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Pots Pans And Dishes Sharing


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20 replies to this topic

#1 revenant

 
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Posted 16 October 2010 - 05:31 PM

I've been gluten free for only 2 weeks but I get these moments of joint pain and lethargy. I'm wondering whether using the same dishes as my family (who still eats lots of dairy and gluten) can have traces of gluten or lactose? Anybody use their own dishes??
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#2 RideAllWays

 
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Posted 16 October 2010 - 05:33 PM

I shared plates/bowls with my family when I was living at home, but I had my own pot, fry pan and cutting board, as well as wooden spoons and stuff the commonly touch gluten, like strainers. I cook in the same glassware as them without a problem, but I always scrub them before using them!
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#3 Emilushka

 
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Posted 16 October 2010 - 05:56 PM

What I hear is that nonstick and wood retain gluten, whereas plastic and stainless steel don't. I use the same dishes as my gluten- and dairy-eating fiance, but those are all porcelain, plastic, or metal. I have my own pots, pans, and cooking utensils.
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#4 revenant

 
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Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:16 PM

Ok, thanks. It probably came from using pots for rice. We also have a very bad dishwasher, I don't think it's safe of me to use any of the same dishes (unless glass) because there is often things sticking to the dishes after they are washed.

I'm glad I know now what has been causing this
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#5 mushroom

 
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Posted 16 October 2010 - 07:08 PM

I see a lot of folks on this thread have covered a lot of what I was covering on your other thread. But I do want to reiterate that if you dip into a spread of any kind that someone else has dipped a knife in, and that knife has spread something on gluten, the spread would be contaminated.and you would be cc'd. Also, some soft plastics, e.g., cutting boards, scratch and retain gluten in the scratches.
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#6 Skylark

 
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Posted 16 October 2010 - 09:16 PM

Also, it just might take longer than two weeks. That's not long gluten-free at all.
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#7 revenant

 
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Posted 16 October 2010 - 10:24 PM

Also, it just might take longer than two weeks. That's not long gluten-free at all.


Hmm what do you mean by this? Am I still going to get random moments of multiple re-occurring symptoms until I'm gluten free for a longer period of time? Detox of a sorts?
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#8 Juliebove

 
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Posted 17 October 2010 - 01:20 AM

I don't have an issue with gluten, but do have a severe egg allergy. I got angry with my husband for the way he was cooking eggs. He was putting them in my Corelle bowls and microwaving them with no added fat. That meant they were welded onto the bowls and I just could not get them clean. So I bought paper bowls and told him to use only the paper bowls.

I then began using paper plates to do prep work with food like chopping.

And then I took it a step further. We now use paper bowls and plates for pretty much everything. Yes, I know it's not all that green but I feel that it is safer for my daughter and I. We both have food allergies and they are not necessarily the same.

I did replace some things but somewhat by default. For example, my crockpot quit working. So I bought a new one. Also asked for as a gift, a Rachel Ray pasta pot. And used a gift card to buy a very large skillet. And I bought daughter her own toaster.
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#9 Darn210

 
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Posted 17 October 2010 - 03:55 AM

First of all, I don't trust a dishwasher to truly get anything starchy off of a plate/pan once it has dried on. Yes, I am a major prewasher. I don't necessarily use soap, but everything is scrubbed pretty well before it even goes into the dishwasher. We share anything (nonporous) that I can scrub with steel wool. The only things that I have separate at my house are a couple of nonstick skillets. (Yes, I have separate toasters, cutting boards, strainers)


On a side note, one Thanksgiving I was at my BIL's house. I was helping cook (so I could keep an eye on everything ;) ) I got a big pot out of the cabinet for the potatos. Saw the big starch ring 1/3 the way down from the top of the pot. I asked my BIL if this was his pasta pot. He replied "yes" . . . did the "wow, never noticed that it leaves that ring" (and did reiterate that it had been thing that I was even remotely suspicious about . . . I'm lucky that my family (both mine and my husband's) are not overly sensitive to me getting bossy around food and dish/cookware.
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#10 Skylark

 
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Posted 18 October 2010 - 09:02 AM

Hmm what do you mean by this? Am I still going to get random moments of multiple re-occurring symptoms until I'm gluten free for a longer period of time? Detox of a sorts?

Not detox so much as it takes time for inflammation to heal. Early on, you could be getting gluten, or you could have just had a rough day and some of the leftover inflammation causes some joint pain and fatigue. It's great to be really careful with the diet until you figure out your level of sensitivity, but do give your body a month or two to really settle down.
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#11 Trymester

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:51 AM

I am about to embark on a DISCIPLINED gluten-free diet (finally). So, I have some pots which the whole family uses for everything. Should I just throw them away and get new ones OR, give them a really good scrubbing with soap (and any other cleaning agent you could recommend) and then make sure that no one other than me touches it?
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#12 Emilushka

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 02:19 PM

I am about to embark on a DISCIPLINED gluten-free diet (finally). So, I have some pots which the whole family uses for everything. Should I just throw them away and get new ones OR, give them a really good scrubbing with soap (and any other cleaning agent you could recommend) and then make sure that no one other than me touches it?


What kind of pots are they: stainless steel, nonstick, etc? The stainless steel can be cleaned effectively but nonstick retains gluten if it has ever been used to make a gluten-containing meal. For some reason the nonstick material binds gluten and permanently contaminates it.
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#13 psawyer

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 02:47 PM

[N]onstick retains gluten if it has ever been used to make a gluten-containing meal. For some reason the nonstick material binds gluten and permanently contaminates it.

Please provide an authoritative source for this claim. The only problem I have ever heard of is scratched coatings trapping gluten inside the scratches (a problem not unique to nonstick).
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Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
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#14 Emilushka

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 02:57 PM

Please provide an authoritative source for this claim. The only problem I have ever heard of is scratched coatings trapping gluten inside the scratches (a problem not unique to nonstick).


I honestly don't have one. I was warned by my GI doc about this. I never bothered to look because I heard from the doc and also from somewhere else on the web (don't remember where, but maybe this forum?)
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#15 psawyer

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 03:33 PM

Most GI doctors are not very educated on the details of the diet. I would not accept that claim without scientific evidence to back it up.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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