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Can A Child "outgrow" Celiac?


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#1 Lori2

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 01:49 PM

Can a child “outgrow” celiac? My son, as an infant, after two hospitalizations for dehydration from diarrhea, was diagnosed as having celiac disease. He lived on soy formula, bananas, rice cereal and lamb for the first two years of his life. Somewhere around the age of 2˝ he “outgrew” his problem and has been eating a normal diet since. Dr. Peter Green in his book says that a person does not outgrow celiac, but is just a silent celiac and problems will surface later in life. I wonder how strongly I should urge him to have the celiac panel done. Now in his 50’s, he is in good health with no major problems.
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#2 shopgirl

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 01:59 PM

No. It's as simple as that. Like you said, people can have silent, latent, or asymptomatic Celiacs — or just subtle symptoms they might not attribute to Celiacs — but it can't be outgrown.
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#3 kareng

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 02:03 PM

Can a child “outgrow” celiac? My son, as an infant, after two hospitalizations for dehydration from diarrhea, was diagnosed as having celiac disease. He lived on soy formula, bananas, rice cereal and lamb for the first two years of his life. Somewhere around the age of 2˝ he “outgrew” his problem and has been eating a normal diet since. Dr. Peter Green in his book says that a person does not outgrow celiac, but is just a silent celiac and problems will surface later in life. I wonder how strongly I should urge him to have the celiac panel done. Now in his 50’s, he is in good health with no major problems.



I don't know how people were dxed 50 years ago or how accurate it was. I know my cousin was diagnosed as wheat allergy as a small kid and out grew it and in 50 years hasn't had any problems. I know a woman who was dxed about 50 years ago as Celiac but doesn't eat that way now. She has been examined by a GI several times and doesn't appear to have celiac disease. I wonder if they really had it to begin with.

It wouldn't hurt to have the blood work. When he has his routine colonscopy, for after age 50, maybe they could do an endoscopy with biopsies.
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#4 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 02:04 PM

You should encourage him to at least get the blood test done. There may actually be health issues you are not aware of as not all are comfortable discussing health issues with others. Also some people think the stomach issues that often come with celiac are 'normal for them'. Celiac can impact any organ so it isn't just tummy issues that are seen. Headaches, moodiness, joint and muscle pain, and much more can be part of the celiac picture. I should mention that since he was diagnosed as a young child you and all his first degree relatives should be screened also.
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"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#5 cassP

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 06:43 PM

ALL EXCELLENT points above AND TRUE!!!

one does NOT outgrow Celiac, period. & YES, even if it is not affecting his gut, it can be destroying another part of his body, like his brain or heart, etc, etc

and maybe it's possible that he was misdiagnosed 50 years ago...
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no biopsy (insurance denied)
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#6 T.H.

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 07:45 PM

One can't outgrow celiac disease, no.

I would guess the test was accurate considering that your son improved on a celiac diet. And there is definitely a chance of some severe problems at this point.

My father had no gut symptoms, but his hips deteriorated, his spine developed arthritis, his lungs had problems, etc...

It also increases his chances of having more serious complications to diseases and illnesses because he'll be immuno-compromised.

This is a website with 300 symptoms/signs of celiac disease that might help you and your son look at his health and decide if he should get tested again, or simply readopt the gluten free diet.



Can a child “outgrow” celiac? My son, as an infant, after two hospitalizations for dehydration from diarrhea, was diagnosed as having celiac disease. He lived on soy formula, bananas, rice cereal and lamb for the first two years of his life. Somewhere around the age of 2˝ he “outgrew” his problem and has been eating a normal diet since. Dr. Peter Green in his book says that a person does not outgrow celiac, but is just a silent celiac and problems will surface later in life. I wonder how strongly I should urge him to have the celiac panel done. Now in his 50’s, he is in good health with no major problems.


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Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#7 Skylark

 
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Posted 21 October 2010 - 08:13 PM

Yes, celiac disease CAN be outgrown. People around here think of celiac as permanent but it's not always the case. I'm a little frustrated because I can't seem to turn up the research article I read recently showing remission in some childhood celiacs.

Thing is, celiac remission is relatively rare, while "silent" celiac is more common. "Silent celiac" is where a person has no symptoms, but does have musocal damage and malabsorption. Osteoporosis is common, as are deficiencies in B vitamins that can lead to neurological disorders. If I were you, I would press him to get the testing done, because the consequences of silent celiac can be so severe.
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#8 Dixiebell

 
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Posted 22 October 2010 - 04:42 AM

Renission refers to the response of the treatment. It does not mean that the disease/condition is cured.
I believe this to be true because unfortunately, as in the case of my MIL, she is being treated for the third time for cancer. Her first was in the 80's, then early 2000, and now. The cancer is being found in the same area and has now moved to her bone. In between these times she was being tested to make sure she was in remission and she was. Yes,I know cancer is different from celiac.
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Started on this journey w/ my 9 yr old son after a bout w/ the flu in the fall of 2009.
2 neg celiac blood tests, mine was also neg. No endo done. Son had x-ray, showing severe constipation. Son has latex allergy. KP for both of us.
Long family history of bowel problems, auto-immune and all sorts of cancers. My G-mother informed me that she was put on a gluten free diet after she had my mom (1950's), of course she stopped when she felt better. She has had problems ever since I can remember.
So here we are! I do have my son's Dr to thank for even bringing up celiac! Thank You Dr.B!
My adult daughter also has been helped by eating gluten-free.

#9 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 22 October 2010 - 05:33 AM

Yes, celiac disease CAN be outgrown. People around here think of celiac as permanent but it's not always the case. I'm a little frustrated because I can't seem to turn up the research article I read recently showing remission in some childhood celiacs.

Thing is, celiac remission is relatively rare, while "silent" celiac is more common. "Silent celiac" is where a person has no symptoms, but does have musocal damage and malabsorption. Osteoporosis is common, as are deficiencies in B vitamins that can lead to neurological disorders. If I were you, I would press him to get the testing done, because the consequences of silent celiac can be so severe.


While remission can occur, doctors refer to it as a 'honeymoon' period, damage is still being done. This remission was the reason why doctors years ago commonly thought that celiac was a childhood disease and that children could outgrow it. It can take a long time for symptoms to reoccur and they are not always the GI symptoms that are usually thought of but can be damage to others organs.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#10 Mari

 
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Posted 22 October 2010 - 10:19 AM

Back 50 years ago gluten sensitivity was usually diagnosed by eliminating wheat, barley and rye from the diet and noticing the improvement. Your son may have had a wheat allergy and this may have cleared up as he got older. He may have had non-celiac sprue (Leaky Gut Syndrome) which cleared up on the gluten free diet, especially if he was gluten-free at 5 months when the intestinal wall matures and prevents food antigens from entering the body. If he had autoimmune Celiac Disease it may have become silent but there may have been some continuing damage to his small intestine even tho he had no symptoms.

I suggest having him tested by the genetic DNA tests which would tell if he is predisposed to developing Celiac Disease and Leaky Gut Syndrome. Also the Molecular Serology test (Prometheus Labs) could give the same information. There are several labs online which can do the DNA tests, I used Enterolab.com. The serology test is ordered by Drs.
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#11 Lori2

 
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Posted 23 October 2010 - 09:11 AM

Back 50 years ago gluten sensitivity was usually diagnosed by eliminating wheat, barley and rye from the diet and noticing the improvement. Your son may have had a wheat allergy and this may have cleared up as he got older. He may have had non-celiac sprue (Leaky Gut Syndrome) which cleared up on the gluten free diet, especially if he was gluten-free at 5 months when the intestinal wall matures and prevents food antigens from entering the body. If he had autoimmune Celiac Disease it may have become silent but there may have been some continuing damage to his small intestine even tho he had no symptoms.


Probably not a wheat allergy. He was hospitalized the first time for dehydration at one month of age. I had tried nursing him but didn't have enough milk, so he was on whatever formula we used back then. I have no idea what was in it.

At six months he was anemic so the Dr. gave me a liquid iron supplement to try. One-fourth of a teaspoonful was enough to give him diarrhea. Again, I don't know what was in it. Back then you didn't ask questions of your Dr. and you didn't get copies of lab work. You just followed orders.

Last night I gave him copies of a few pages from Dr. Green's book to read. Since he is very health conscious, he will probably go to his Dr. for a celiac panel. At least I hope so.
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#12 aircooled

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 11:45 AM

Can a child “outgrow” celiac? My son, as an infant, after two hospitalizations for dehydration from diarrhea, was diagnosed as having celiac disease. He lived on soy formula, bananas, rice cereal and lamb for the first two years of his life. Somewhere around the age of 2˝ he “outgrew” his problem and has been eating a normal diet since. Dr. Peter Green in his book says that a person does not outgrow celiac, but is just a silent celiac and problems will surface later in life. I wonder how strongly I should urge him to have the celiac panel done. Now in his 50’s, he is in good health with no major problems.

I has celiac as a small child and after living on bananas and three other foods (I can't remember) for 18 months I had healed and apparently went into remission. I lived my entire life eating gluten with no apparent ill effects and in generally excellent health. I have for many years followed a vegetarian diet with modest amounts of fish in the last few years. I avoided sugars and ate a very healthy diet. For a number of years I even owned a health food store. I am now 56 and recently suffered a number of very stressful events. Then very recently I came down with what felt like flu. No sooner than I "recovered" than I began to experienced symptoms of severe IBS. My father reminded me that I was a celiac baby. Removing gluten from my diet had an immediate positive effect on both my GI tract as well as mental alertness, energy and even seemed to help with cramping that had developed in my right hand n the past year.
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#13 sandsurfgirl

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 01:57 PM

Yes, celiac disease CAN be outgrown. People around here think of celiac as permanent but it's not always the case. I'm a little frustrated because I can't seem to turn up the research article I read recently showing remission in some childhood celiacs.

Thing is, celiac remission is relatively rare, while "silent" celiac is more common. "Silent celiac" is where a person has no symptoms, but does have musocal damage and malabsorption. Osteoporosis is common, as are deficiencies in B vitamins that can lead to neurological disorders. If I were you, I would press him to get the testing done, because the consequences of silent celiac can be so severe.



If you're in remission you haven't outgrown it. It's just lurking in the shadows and you don't know when it will come back. We patients report so many non GI issues that cleared up with gluten free diet, so it's likely that the "remission" is just for GI symptoms and the person can be presenting with other things the docs aren't linking to celiac.


Allergy is a whole different game. Allergy is a histamine response. With allergy shots you can condition your body not to react to an allergen and yes allergies can be outgrown. Celiac is autoimmune and you cannot outgrow it even if it does go in remission.

I had it my whole life and got diagnosed at 40. There were times I felt good though and I believe it was in remission. But it always reared its ugly head again.

As for the OP's son, I would like to know his entire health picture. Does he stumble or bump into things? Does he have asthma, allergies or sinus infections? Anxiety? Joint pain? There are so many non GI symptoms of celiac.
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Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.
Ready to get well and get on with my life!

#14 Lori2

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 02:22 PM

I see that it has been a year since I started this thread. In June my son did EnteroLab testing which showed him to gluten and casein sensitive. With his personality type, I think he will be able to maintain a gluten-free diet even though he doesn’t have major symptoms.

He seems to be in good health with the exception of several sport related injuries—a bad hip from running marathons. Currently he does long distance cycling. He is very much aware of how any food or supplement effects his body—strength, fatigue, recovery, etc. The only difference he is aware of by going gluten free is in sinus drainage—post nasal drip.
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#15 sandsurfgirl

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 04:21 PM

Ha ha I never looked at the original date! Glad he's doing better and has answers.
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Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.
Ready to get well and get on with my life!




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