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Making Superfine Brown Rice Flour?
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Call me cheap but no way am I paying $13 in shipping for 3lbs of already really over priced flour. I mean come on, $25 for 3 lbs of flour? NO.WAY. Can't I just put regular brown rice flour in a coffee/spice grinder to make it finer? or can I put it though a mill?

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Call me cheap but no way am I paying $13 in shipping for 3lbs of already really over priced flour. I mean come on, $25 for 3 lbs of flour? NO.WAY. Can't I just put regular brown rice flour in a coffee/spice grinder to make it finer? or can I put it though a mill?

If you are looking for a flour sub for baking, skip the blend that gluten-free cookbooks call for and get Le Garden Bakery's Quick Mix. It's a cup-for-cup flour substitute for any TRADITIONAL baking recipe. No need to use a gluten-free recipe anymore!

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If you are looking for a flour sub for baking, skip the blend that gluten-free cookbooks call for and get Le Garden Bakery's Quick Mix. It's a cup-for-cup flour substitute for any TRADITIONAL baking recipe. No need to use a gluten-free recipe anymore!

I think the point was to avoid the ridiculous shipping rates everyone charges. Le Garden charges 13.45 to my state for 1.1/2 lbs of their flour.

The u.s.p.s. rate for regular shipping for up to 3lbs is roughly $5, I know because I checked today because I am planning on shipping some frozen UDI's to an Aunt with celiac disease who can't get it. So yes, they are taking advantage of our situation.

Has anyone tried a grind or mill brown rice flour to superfine ? I would like to know myself as I have neither appliance to try it and don't want to invest in one for this experiment.

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I think the point was to avoid the ridiculous shipping rates everyone charges. Le Garden charges 13.45 to my state for 1.1/2 lbs of their flour.

The u.s.p.s. rate for regular shipping for up to 3lbs is roughly $5, I know because I checked today because I am planning on shipping some frozen UDI's to an Aunt with celiac disease who can't get it. So yes, they are taking advantage of our situation.

Has anyone tried a grind or mill brown rice flour to superfine ? I would like to know myself as I have neither appliance to try it and don't want to invest in one for this experiment.

Exactly, there a newbie spamming there biz is all, ignore it:) I did grind some of Bobs brown rice flour up and it is much more powdery but I don't know how it compares to Authentic Foods grind. If I have time tonight I'll bake something with it and see what happens.

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Exactly, there a newbie spamming there biz is all, ignore it:) I did grind some of Bobs brown rice flour up and it is much more powdery but I don't know how it compares to Authentic Foods grind. If I have time tonight I'll bake something with it and see what happens.

Brown rice is really hard to get ground into a fine powder. I have already killed 2 coffee grinders trying to do so. I quit trying after that. I suppose if you want to spend like $130 or so for a grain mill, you could go to town without any fuss. But I have so far refused to cough up that much money just to grind my own flours.

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Brown rice is really hard to get ground into a fine powder. I have already killed 2 coffee grinders trying to do so. I quit trying after that. I suppose if you want to spend like $130 or so for a grain mill, you could go to town without any fuss. But I have so far refused to cough up that much money just to grind my own flours.

If the recipes from Annalise's book turn out to be a good as people are telling me it might be worth it to shell out the money. Its basically $25 for a 3lb bag. That's around $8lb, a really good flour mill is around $250. So for the cost of around 30lbs of flour it would pay for itself. We bake a lot so for me that would be worth it but I'd rather not shell out that kind of money you know?

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I use my vitamix to grind up brown rice, white rice, millet, etc. Not sure if it would qualify as superfine, since I'm not really sure what that means, but it sure makes it in to flour and I use it a lot. I'm going to get some buckwheat and try grinding that next, can't wait!

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If the recipes from Annalise's book turn out to be a good as people are telling me it might be worth it to shell out the money. Its basically $25 for a 3lb bag. That's around $8lb, a really good flour mill is around $250. So for the cost of around 30lbs of flour it would pay for itself. We bake a lot so for me that would be worth it but I'd rather not shell out that kind of money you know?

I have Annalise's Baking book and her recipe's are good, IMO. FYI I use regular brown rice flour not superfine. Of course using superfine would be better but still they are pretty good as is. Would you like a sample recipe to try ?

Just a note about the book, this is a high fat, high caloric just like homemade, feel good baking recipe book . I tried to make healthier substitutes but nothing worked. I even email her to ask about how to make the recipes a little more waist friendly

and was told, and I quote " If you want a low-fat recipe buy a low-fat recipe book, that was not my intent when I wrote the book"

Since I disliked the tone of her response I will never buy another book of hers. That being said the recipes are good but watch out for the calories and fat.

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I have Annalise's Baking book and her recipe's are good, IMO. FYI I use regular brown rice flour not superfine. Of course using superfine would be better but still they are pretty good as is. Would you like a sample recipe to try ?

Just a note about the book, this is a high fat, high caloric just like homemade, feel good baking recipe book . I tried to make healthier substitutes but nothing worked. I even email her to ask about how to make the recipes a little more waist friendly

and was told, and I quote " If you want a low-fat recipe buy a low-fat recipe book, that was not my intent when I wrote the book"

Since I disliked the tone of her response I will never buy another book of hers. That being said the recipes are good but watch out for the calories and fat.

Thank you for the heads up, that type of response would piss me too too. I got the book for pretty much the bread recipes which don't look to high in fat although I just noticed she didn't bother putting in a nutrition break down after each recipe which is a bit annoying as that's rather important info for us since I'm trying to lose weight and we have to do low fat. I can't remember the last time I got a cook book without that info for each recipe.

oh yes, should she make another book and you want it without her getting her royalty becasue of her attitude, just by it 2nd hand from a private seller online so you still get the book without spiting yourself:) I mean I may not like aunt Suzie but I'll be darned if I'm gonna deprive myself of her cake recipe becasue of it:) lol:)

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If the recipes from Annalise's book turn out to be a good as people are telling me it might be worth it to shell out the money. Its basically $25 for a 3lb bag. That's around $8lb, a really good flour mill is around $250. So for the cost of around 30lbs of flour it would pay for itself. We bake a lot so for me that would be worth it but I'd rather not shell out that kind of money you know?

I totally know. ;) I could buy tons of brown rice for dirt cheap and grind my own, too. I'm just too cheap to pay that much right now. Then again, I can get Bob's red mill brown rice flour without any trouble around here, so I just go with that.

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I know this topic is some months old. I just wanted to comment on using 'regular' brown rice flour for the recipes in Annalise's cookbook. I've noticed some people mention they can just go get brown rice flour easily, like Bob's Red Mill. If you want your gluten-free baked goods from this book to turn out almost very close to their gluten-filled counterparts, you CANNOT use regular brown rice flour. It WILL NOT WORK. Yes, the end result still might be palatable, but it is going to still taste like a gluten-free baked good. (Trust me, I tried to be thrifty, too, and do the same thing.) So if you're not concerned about this, then you can certainly use Bob's Red Mill or whatever is your favorite brand of brown rice flour. But if you're like me and you REALLY want to taste a cake that tastes like a cake, please save up the extra money, suck it up, and pay the shipping costs on Authentic Foods' brand. I know...I almost had a cow, too, when I went to Amazon and saw how much the shipping costs were. But it's definitely worth it if you aren't baking tons of cakes and pies every day and do not want to fork out the money for a mill. BTW...I've tried putting Bob's Red Mill brown rice flour in my food processor to get it superfine--doesn't work. It does get more powdery, as someone above mentioned, but it still doesn't give you a superfine texture. Authentic Foods is almost like a wheat flour in how powdery and fine it is. It's WAY less gritty. HTH

The other option is to seek out recipes that do not use any rice flours. Sorghum is my absolute favorite flour to bake with. And when combined with almond flour, some amazing things can be created. Gluten Free Goddess has a wonderful blog and uses mainly these types of flours. Yes, they are a bit pricier than rice flours (and starches), but they can usually be found in your health food or grocery stores if they have a health food section like mine does. The almond flour is the one that's really expensive (or coconut if you use that). And many bakes also mix sorghum with buckwheat, quinoa, or millet if there are nut or coconut allergies present. The taste ends up being a littler 'nuttier', but the end results are usually much better than when using regular-grind rice flours.

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I know this topic is some months old. I just wanted to comment on using 'regular' brown rice flour for the recipes in Annalise's cookbook. I've noticed some people mention they can just go get brown rice flour easily, like Bob's Red Mill. If you want your gluten-free baked goods from this book to turn out almost very close to their gluten-filled counterparts, you CANNOT use regular brown rice flour. It WILL NOT WORK. Yes, the end result still might be palatable, but it is going to still taste like a gluten-free baked good. (Trust me, I tried to be thrifty, too, and do the same thing.) So if you're not concerned about this, then you can certainly use Bob's Red Mill or whatever is your favorite brand of brown rice flour. But if you're like me and you REALLY want to taste a cake that tastes like a cake, please save up the extra money, suck it up, and pay the shipping costs on Authentic Foods' brand. I know...I almost had a cow, too, when I went to Amazon and saw how much the shipping costs were. But it's definitely worth it if you aren't baking tons of cakes and pies every day and do not want to fork out the money for a mill. BTW...I've tried putting Bob's Red Mill brown rice flour in my food processor to get it superfine--doesn't work. It does get more powdery, as someone above mentioned, but it still doesn't give you a superfine texture. Authentic Foods is almost like a wheat flour in how powdery and fine it is. It's WAY less gritty. HTH

I have Annalise Roberts' cookbook but bought it mainly for the bread recipes. Neither Flour Mix A or B call for brown rice flour. I especially like the Multigrain Sandwich Bread.

I did grind some brown rice flour in a coffee mill but honestly can't remember what I made with it or if it worked. But then if I baked tons of cakes and pies every day, I'd have a lot more problems than the fineness or lack thereof of the brown rice flour. :P

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I am wondering if pre - soaking the brown rice flour in some of the liquid in the recipes would help soften it up for this ongoing grit problem some of you are having.

I am more of an almond/sorghum/amaranth/buckwheat/teff type of person, myself.

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King Arthur Flour has a recipe for Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread that uses a brown rice flour mix. I wonder if that's why their gluten-free breads require two rises...I would think the flour would absorb more of the moisture that way.

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I think the point was to avoid the ridiculous shipping rates everyone charges. Le Garden charges 13.45 to my state for 1.1/2 lbs of their flour.

The u.s.p.s. rate for regular shipping for up to 3lbs is roughly $5, I know because I checked today because I am planning on shipping some frozen UDI's to an Aunt with celiac disease who can't get it. So yes, they are taking advantage of our situation.

Has anyone tried a grind or mill brown rice flour to superfine ? I would like to know myself as I have neither appliance to try it and don't want to invest in one for this experiment.

Sorry, I can't answer the grinding brown rice flour to make it superfine question (am wondering about it myself), but as far the shipping issue:

Better Batter All-Purpose Gluten-Free Flour is a cup-for-cup substitute for regular all-purpose wheat flour and they just lowered their shipping charges to $5 for orders under $50 (from ~$10 iirc), and I believe the shipping is free if you order $50 or more. I just started using this flour in my old recipes from my pre-gluten-free-free days as a one-for-one substitute and really like it--doesn't have the gritty texture or bean aftertaste of some of the ones I've tried. It's very finely ground and powdery and already has the xanthan gum in it.

Other reasonable shipping charges: Vitacost sells Better Batter products as well as other gluten-free items and has a similar s&h rate scheme --$4.99 for orders under $49, free for orders $49 or more.

Amazon has free s&h for orders $25 or more (if the item is fulfilled by Amazon) and carries Better Batter and other gluten-free brands.

Another place that offers free shipping over $50 is 'Free From Gluten".

Netrition which carries various gluten-free brands has a flat rate for shipping of $4.95 no matter how much you order. They ship out quickly too--I always get my stuff the next day.

There are probably more, but those are the ones I currently know about.

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If you are looking for a flour sub for baking, skip the blend that gluten-free cookbooks call for and get Le Garden Bakery's Quick Mix. It's a cup-for-cup flour substitute for any TRADITIONAL baking recipe. No need to use a gluten-free recipe anymore!

Their blog post of March 25th says they are on a temporary sabbatical and their domain is for sale.

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I couldn't find it cheap enough - I just don't have the money! So I used a white rice flour that I found in a local market. I could tell by looking at it that it was superfine ground so I took a chance. I used it in her coconut layer cake and that cake was so delicious I couldn't even believe it. I know that it has fewer nutrients but honestly I don't eat cake for the nutrients :lol:

I am sorry if her response was rude regarding the low fat recipes. I guess I can understand her point though-when I eat cakes, pies, cookies and bread, I go for it :D Then try to reduce calories elsewhere. And since it is a pain in the booty to bake everything all the time, it won't be very often so I can indulge myself. I know what you mean about trying to lose weight, I actually gained weight since going gluten free--I think it is at least partially because my food is actually staying in my digestive tract long enough to absorb calories, instead of the D I was having constantly. It was my daughter's birthday, so I made this cake instead of getting one with gluten and staring longingly at it.

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After trying to blend my own, buying mixes and grinding (nobody ever said anything about a burr grinder, mine was $16 at my local Von's) my own, I'm done. Now I want to know WHICH store-bought blend is the best? How about the best for my health? All this white stuff gets me down. I will be ordering from Amazon so I have to order more than $25 worth to make it worth while. I am leaning toward Domata and if I do a revolving order it will be less. I will split this with a friend. I want to see if I get any replies to this post. Thanks in advance. I KNOW this gets old for some of you but the chance to teach never should!

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I just use a vitamixer to make flour. Takes about 5 or so minutes but is well worth it.

I don't use much premade mixes (outside of bisquick and my bread) because they sometimes contian bean flour.... and it doesn't like me very well :(

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I use my blender to make my brown rice flour mixture finer....I run the flour thru a few times and make sure it is well mixed, and is not staying at the bottom of the blender. I have thought of purchasing a Cuisinart Burr Mill....perhaps in the future I may. I honestly don't think that paying the high price for a superfine blend, is worth it. I had purchased a superfine brown rice mixture to use in a recipe, and did not notice much of a difference. I think the recipe you use and the varied ingredients for your cooking project makes the final difference.

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Not true about Amazon, IT IS NOT FREE SHIPPING! I checked and tried to order, still charged

$14 for shipping!? No matter how much I ordered. The flour is NOT coming from Amazon, they are

only the middle man.

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Call me cheap but no way am I paying $13 in shipping for 3lbs of already really over priced flour. I mean come on, $25 for 3 lbs of flour? NO.WAY. Can't I just put regular brown rice flour in a coffee/spice grinder to make it finer? or can I put it though a mill?

Hi Blue Taelon,

 

I have tried grinding rice flour in a coffee grinder and in a mill, and it is still not as fine as the Authentic Foods superfine rice flour. A matter of fact, it it still gritty. I hope this helps clarify this matter for you. The grain mill I used was the KitchenAid Grain Mill Attachment.

 

You can now purchase Authentic Foods superfine rice flours (white and brown) on Amazon for about $16 per 3 lbs. (including shipping).

 

Meanwhile, I find that there is no replacement for superfine rice flour. I use it for cakes, cupcakes, pie crust, pastry dough, shortbread crust, and more.

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