Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

How About Bread Crumbs?


  • Please log in to reply

13 replies to this topic

#1 TPT

 
TPT

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 77 posts
 

Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:09 PM

What do you use for bread crumbs?

Thank you
  • 1

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 kareng

 
kareng

    HO! HO! HO!

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,317 posts
 

Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:26 PM

I made some gluten-free Pantry bread. Chopped a loaf up and blenderized it. Then I froze them. Then I sauted some in butter and put on top of my Swiss cheese green beans. Yum!
  • 1

santa-dance.gif

 

Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice. - Dave Barry
 
“The main reason Santa is so jolly is because he knows where all the bad girls live.”  - George Carlin
 
“One can never have enough socks," said Dumbledore. "Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn't get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.”  - J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone
 
 
 
 
 

 


#3 lpellegr

 
lpellegr

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 779 posts
 

Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:27 PM

I make bread just so I can make it into crumbs, but there are less labor-intensive substitutes. For breading meat or fish, you can use crushed Rice Chex, or potato chips, or something else that bakes up crunchy. One of my cookbooks recommends making corn bread or muffins and crumbling those as toppings. As a filler for meat loaf or meatballs, you can substitute cooked rice, grated vegetables, or gluten free oatmeal if you can tolerate that. To make crumbs from bread, cut or tear slices into cubes or small pieces, spread out on a tray to dry somewhat, then put into a 250 degree oven and stir every 30 minutes until they are evenly dry and slightly brown. If they are dry enough, you can use a food processor or blender to make crumbs and store them at room temperature. If you're not sure they are dry enough (you don't want mold), you can store them in the freezer.
  • 1
Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

#4 Mama Melissa

 
Mama Melissa

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 170 posts
 

Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:39 PM

If you need premade breadcrumbs i hear Gillians are pretty good im going to try them myself:) I have tried Glutino breadcrumbs there ok:) Goodluck!
  • 1
Melissa
9/10 Diagnosed celiac via bloodwork/endo
9/10 Gluten free

#5 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 26 November 2010 - 05:10 PM

I just take any bread that is getting a bit old and make it into croutons and crumbs.
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#6 psawyer

 
psawyer

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,070 posts
 

Posted 26 November 2010 - 06:34 PM

I just take any bread that is getting a bit old and make it into croutons and crumbs.

What Neroli said.

We bake Gluten Free Pantry French bread, and save the heels from each loaf. They get cut up into croutons, or ground into bread crumbs in the blender. We keep the bread in the refrigerator and then freeze the heels until needed.
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#7 wildwood

 
wildwood

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 139 posts
 

Posted 26 November 2010 - 08:02 PM

I like the Schar bread crumbs the best. They are pricey, but the little bag does go a long way. I also use Rice Chex ground up on their own or if I need to stretch the Schar crumbs, I combine the Rice Chex crumbs and Schar crumbs. If I have any bread failures, I grind those up into bread crumbs and put them in the freezer until I am ready to use them. These I tend to use in meatloaf or meatballs because the consistency varies so much and using them this way is less noticeable.
  • 0

#8 TPT

 
TPT

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 77 posts
 

Posted 27 November 2010 - 04:47 AM

I make bread just so I can make it into crumbs, but there are less labor-intensive substitutes. For breading meat or fish, you can use crushed Rice Chex, or potato chips, or something else that bakes up crunchy. One of my cookbooks recommends making corn bread or muffins and crumbling those as toppings. As a filler for meat loaf or meatballs, you can substitute cooked rice, grated vegetables, or gluten free oatmeal if you can tolerate that. To make crumbs from bread, cut or tear slices into cubes or small pieces, spread out on a tray to dry somewhat, then put into a 250 degree oven and stir every 30 minutes until they are evenly dry and slightly brown. If they are dry enough, you can use a food processor or blender to make crumbs and store them at room temperature. If you're not sure they are dry enough (you don't want mold), you can store them in the freezer.



This might be a stupid question, but when you make bread crumbs from bread yourself as you describe, does it keep longer than the loaf of bread itself? I remember my mother-in-law keeping a bag a fresh bread crumbs she got from a deli. I was appalled when she told me she kept it for months. Do baked/dried out crumbs keep longer? I always figured regular bread crumbs had some preservatives in them.
  • 0

#9 Nor_TX

 
Nor_TX

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 298 posts
 

Posted 27 November 2010 - 07:44 PM

I keept the heels from my Udi and Rudi and Katz breads in the freezer. When I need breadcrumbs, I take them out, thaw them and whirl them in the food processor. I also cut them into pieces, drizzle some melted dairy free margarine and season them and cook them on high in the microwave stirring often until they are crispy. I use the croutons for topping soups.
  • 0
Gluten Intolerance, Colitis, IBS, Lactose and Casein Intolerance, Gastro-Paresis, GERD, Arthritis. Taking Remicade and Asacol, 2 Prilosec/day among other meds. Officially a senior citizen! New knee is doing well.. now about that other knee...

Food is in my dreams and in my nightmares!

#10 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 27 November 2010 - 08:09 PM

Thought you might appreciate the sense of humour of this recipe author:

"1/2 c breadcrumbs (for breadcrumbs, buy some crappy gluten-free bread from the grocery store and toast it then pulse in the food processor until crumby)
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#11 lpellegr

 
lpellegr

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 779 posts
 

Posted 28 November 2010 - 05:00 AM

This might be a stupid question, but when you make bread crumbs from bread yourself as you describe, does it keep longer than the loaf of bread itself? I remember my mother-in-law keeping a bag a fresh bread crumbs she got from a deli. I was appalled when she told me she kept it for months. Do baked/dried out crumbs keep longer? I always figured regular bread crumbs had some preservatives in them.


When you buy "normal" bread crumbs they are at room temp and seem to keep forever. The trick is to make sure they are dried out. Mold and bacteria need moisture to grow, so if your crumbs are thoroughly dry you can keep them on the shelf. I used to keep them in the freezer, but I started leaving the crumbs (or the dried cubes I was too lazy to pulverize) on the shelf and they have been just fine. If you have doubts, just keep them in the freezer.
  • 0
Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

#12 TPT

 
TPT

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 77 posts
 

Posted 28 November 2010 - 03:24 PM

When you buy "normal" bread crumbs they are at room temp and seem to keep forever. The trick is to make sure they are dried out. Mold and bacteria need moisture to grow, so if your crumbs are thoroughly dry you can keep them on the shelf. I used to keep them in the freezer, but I started leaving the crumbs (or the dried cubes I was too lazy to pulverize) on the shelf and they have been just fine. If you have doubts, just keep them in the freezer.



Thanks Lee. The mositure thing makes sense.
  • 0

#13 TPT

 
TPT

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 77 posts
 

Posted 28 November 2010 - 03:26 PM

When you buy "normal" bread crumbs they are at room temp and seem to keep forever. The trick is to make sure they are dried out. Mold and bacteria need moisture to grow, so if your crumbs are thoroughly dry you can keep them on the shelf. I used to keep them in the freezer, but I started leaving the crumbs (or the dried cubes I was too lazy to pulverize) on the shelf and they have been just fine. If you have doubts, just keep them in the freezer.



Thanks Lee. The mositure thing makes sense.
  • 0

#14 Tina B

 
Tina B

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 248 posts
 

Posted 28 November 2010 - 05:31 PM

What do you use for bread crumbs?

Thank you


Aleia's gluten free bread crumbs. They come plain or italian. They are great for chicken parm and brown nicely. Our regular grocery stores carry them here.
http://www.aleias.com/
  • 0
Gluten free since 1990.
Diagnosed by duodenal biopsy.

You don't stop skiing because you get old. You get old because you stop skiing :-)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: