Jump to content





   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Still Nauseas, But Finally Making A Connection...


  • Please log in to reply

Poll: Problems.. (18 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you have a problem eating Meat or Eggs?

  1. No (7 votes [38.89%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 38.89%

  2. Yes (9 votes [50.00%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

  3. I'm Not Sure... (1 votes [5.56%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.56%

  4. Not that I know of, but it is a good theory to test on myself... (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. You expect me to give up meat and eggs to feel better? Pshh. I already gave up gluten. Weird people. :P (1 votes [5.56%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.56%

Vote Guests cannot vote

10 replies to this topic

#1 Becci

 
Becci

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 162 posts
 

Posted 02 December 2010 - 10:25 AM

I have noticed a routine in my nausea... Since I went gluten-free in May '09, I was fine...
I had a problem with dairy for a while, but it eased up.

I started getting nauseated again about 3-4 months ago (roughly) and haven't been able to make a connection... I eat a TON of dairy, but went DF for a while, and it didn't get better.

Lately, I have noticed that when I eat meat, I get sicker than I was before.. Not just one type of meat (IE: Turkey), but all meats. But today, my theory got even more of a push when I ate an egg for lunch.. It made me sicker...
I realized that it would explain why even eating Nothing but veggies (with Ranch Dressing) I still felt sick...

Maybe I have a problem with a meat protein...

Good GOD, does this mean I have to become a vegetarian?? I am really gonna cry now. :o :'( :ph34r:
  • 0
[becci]

Celiac Disease
ABCDEFG, gummy bears are chasing me. One is red, one is blue, the yellow suckers got my shoe. ABCDEFG, gummy bears are chasing me.


Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 02 December 2010 - 10:30 AM

I have voted no to this question, but have to qualify my answer - I cannot eat beef that has been fed corn/hormones/antibiotics - only organic, grass-fed beef. No problems with any other meat, including meat that contains nitrates/nitrites, and no problems with eggs.
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#3 Becci

 
Becci

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 162 posts
 

Posted 02 December 2010 - 10:33 AM

I have voted no to this question, but have to qualify my answer - I cannot eat beef that has been fed corn/hormones/antibiotics - only organic, grass-fed beef. No problems with any other meat, including meat that contains nitrates/nitrites, and no problems with eggs.



Maybe I can try all organic meats.. It'll cost me an arm, a leg and probably my left nostril, but it is worth a shot!
  • 0
[becci]

Celiac Disease
ABCDEFG, gummy bears are chasing me. One is red, one is blue, the yellow suckers got my shoe. ABCDEFG, gummy bears are chasing me.


#4 burdee

 
burdee

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,400 posts
 

Posted 02 December 2010 - 11:48 AM

I can eat meat but not eggs. I have a diagnosed (IgG mediated) allergy to eggs. I used to have difficulty digesting meat. Then I read a book entitled "Why Stomach Acid is Good for You" by Jonathon Wright, MD and went to his clinic to get a Heidelberg capsule test for stomach acid production. That test showed that I very slowly produced only a little stomach acid.

Without adequate stomach acid, we can't digest meats or fats very well and don't absorb vital vitamins and minerals, like calcium, magesium and B vitamins. Normal levels of stomach acid also kills food born bacteria, parasites and fungi (like candida). Age, autoimmune diseases (like celiac disease) and using acid blockers can all cause inadequate stomach acid production.

Since my diagnosis of hypochloridia I've taken HCl supplements before each meal and I can easily digest any meats or fats. I also stopped getting gastrointestinal (bacteria, parasites and candida) infections, after having 8 during the past 4 years. Best of all I no longer have bloating and flatulence and I feel more satisfied after each meal.

If you have ever used acid blocker drugs or you get indigestion after eating meats, try drinking a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar dissolved in a little water before a meal with meat. If that improves your digestion, you might have inadequate stomach acid production. HOWEVER, I suggest you see a doc who can give you a Heidelberg capsule test for stomach acid production, before you try HCl supplements. If you used those while you have H. Pylori, achloridia or any damage to your stomach lining, you can seriously damage your stomach by using HCl supplements.

Before I was diagnosed and prescribed HCl capsules, I discovered that drinking ginger tea with meat/fat containing meals also helped digestion.

SUE
  • 1

Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#5 gf_soph

 
gf_soph

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 281 posts
 

Posted 02 December 2010 - 05:03 PM

Like the poster above, I would say look into stomach acid.

I am a life-long vegatarian, I had a lot of continuing problems after going gluten-free so I went on an elimination diet. The dietician I saw wanted to make sure I wasn't reacting to dairy or soy, and I couldn't handle beans, so I agreed to eat meat for a while, specifically lamb and chicken. It made me sick to my stomach. Over time I found that I don't digest fats or proteins to well, even after I cut the meat out.

I tried a hcl and pepsin supplement recently. I had mixed success in that it did end up causing some minor d after a while, but the amazing thing is that I went from having absolutely no appetite for days at a time to a regular appetite. It was so suprising that I wasn't sure what the feeling was at first! It seemed to help my stomach to empty, where before food would just sit in there and feel heavy, give me reflux etc. I took the pills for about a week and then stopped, and I intend to restart at some point to see if it can kick start my appetite and protein digestion.

I wouldn't say that you have to go vegetarian necessarily, but it would be a good idea to keep a detailed food diary, and then simplify what you are eating. Maybe try cooking the meat very low fat in case that is part of the problem. Try eating one type of meat at a time for a few days, and see if there are any that you can digest better. I found out that I had a bad reaction to chicken and eggs, and the reactions ranged from immediate to 1-2 days later. Also try small portion sizes and see if that helps.
  • 0

#6 Pac

 
Pac

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 156 posts
 

Posted 03 December 2010 - 04:14 AM

I voted no but I too have problems with some meats depending on their origin. Cc might be part of the problem as things got better after I started washing eggs well before putting them in the fridge (chicken eat wheat and lay eggs in straw) and washing all meat before cooking (to avoid cc from breaded stuff). For the same reason I stopped buying minced meat.
For some reason chicken fat makes me sick. I can only eat chicken when grilled until all the fat drips into the fire. Other animal fats are ok, though.
  • 0

#7 tarni

 
tarni

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25 posts
 

Posted 03 December 2010 - 08:38 PM

I have been meat-and-egg free for seven years. This is because they seriously and directly upset my female hormones. This includes, surprisingly, the organic and free-range animal products. Thought I’d mention my experience, just in case you or your daughters are having a tricky time with puberty or anything reproductively related.

I get really ill, not only hormonally, after some meat or egg ‘sneaks’ into my food. People can be well-meaning, want to fatten one up etc. but my body reacts and I literally have to sweat it out for a week. Every bit of my body just rejects them.

Now that I finally know I have other intolerances, I take my own food and utensils everywhere, with big bowls of yummy safe salads to share, if it is a party.

I’m aware that a restricted diet (and intolerances/malabsorption) can result in vitamin etc deficiencies, so I am taking tests with a new doctor in January 2011. I think these tests are important for all of us, especially if we cut out meat etc.
  • 0
Nov 2010: Fructose Malabsorption - low FODMAP diet
Oct 2010: Lactose Intolerance
Sept 2010: Gluten Intolerance

Symptoms: gastrointestinal, neurological, psychological, hormonal

Father: Dermatomyositis (autoimmune disease)
Sister: Non-verbal Autism
Cousins: Gluten Intolerance, Crohns, Hiatus Hernia

#8 Skylark

 
Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts
 

Posted 03 December 2010 - 08:50 PM

You might look at some of the RPAH Failsafe diet info if you seem to be reacting to all meat and eggs. There can be a lot of amines in meat and eggs and some people react. The solution is to find a source of very fresh meat.

http://failsafediet....dairy-and-eggs/
  • 0

#9 tarni

 
tarni

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25 posts
 

Posted 06 December 2010 - 07:08 PM

Thanks Skylark, great link

Coincidentally, RPAH is in my ‘strategic plan’, which I’ve drawn-up, not only because I became overwhelmed with information (and needed 'baby-steps'), but also because I wanted to ascertain as ‘scientifically and medically as possible’ what my body does not tolerate, and what it needs. A baseline for my future life, really.

My last three months are in my signature below. And now: Dec is for getting food-safe at social/festive occasions. Jan is for blood tests. Feb is for seeing how vitamin etc supplements affect me. March for checking out RPAH.

Back on topic: I think estrogen is my problem with eggs and meat, even estrogen naturally occurring in free-range animal products. I’ve had a hormonal imbalance (progesterone v estrogen) since puberty, when the gastro problems began. I now think (just as a lay-person) the hormonal and intolerance issues are very much linked. I'll see how I go with RPAH next year. ta
  • 0
Nov 2010: Fructose Malabsorption - low FODMAP diet
Oct 2010: Lactose Intolerance
Sept 2010: Gluten Intolerance

Symptoms: gastrointestinal, neurological, psychological, hormonal

Father: Dermatomyositis (autoimmune disease)
Sister: Non-verbal Autism
Cousins: Gluten Intolerance, Crohns, Hiatus Hernia

#10 MTG

 
MTG

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
 

Posted 08 December 2010 - 08:24 AM

I have voted no to this question, but have to qualify my answer - I cannot eat beef that has been fed corn/hormones/antibiotics - only organic, grass-fed beef. No problems with any other meat, including meat that contains nitrates/nitrites, and no problems with eggs.


I voted yes but I have a similar qualifier. I get violently ill after eating beef, it feels a bit like getting glutened but more painful and without the neuro symptoms. Seems like I really have to try grass-fed beef.
  • 0

#11 T.H.

 
T.H.

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,816 posts
 

Posted 08 December 2010 - 11:05 AM

My meat issues are a combination of things, best we can tell:
1. antibiotic residue in meat that were given antibiotics. I have allergies to antibiotics, and since going gluten-free, I seem to react even more.
2. Gluten CC on poultry skin from the processing and on any meat that's been cut up at the supermarket butcher's. Some seafood is processed in facilities where it gets CC too. I've bought some big pieces of meat at the supermarket from the butcher that are still sealed from the slaughterhouse.


Some other things I've learned along the way, however?

1. I've met a number of sensitive celiacs who have problems with eggs from chickens who are fed gluten grains. Don't know why - seriously, no idea - but they seem to be okay with eggs from chickens that aren't fed this, if I remember correctly. So...who knows?

2. I've read stories from a couple people with corn issues who have a lot of problems with processed meat. Most meat in the States is typically washed with a mild bleach solution and since a few e. coli scares, they are often washed with citric acid, which is often derived from corn. I'm not sure what meat form other countries is washed with, but you might want to look into it?
  • 0

T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: