, Rye, Oats or Tricale.

Plus they may have a alert box which could say 'may contain traces of' or 'manufactured in a facility which also handles'
.
Products that state gluten-free contain less than 20PPM of contaminant (0 PPM is impossible to test for)

Even though the limit is <20PPM the products may in fact register no traceable gluten (lowest test levels currently = 5PPM)

The term suitable fot Coeliacs refers to the previous allowable level <200PPM.

Codex Legislation reguires that Europe and the US + Canada adopt the new Codex level of <20PPM gluten-free suitable for most Coeliacs and <100PPM Very Low Gluten suitable for some Coeliacs.

ALWAYS Read the ingredients list as these can change due to re-formulation.

Best Regards,
David
  • 0
Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.
Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests
Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.
Self Taught Baker.
Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

#3 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 10:26 AM

Thank you David.

I stay with friends who don't like to cook and so I am more than happy to cook for them.
I usually take care of the grocery shopping when I do because, well, it's always the best thing to be a good and generous house guest.

When I am next at a Tescos or a Sainsburys I will look out for the packaging labels.
What a great thing to mention barley, rye, oats, spelt and triticale as well.
Much more progressive than we are here in the US.

Your reply is most appreciated,
~Allison
  • 0
Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

#4 India

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 01:57 PM

I'm not so sure about Tesco but Sainsbury's are very good about labelling their own products for both ingredients and potential cross-contamination. I noticed in the US that store brands seem to be considered inferior but UK supermarket own brand products are pretty good quality.
  • 0

Self diagnosed but confirmed by biopsy
Gluten free Jan 2010
MSG free Jan 2010
Corn free Apr 2010
Soy free Jun 2010
Following a FODMAPS plan

Also have RSI, widespread myofascial pain and hypermobility problems

#5 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 02:06 PM

I'm not so sure about Tesco but Sainsbury's are very good about labelling their own products for both ingredients and potential cross-contamination. I noticed in the US that store brands seem to be considered inferior but UK supermarket own brand products are pretty good quality.


Thank you India.
Most ingredients I cook with are inherently gluten-free and that is the way that I cook when I am with friends in the UK.
But for other stuff I am curious and concerned.
Tescos and Sainsburys seem to be comporable in most things, so I will check out what is nearer to me.

Your labelling practices seem to be years ahead of us.
Thank you for your reply,
~Allison
  • 0
Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.




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