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Still Nauseas, But Finally Making A Connection...
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Problems..   18 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you have a problem eating Meat or Eggs?

    • No
    • Yes
    • I'm Not Sure...
    • Not that I know of, but it is a good theory to test on myself...
      0
    • You expect me to give up meat and eggs to feel better? Pshh. I already gave up gluten. Weird people. :P

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11 posts in this topic

I have noticed a routine in my nausea... Since I went gluten-free in May '09, I was fine...

I had a problem with dairy for a while, but it eased up.

I started getting nauseated again about 3-4 months ago (roughly) and haven't been able to make a connection... I eat a TON of dairy, but went DF for a while, and it didn't get better.

Lately, I have noticed that when I eat meat, I get sicker than I was before.. Not just one type of meat (IE: Turkey), but all meats. But today, my theory got even more of a push when I ate an egg for lunch.. It made me sicker...

I realized that it would explain why even eating Nothing but veggies (with Ranch Dressing) I still felt sick...

Maybe I have a problem with a meat protein...

Good GOD, does this mean I have to become a vegetarian?? I am really gonna cry now. :o :'( :ph34r:

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I have voted no to this question, but have to qualify my answer - I cannot eat beef that has been fed corn/hormones/antibiotics - only organic, grass-fed beef. No problems with any other meat, including meat that contains nitrates/nitrites, and no problems with eggs.

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I have voted no to this question, but have to qualify my answer - I cannot eat beef that has been fed corn/hormones/antibiotics - only organic, grass-fed beef. No problems with any other meat, including meat that contains nitrates/nitrites, and no problems with eggs.

Maybe I can try all organic meats.. It'll cost me an arm, a leg and probably my left nostril, but it is worth a shot!

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I can eat meat but not eggs. I have a diagnosed (IgG mediated) allergy to eggs. I used to have difficulty digesting meat. Then I read a book entitled "Why Stomach Acid is Good for You" by Jonathon Wright, MD and went to his clinic to get a Heidelberg capsule test for stomach acid production. That test showed that I very slowly produced only a little stomach acid.

Without adequate stomach acid, we can't digest meats or fats very well and don't absorb vital vitamins and minerals, like calcium, magesium and B vitamins. Normal levels of stomach acid also kills food born bacteria, parasites and fungi (like candida). Age, autoimmune diseases (like celiac disease) and using acid blockers can all cause inadequate stomach acid production.

Since my diagnosis of hypochloridia I've taken HCl supplements before each meal and I can easily digest any meats or fats. I also stopped getting gastrointestinal (bacteria, parasites and candida) infections, after having 8 during the past 4 years. Best of all I no longer have bloating and flatulence and I feel more satisfied after each meal.

If you have ever used acid blocker drugs or you get indigestion after eating meats, try drinking a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar dissolved in a little water before a meal with meat. If that improves your digestion, you might have inadequate stomach acid production. HOWEVER, I suggest you see a doc who can give you a Heidelberg capsule test for stomach acid production, before you try HCl supplements. If you used those while you have H. Pylori, achloridia or any damage to your stomach lining, you can seriously damage your stomach by using HCl supplements.

Before I was diagnosed and prescribed HCl capsules, I discovered that drinking ginger tea with meat/fat containing meals also helped digestion.

SUE

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Like the poster above, I would say look into stomach acid.

I am a life-long vegatarian, I had a lot of continuing problems after going gluten-free so I went on an elimination diet. The dietician I saw wanted to make sure I wasn't reacting to dairy or soy, and I couldn't handle beans, so I agreed to eat meat for a while, specifically lamb and chicken. It made me sick to my stomach. Over time I found that I don't digest fats or proteins to well, even after I cut the meat out.

I tried a hcl and pepsin supplement recently. I had mixed success in that it did end up causing some minor d after a while, but the amazing thing is that I went from having absolutely no appetite for days at a time to a regular appetite. It was so suprising that I wasn't sure what the feeling was at first! It seemed to help my stomach to empty, where before food would just sit in there and feel heavy, give me reflux etc. I took the pills for about a week and then stopped, and I intend to restart at some point to see if it can kick start my appetite and protein digestion.

I wouldn't say that you have to go vegetarian necessarily, but it would be a good idea to keep a detailed food diary, and then simplify what you are eating. Maybe try cooking the meat very low fat in case that is part of the problem. Try eating one type of meat at a time for a few days, and see if there are any that you can digest better. I found out that I had a bad reaction to chicken and eggs, and the reactions ranged from immediate to 1-2 days later. Also try small portion sizes and see if that helps.

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I voted no but I too have problems with some meats depending on their origin. Cc might be part of the problem as things got better after I started washing eggs well before putting them in the fridge (chicken eat wheat and lay eggs in straw) and washing all meat before cooking (to avoid cc from breaded stuff). For the same reason I stopped buying minced meat.

For some reason chicken fat makes me sick. I can only eat chicken when grilled until all the fat drips into the fire. Other animal fats are ok, though.

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I have been meat-and-egg free for seven years. This is because they seriously and directly upset my female hormones. This includes, surprisingly, the organic and free-range animal products. Thought I

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You might look at some of the RPAH Failsafe diet info if you seem to be reacting to all meat and eggs. There can be a lot of amines in meat and eggs and some people react. The solution is to find a source of very fresh meat.

http://failsafediet.wordpress.com/the-rpah-elimination-diet-failsafe/minimising-amine-formation-in-meat-dairy-and-eggs/

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Thanks Skylark, great link

Coincidentally, RPAH is in my

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I have voted no to this question, but have to qualify my answer - I cannot eat beef that has been fed corn/hormones/antibiotics - only organic, grass-fed beef. No problems with any other meat, including meat that contains nitrates/nitrites, and no problems with eggs.

I voted yes but I have a similar qualifier. I get violently ill after eating beef, it feels a bit like getting glutened but more painful and without the neuro symptoms. Seems like I really have to try grass-fed beef.

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My meat issues are a combination of things, best we can tell:

1. antibiotic residue in meat that were given antibiotics. I have allergies to antibiotics, and since going gluten-free, I seem to react even more.

2. Gluten CC on poultry skin from the processing and on any meat that's been cut up at the supermarket butcher's. Some seafood is processed in facilities where it gets CC too. I've bought some big pieces of meat at the supermarket from the butcher that are still sealed from the slaughterhouse.

Some other things I've learned along the way, however?

1. I've met a number of sensitive celiacs who have problems with eggs from chickens who are fed gluten grains. Don't know why - seriously, no idea - but they seem to be okay with eggs from chickens that aren't fed this, if I remember correctly. So...who knows?

2. I've read stories from a couple people with corn issues who have a lot of problems with processed meat. Most meat in the States is typically washed with a mild bleach solution and since a few e. coli scares, they are often washed with citric acid, which is often derived from corn. I'm not sure what meat form other countries is washed with, but you might want to look into it?

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