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Kneading


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#1 The Glutenator

 
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Posted 01 November 2010 - 05:43 AM

Quick question to all you excellent bakers: do you need to knead gluten-free dough that does not have yeast in it? I thought kneading either helped with the yeast or, in yeast free doughs, it activated the gluten. So if I am adapting a biscuit recipe (no yeast) and using gluten-free flour, can I omit the kneading step? Thank you!

PS Had several failed attempts to adapt an english muffin recipe because the dough wouldn't rise, so I am avoiding yeasty stuff for now, haha. Maybe one day!
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#2 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 01 November 2010 - 06:08 AM

You can't kneed gluten-free dough.
It always has the consistency of thick cake batter.

And it only takes 1 rise before you bake it.
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Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

#3 Kay DH

 
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Posted 01 November 2010 - 06:30 AM

gluten-free dough is usually too thin to knead; it is more soft mounds than cake-batter consistency for breads (at least at 1.6 km elevation). However, it is good to mix the dough completely so it is homogeneous. Just an observation, but the xanthan gum seems more elastic if the dough is mixed well. If using a breadmaker, I usually have a full "knead" and one rise with yeast breads. A second rise doesn't hurt unless you have really wimpy yeast. With cakes and yeast-free breads, there is no real risk of it being too elastic, so you don't need to limit the mixing like you would with gluten-based batter. :)
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#4 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 01 November 2010 - 07:09 AM

The previous posters are correct about most gluten free doughs not needing to be kneaded. I'm just curious what recipe you are trying to convert, because I actually never kneaded biscuits when I made them prior to gluten free. Usually the more you knead a biscuit dough the tougher the biscuit will be. I like my biscuits light and fluffy. I'm not sure if the same approach would work with a gluten free biscuit, however. I have yet to have success making gluten-free biscuits. So maybe they need to be kneaded? Do you care to share the recipe you were trying to make gluten-free? I would love to be able to make good gluten-free biscuits. Everyone here is great at helping with converting or suggesting alternative recipes.
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#5 The Glutenator

 
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Posted 01 November 2010 - 07:56 AM

Oh, these are delicious and I highly recommend them. I have made them with the kneading step and without, and didn't notice a difference between the two batches (hence this topic post ;) ) In place of the flour I use Carol's Sorghum blend (1 1/2 c sorghum flour, 1 1/2 c corn starch, 1 c tapioca flour) and then add about 1/2 tsp xanthum gum to the recipe. I also usually form it into 8 individual biscuits/scones as well. They are superb, especially with honey!

Ingredients
1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup yellow cornmeal
3 tablespoons sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 1/2 tablespoons chilled butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 cup 1% low-fat milk
1 large egg, lightly beaten
Cooking spray
Preparation
Preheat oven to 375.

Lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl; cut in butter with a pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add milk and egg to cornmeal mixture; stir just until moist.

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead lightly 4 times with floured hands. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper; coat with cooking spray. Pat dough into a 7-inch circle on prepared baking sheet. Cut dough into 8 wedges, cutting into but not through dough.

Bake at 375 for 22 minutes or until golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Serve warm.

And thanks for your help!

If you have any suggestions for this, let me know:

English muffins

Original Recipe Yield 18 muffins (approximately)
Ingredients

1 cup milk
2 tablespoons white sugar
1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast
1 cup warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
1/4 cup melted shortening
6 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
Directions

Warm the milk in a small saucepan until it bubbles, then remove from heat. Mix in the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Let cool until lukewarm. In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. Let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes.
In a large bowl, combine the milk, yeast mixture, shortening and 3 cups flour. Beat until smooth. Add salt and rest of flour, or enough to make a soft dough. Knead. Place in greased bowl, cover, and let rise.
Punch down. Roll out to about 1/2 inch thick. Cut rounds with biscuit cutter, drinking glass, or empty tuna can. Sprinkle waxed paper with cornmeal and set the rounds on this to rise. Dust tops of muffins with cornmeal also. Cover and let rise 1/2 hour.
Heat greased griddle. Cook muffins on griddle about 10 minutes on each side on medium heat. Keep baked muffins in a warm oven until all have been cooked. Allow to cool and place in plastic bags for storage. To use, split and toast. Great with orange butter, or cream cheese and jam.
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#6 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 01 November 2010 - 08:12 AM

Thank you for the biscuit recipe. They sound wonderful, I have never seen biscuits with eggs in them, but I bet that helps hold it together. :)
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