Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Are Some A Little Ocd?


  • Please log in to reply

21 replies to this topic

#16 Hamster101

 
Hamster101

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 28 posts
 

Posted 18 October 2010 - 12:18 PM

It can cause achy joints too? That would explain another underlying issue of the last two-three years.

To be honest, the cross contamination will not effect everyone. People will have a different sensitivity to the substance. Some may take a reasonable amount of the substance *like a few pieces of bread) to enter their system to coax a reaction while just a few crumbs could be trouble for others. My boss' better half is anaphylatic to dairy, whereas I need a glass to upset me.
  • 0
Dairy free: May '10
Gluten free: October '10


"When life gives you lemons, but you wanted lemonade, don't give up. Your dream is still possible, and it will be so much sweeter made with your own hands."

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 i-geek

 
i-geek

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 366 posts
 

Posted 18 October 2010 - 12:49 PM

To the OP: you know, it's funny. When I went gluten-free at the end of 2009 after being sick for months, I thought that people here must be OCD. Eating a salad after I'd picked the croutons off of it couldn't make me sick, that was crazy talk (until it happened: migraine, bloating, several days of GI distress, mouth sores, face breakouts, the works of my standard gluten reaction). Eating something that was made on shared equipment with wheat couldn't make me sick (until it did, and I had a multi-day migraine). Eating food that had been grilled on the same surface as bread should have been fine (I got a 3-day migraine with dry heaving from that one). I'm lactose intolerant (like the majority of adult humans), which becomes worse when I've been recently glutened, but I can easily tell the difference between lactose and gluten problems. The former doesn't result in migraines, sores/breakouts or multi-day bloating and digestive problems.

Point is: we're not OCD (well, I'm not at least, and I doubt the majority here are). We're doing what is necessary to keep ourselves safe. I don't shy away from doorknobs, but if I know that people have been eating sandwiches and then touching the same doorknob, you'd better believe I'm washing my hands before I touch anything that goes near my mouth.
  • 2

#18 TwitchyMcLurcherson

 
TwitchyMcLurcherson

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 12 posts
 

Posted 18 October 2010 - 01:22 PM

Some of us simply ARE more sensitive.

For me, it's completely neurological. 30 minutes after getting glutened, I have what amounts to a seizure- and this seizure can continue for hours. If I don't get to my anti-convulsants in those first 30 minutes, it's not going to work. Last night it happened in public and I fell down outside of a cafe. No one helped.

ANY level of gluten, whatsoever, sets me off. Count your lucky stars that you don't have to worry about it like that. Some of us are paranoid because we HAVE to be.
  • 1

#19 rdunbar

 
rdunbar

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 225 posts
 

Posted 18 October 2010 - 02:33 PM

Some of us simply ARE more sensitive.

For me, it's completely neurological. 30 minutes after getting glutened, I have what amounts to a seizure- and this seizure can continue for hours. If I don't get to my anti-convulsants in those first 30 minutes, it's not going to work. Last night it happened in public and I fell down outside of a cafe. No one helped.

ANY level of gluten, whatsoever, sets me off. Count your lucky stars that you don't have to worry about it like that. Some of us are paranoid because we HAVE to be.

I'm so sorry to hear about that. OMG. I know how helpless you feel when that happens in public. Something similar happens to me, I get all shaky, and can't control my arms , it's really scary. I've been glutened and literally doubled over in pain everywhere, and unable to keep my balance, or really walk right.
It used to happen to me in the past, at times when I was really stressed, or something triggered it.
I was always inclined to put it ouy of my mind, or to explain it away, I geuss it's all a form of denial; but deep down I always knew I had some serious problem
I'm just so thankful that I think I've figured it out about gluten anyways, and to better cope with avoiding it
there are things that come along with being gluten free that are very positive and advantageous; I actually like how the nessisary discipline is great practice for improving all aspects of life, and other interests you might have. But then again I was always a perfectionist
I'm super sensitive too , and am just getting really used to being very strict, so know how big a difference it makes as I've been healing and feeling better. And have managed to be glutened a few times ;
it makes me feel more comfortable about being having to be really careful all the time, and knowing I'm not the only one,
  • 0

#20 K8ling

 
K8ling

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 540 posts
 

Posted 18 October 2010 - 03:04 PM

I have actual OCD and am on anti anxiety medication. To call it OCD is a bad idea. I take medication to control my OCD.

My concern over being glutened is more being aware than obsessed. If in doubt, I just don't eat it. my concern never makes me anxious. My OCD does.
  • 0
Diagnosed with Gluten Allergy April 2010. Family history of Celiac disease and bowel cancers. Already feeling a billion times better since going gluten free.

#21 MelindaLee

 
MelindaLee

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 375 posts
 

Posted 18 October 2010 - 05:38 PM

I understand where your concern/opinion comes from. I have been lucky and truly found my celiac before I was terribly sick, and I haven't had many issues since. But, it also seems reasonable to me that someone who has been sick for a long time...with lots of damage to their system will be very concerned and sensitive to small amounts of gluten. I did not do like many have and change all of my pots and pan (though they were relatively new and not scratched at all) I found out quickly that I couldn't share a toaster, though. I was fortunate and didn't have an extreme reaction, but I could tell I wasn't feeling as good. (And, of course, I had to test it more than once because I am so stubborn! :D )Had I been really sick, espeically for any length of time, I think I would feel the same way as many of the other posters here. You will figure out what works for you. I have been out to eat many times in the couple of months that I have been gluten-free with no issues, but I am logical about my choices (and often choose restaurants with gluten-free menu). I will eat at other's homes, but I usually offer to help cook and so I know what was prepared where, and how, and if I trust it. I don't let this define who I am, but more what I want to put in my body. No different if I was a "picky" eater (which I could never be confused with! :lol: ) Don't forget if you choose not to go gluten-free the consequence could be extreme. The risks of cancer are more than I am willing to gamble with. :blink:
  • 0

#22 BethJ

 
BethJ

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 162 posts
 

Posted 19 October 2010 - 09:42 AM

I can definately tell the difference between gluten and other random ailments because my glutenings follow a pattern. First almost immediately I'll get the big D. Then within a few hours fatigue. The next day achy joints and a rash. Then a day or two later I'll typically get a canker sore.


You just described my reaction and how I can tell if it's from gluten or from something else (I seem to be sensitive to fructose and dairy at times). I know it's gluten because the D will hit within 30 minutes and I immediately feel like I've been run over by a truck. The fatigue is almost overwhelming and lasts from 24 to 36 hours. The next day I ache, can't think straight and want to sleep all day. I tell people it's like having the flu. Sometimes the rash shows up immediately and sometimes it hits several days later. Same with the canker sores.

Maybe I am a little OCD about gluten but if I am, it's because I don't want to be sick. My stepdaughter tells me how wonderful it is to have such will-power but I tell her it has nothing to do with will-power. I just don't want to feel like crap for days.
  • 0
Beth in Florida

Gluten-free since 7/19/08
Alcohol free since 6/28/10




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: