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What's The Deal With Post's Fruity Pebbles Cereal?


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25 replies to this topic

#1 JennyW

 
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Posted 20 October 2010 - 07:56 AM

My almost 2 year old daughter was just recently diagnosed with Celiac (confirmed via blood test/endoscopy) and I am trying out different kid friendly snack food for her. I read the ingredients on Post's Fruity Pebbles Cereal and saw that there were no gluten containing ingredients and bought some. Then I got home and decided to call the manufacturer just in case and asked if the cereal was gluten free. They told me that the Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles, and Cupcake pebbles are all made on DESIGNATED gluten free lines, but that they are in a facility that processes other cereals. Has anyone had a problem with this cereal? It seems to me that being on designated lines would mean they would be considered gluten free? Also, does anyone know what the regulations are on printing whether a product is made in a facility that processes wheat are? Based on what I've seen on other processed items, it seems to be hit and miss. They direct you to their ingredient list, but if they're putting that food on a flour coated line, it seems like they'd have to tell you about it! I know the FDA requires that they clearly notate whether the product specifically contains one of the top 8 allergens, but I can't find any information regarding whether or not they have to print that the facility processes one of the top 8 allergens. Thanks for any info. This forum has been an incredible resource for me and my family as we adjust to our daughter's gluten free diet. I can't believe how quickly she responded to the diet change and what a different person she is now...it's incredible that all we needed to do was change the food we were giving her---just wish we had known earlier before going through months of throwing up, diarrhea, Emergency Room trips, etc.
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#2 Kim27

 
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Posted 20 October 2010 - 08:31 AM

I eat the Fruity Pebbles a few times a week and I've never had a problem. As far as I know the laws don't regulate "made in facility". There are some companies that willing put that on there, but they aren't required to. That's my understanding. That said, if it's a designated gluten-free line within that same facility , I think it's unlikely to give someone a problem. It's not coming in contact with anything.
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#3 scarlett77

 
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Posted 20 October 2010 - 09:45 AM

We have also not had any issues with Fruity Pebbles. My general rule is made in the same facility is OK, made on the same equipment is NOT OK.
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Mommy to James, who is Celiac diagnosis by blood test and confirmed by endoscopy on 9/29/2009. Our household has been gluten free since.

#4 twohokies

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 08:47 AM

Do you have a Wegmans in your area? They make a fruity pebbles that they advertise as gluten-free, which I think means that they aren't made in the same facility. That is an option.
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#5 JennyW

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 09:21 AM

I live on the west coast, so do not have a Wegmans, but maybe I will be on the lookout in other stores! Thanks for the suggestion :)

Do you have a Wegmans in your area? They make a fruity pebbles that they advertise as gluten-free, which I think means that they aren't made in the same facility. That is an option.


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#6 lovegrov

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 11:26 AM

Not required to print anything what's made in the facility. I wouldn't worry about eating the Pebbles.

richard
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#7 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 23 October 2010 - 08:03 PM

The statistics for gluten-free food made in facilities where wheat is also processed is 30% likelihood of being contaminated and 70% if the equipment itself is used to process both gluten-free and wheat products. That said, I eat either Cocoa Pebbles or Fruity Pebbles on a regular basis (have for the past seven years since being diagnosed with celiac), and I've NEVER had a problem with their cereals.
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#8 T.H.

 
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Posted 23 October 2010 - 10:04 PM

I'd be leery of it, honestly, especially with your daughter so small yet that she can't really tell you if she's not feeling well.

My daughter was 11 when she was diagnosed. We started her on gluten-free foods and she improved, but it wasn't until the last few months (she's 12 now) that we were able to tell that some of the gluten-free food still had more gluten than she could handle. Most of it here in the States is 20ppm or less, and now that we've figured out some things, we're realizing that she's reacting to foods between 10ppm and 20ppm. :o She has now had reactions to pretty much all the cereals we've tried, including ones that are labeled 'gluten free,' like the envirokids ones.

But some of her gluten symptoms that have developed (or we've figured out) over the last year are things like her arms and legs feeling shaky and weak, crying jags, exhaustion and difficulty waking, depression - things that were difficult to figure out even when we had a child that could talk to us about it, ya know? Many times, we've had to cut out most processed foods when she starts reacting just so we can figure out what she's been reacting to. I think that would be a much more challenging process with a little bitty who can't really express clearly all her symptoms.

Another factor to consider, if you do try the fruity pebbles, is amounts. I only mention this because I know with my kids, if they had a snack they liked, they could just eat it all the time, especially when we were on trips and that sort of thing. But gluten-free food reminds me of low calorie food - it's low calorie, but eat enough of it and it'll still be a lot of calories. Since our gluten free food is actually 'really low gluten' rather than 'no gluten,' if your midget has a day when she eats a lot of fruity pebbles, she can still have issues with it.
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T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#9 modiddly16

 
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Posted 24 October 2010 - 03:11 PM

I too have eaten both of the pebbles for close to 7 years without ever having an issue. I'm not sure I've heard of anyone being sick from it either, on this board, but sometimes threads get a little too long for my attention span. Your daughter is young and maybe the cereal is a bit more sugar than she's accustomed to?
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#10 nmlove

 
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Posted 27 October 2010 - 04:12 AM

I'd be leery of it, honestly, especially with your daughter so small yet that she can't really tell you if she's not feeling well.

She has now had reactions to pretty much all the cereals we've tried, including ones that are labeled 'gluten free,' like the envirokids ones.

Another factor to consider, if you do try the fruity pebbles, is amounts. I only mention this because I know with my kids, if they had a snack they liked, they could just eat it all the time, especially when we were on trips and that sort of thing. But gluten-free food reminds me of low calorie food - it's low calorie, but eat enough of it and it'll still be a lot of calories. Since our gluten free food is actually 'really low gluten' rather than 'no gluten,' if your midget has a day when she eats a lot of fruity pebbles, she can still have issues with it.


Interesting. My two sons are young (3 and 5). They were doing great the first 6 months on the diet and now we're struggling to see why their symptoms are returning when nothing new has been added. They never tell me if they're hurting (they never did pre-diagnosis either) so I can only go off bathroom antics and behavior problems. I did take away their rice milk and while it seems to have helped, they still seem not quite right. Very frustrating! So, what do you do for breakfast? My 5 year old is a cereal junkie. I limit him to one bowl a day because it's so darn expensive.
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#11 JennyW

 
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Posted 27 October 2010 - 06:23 AM

Personally, my little one does scrambled eggs for breakfast with some cheese and fruit. But, if cereal is the thing to have, I just recently found that the General Mills Chex cereals have 5 flavors that are now gluten free (Rice Chex, Corn Chex, Honey Nut Chex, Chocolate Chex, and Cinnamon Chex). Unlike the specialty boxed cereals (Envirokids for example), the Chex ones seemed more regularly priced, so it might be an option for you :)

Interesting. My two sons are young (3 and 5). They were doing great the first 6 months on the diet and now we're struggling to see why their symptoms are returning when nothing new has been added. They never tell me if they're hurting (they never did pre-diagnosis either) so I can only go off bathroom antics and behavior problems. I did take away their rice milk and while it seems to have helped, they still seem not quite right. Very frustrating! So, what do you do for breakfast? My 5 year old is a cereal junkie. I limit him to one bowl a day because it's so darn expensive.


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#12 missy'smom

 
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Posted 27 October 2010 - 08:13 AM

So, what do you do for breakfast?


My kiddo likes chicken and rice soup in the cooler weather. Other breakfast staples for him are cheese cubes, ham, bacon, gluten-free toast or open face ham and cheese melt on gluten-free bread, hash browns-can be made the night before and warmed up-Ore Ida makes some that are gluten-free, fruit, yogurt, homemade gluten-free pancakes(made ahead in a batch, frozen and warmed up), apples and nut butter of some sort...
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#13 twohokies

 
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Posted 27 October 2010 - 08:23 AM

Interesting. My two sons are young (3 and 5). They were doing great the first 6 months on the diet and now we're struggling to see why their symptoms are returning when nothing new has been added. They never tell me if they're hurting (they never did pre-diagnosis either) so I can only go off bathroom antics and behavior problems. I did take away their rice milk and while it seems to have helped, they still seem not quite right. Very frustrating! So, what do you do for breakfast? My 5 year old is a cereal junkie. I limit him to one bowl a day because it's so darn expensive.


When my 3yo was diagnosed, my husband ran out and bought all the super expensive organic gluten-free cereals. *I* buy her chex and kix and of course the Wegmans fruity pebbles. There are a few other options I've noticed on the regular cereal shelf, but since I haven't purchased them yet I can't recall. Chex does also make chocolate chex which is a GREAT snack!
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#14 nmlove

 
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Posted 27 October 2010 - 09:54 AM

Thanks for the breakfast ideas. I didn't mean to highjack the thread. ;) I do make eggs, pancakes, etc but that's like 2nd breakfast to them. I have little hobbits in the making I guess with the amount of food they can put away (who knew a 3 and 5 year old could eat so much?!). They do like eating my version of muesli - gluten free oats with cut up apple and nuts with milk to wet. And cooked oatmeal too. Maybe I'm the one in the food rut! I will try less expensive cereals and see if they help the budget. I'm really trying to get away from anything "special" to cut down on costs. Now I just need to find a good snacking bar that's easy to make and not too sugary but the kids still want to eat!
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#15 buffettbride

 
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Posted 27 October 2010 - 01:19 PM

My super-sensitive Celiac eats Fruity and/or Cocoa Pebbles with no problems, ever. Probably have about 1 box per month.
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