Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

When A Product Says It's Gluten Free But It's Not


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 inmygenes

inmygenes

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 13 October 2010 - 08:13 PM

Recently when I was in the States (I live in Canada), I noticed that a brand I trust Mary's crackers which says it's gluten free, also had a warning saying that it was prepared in a facility that also prepares products with wheat. This is a big concern for me, when I see Gluten Free on a label I expect it to be totally gluten free. It's hard to know what I can trust these days. Has anyone else had problems with products that claim to be gluten free?
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 seashele2

seashele2

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 89 posts

Posted 13 October 2010 - 09:54 PM

In the U.S., gluten-free doesn't necessarily mean zero gluten. While the FDA has not yet made their determination on labeling rules for gluten-free items, it is common practice to label anything gluten-free that has less than 20PPM (parts per million) of gluten protein. Anything under 20PPM is considered reaction-less for celiacs by most gastroenterologists.

Each country/area has their own rules for gluten-free designation. In Europe, they allow wheat starch in gluten-free items because the wheat starch has the protein processed out of it. I wouldn't put anything in my mouth that contained wheat starch, but apparently it isn't hurting European celiacs.
  • 0

#3 dilettantesteph

dilettantesteph

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,035 posts

Posted 14 October 2010 - 04:13 AM

Under 20 ppm is considered safe for most celiacs, but not all. There are some who react to much lower levels. I react to processed gluten free foods.

In the study used to get that figure of 20 ppm, one participant had to be removed from the study due to a clinical remission.

http://www.celiac.co...ents/Page1.html
  • 0

#4 psawyer

psawyer

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,047 posts

Posted 14 October 2010 - 06:47 AM

In the US, there is no regulatory definition of gluten-free in place yet.

In Canada, there is a defintion in place, but it refers only to intentional ingredients. It says nothing about possible accidential contamination.
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#5 cassP

cassP

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,655 posts

Posted 14 October 2010 - 08:35 AM

Under 20 ppm is considered safe for most celiacs, but not all. There are some who react to much lower levels. I react to processed gluten free foods.

In the study used to get that figure of 20 ppm, one participant had to be removed from the study due to a clinical remission.

http://www.celiac.co...ents/Page1.html


hmmm i guess this is why a lot of us feel better when we're eating naturally gluten free foods and not all the "treats/breads/cereals"... :( i try to keep them to a minimum, but it's hard
  • 0
1986- Elevated Speckled ANA/no Lupus.negative Sjorgens
2008- AntiGliadin IGA/IGg~ Negative,TTG IGA/IGg~ Weak Positive, Endomysial Antibody~ Positive, IGA Deficient.
no biopsy (insurance denied)
6/2010- Enterolab Gene Test:
HLA-DQB1 Allele 1 0302
HLA-DQB1 Allele 2 0302
HLADQ 3,3 (subtype 8,8)
7/2010- 100% Gluten Free
8/2010- DH
10/2010-Hypothyroid dx-> 12/2010 Hashimoto's dx + 1/11- Graves dx :(

#6 dilettantesteph

dilettantesteph

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,035 posts

Posted 15 October 2010 - 04:33 AM

It is a lot easier when they give you terrible symptoms. :P
  • 0

#7 Emilushka

Emilushka

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 453 posts

Posted 15 October 2010 - 04:37 AM

It is a lot easier when they give you terrible symptoms. :P


AMEN. That's the only reason I gave up my beloved cheese.
  • 0

#8 dilettantesteph

dilettantesteph

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,035 posts

Posted 16 October 2010 - 05:58 AM

AMEN. That's the only reason I gave up my beloved cheese.

I don't know if you are lactose intolerant or not but...

I thought that I was lactose intolerant but I looked at the lactose content of dairy and compared it to which dairy products bother me the most and it didn't make sense. I came across a study that found that breast milk can contain gluten.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....8?dopt=Abstract
I am one of those super sensitive celiacs. If breast milk can contain gluten, why not cows milk? Maybe that was it.

I found a local farmer who sells milk, cheese, yogurt, and butter made from cows who are pasture fed and supplemented with soy and corn and not gluten grains! (I have no issue with soy except when it is contaminated with gluten.)

Now I am enjoying all that stuff again. The only problems is that the Farmer's Market shuts down in two weeks and this guy lives two hours away. I need to figure something out!
  • 1

#9 BethM55

BethM55

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 298 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 10:32 AM

I don't know if you are lactose intolerant or not but...

I thought that I was lactose intolerant but I looked at the lactose content of dairy and compared it to which dairy products bother me the most and it didn't make sense. I came across a study that found that breast milk can contain gluten.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....8?dopt=Abstract
I am one of those super sensitive celiacs. If breast milk can contain gluten, why not cows milk? Maybe that was it.

I found a local farmer who sells milk, cheese, yogurt, and butter made from cows who are pasture fed and supplemented with soy and corn and not gluten grains! (I have no issue with soy except when it is contaminated with gluten.)

Now I am enjoying all that stuff again. The only problems is that the Farmer's Market shuts down in two weeks and this guy lives two hours away. I need to figure something out!



Milk, cheese, and butter can be frozen for longer storage. (although I find that once cheese has been frozen it tends to be very crumbly.) Yogurt is easy to make. How wonderful that you've found this farmer who is so conscientious about her dairy cows, and that you support her efforts. Good find!
  • 0
Self diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten free since 12/09.
Diagnosed with fibromyalgia about 15 years ago. Fibro symptoms have improved but not gone away with gluten free living.
Osteoarthritis, mostly in hands and neck and lumbar spine. Not sure if going gluten-free has helped that problem, but it certainly can't hurt. (Am very grateful that so far no sign of the RA that is devastating my mother lately.)
Considering a dairy free trial. Considering.

#10 inmygenes

inmygenes

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 01:42 PM

Under 20 ppm is considered safe for most celiacs, but not all. There are some who react to much lower levels. I react to processed gluten free foods.

In the study used to get that figure of 20 ppm, one participant had to be removed from the study due to a clinical remission.

http://www.celiac.co...ents/Page1.html


I can believe this as I seem to react to a very small amount. I usually avoid all products that say that they are processed in a facility that also processes wheat products. Here in Canada Gluten free usually means gluten free facilities as well.
  • 0

#11 inmygenes

inmygenes

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 01:45 PM

hmmm i guess this is why a lot of us feel better when we're eating naturally gluten free foods and not all the "treats/breads/cereals"... :( i try to keep them to a minimum, but it's hard


It is hard..and bakeries that bake with gluten and produce gluten free products are the worst. I didn't realize at first but now I avoid them. Some products are okay if the facilities are gluten free.
  • 0

#12 inmygenes

inmygenes

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 01:57 PM

In the US, there is no regulatory definition of gluten-free in place yet.

In Canada, there is a defintion in place, but it refers only to intentional ingredients. It says nothing about possible accidential contamination.


Thanks for this information. I'll certainly be checking the packaging of what I buy more carefully from now on.
  • 0

#13 inmygenes

inmygenes

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 01:58 PM

It is a lot easier when they give you terrible symptoms. :P


True!!
  • 0

#14 inmygenes

inmygenes

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 02:01 PM

I don't know if you are lactose intolerant or not but...

I thought that I was lactose intolerant but I looked at the lactose content of dairy and compared it to which dairy products bother me the most and it didn't make sense. I came across a study that found that breast milk can contain gluten.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....8?dopt=Abstract
I am one of those super sensitive celiacs. If breast milk can contain gluten, why not cows milk? Maybe that was it.

I found a local farmer who sells milk, cheese, yogurt, and butter made from cows who are pasture fed and supplemented with soy and corn and not gluten grains! (I have no issue with soy except when it is contaminated with gluten.)

Now I am enjoying all that stuff again. The only problems is that the Farmer's Market shuts down in two weeks and this guy lives two hours away. I need to figure something out!


Wow, that really opens up a can of worms! - I must admit that I've had some reactions to dairy and wondered if I should cut it out. Also the protein in dairy is quite similar to gluten apparently.
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: