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Can Milk Contain Gluten?


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#1 Marz

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 10:47 PM

Post title should rather be "Can/Would companies add gluten to milk without declaring it on the label?", since I know milk is naturally "gluten free" :)

There is a certain brand of milk that they use at work, that always hurts my stomach and makes me feel ill. At home I always use "Clover", which is a slightly higher quality milk, made by a much bigger company. The one at work is a cheaper, smaller business. Clover milk is perfect, no problems whatsoever. Just tried a half glass of milk this morning and feeling great. The half glass of "work brand" milk yesterday made me double over with pain.

Could they possibly be adding some wheat starch to improve their protein nutritional profile? (That would be very dodgy though), or maybe they're just slack and are getting some gluten contamination somewhere (Anywhere from milking the cows to transport to packaging..?)

I'd love to order some test strips to check it out, and send them a very snarky letter about the quality of their milk, possibly blow the top off their little enterprise if they're adding stuff to their milk.

Anyone else had problems with specific brands of milk??
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Feb 2010 - Start of continuous GIT problems and panic attacks
July 2010 - Blood and biopsy -ve, went gluten free after testing which completely relieved symptoms
July 2011 - 1 year gluten free, food intolerances (Chicken, eggs, olives, goat milk) gone!

2012 - Soy no longer a problem
*************************************************************
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#2 mushroom

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 11:22 PM

Hmm, you must have left SA to be getting Clover milk :P It is a good product, used to use it. I have not heard of any additives to milk other than Vitamin D. There are of course the pasteurization and homogenization processes, both of which for me ruin milk - we used to be able to get raw milk in Sonoma. As for contamination, who knows.... do you know where the milk comes from?

The only other issues with milk I know of is if the protein in it is A1 or A2, A2 being the preferred by the cognizanti. There is some controversy going on about that down here in New Zealand with some dairy farmers trying to build up solely A2 herds. Most milk is a mix of 1 and 2. Fonterra, our big dairy conglomerate, would rather this subject were not discussed :blink: :o (their milk is mostly A1).
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#3 gabby

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 01:13 AM

Is it possible to buy a fresh, unopened package of the type of milk you use at work (like buy it from another store). Then take it home, and use it. If you get sick from the milk, then there's something in the milk that doesn't agree with you. If you don't get sick when you use it at home...then the culprit is likely cross-contamination from people at work possibly having gluten on their hands and then touching the milk carton.

Hope this helps. Good luck in figuring out your mystery...
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#4 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 03:08 AM

Is it possible to buy a fresh, unopened package of the type of milk you use at work (like buy it from another store). Then take it home, and use it. If you get sick from the milk, then there's something in the milk that doesn't agree with you. If you don't get sick when you use it at home...then the culprit is likely cross-contamination from people at work possibly having gluten on their hands and then touching the milk carton.

Hope this helps. Good luck in figuring out your mystery...


This was what I was thinking. I wonder, if the milk is open in the work fridge, if someone is slurping it down from the container after eating a gluten food. Some folks have really nasty habits when no one else is looking.
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celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
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Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

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HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#5 Pac

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 03:24 AM

This was what I was thinking. I wonder, if the milk is open in the work fridge, if someone is slurping it down from the container after eating a gluten food. Some folks have really nasty habits when no one else is looking.


I was thinking exactly the same.

On the other side, I too get sick from some milk brands while others are perfectly ok.
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#6 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 06:09 AM

I am very sensitive and I do find one brand of milk and cheese I do well with and the rest I can't tolerate. Gluten is in breast milk, I wonder if it could be from diet?
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#7 lovegrov

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 06:17 AM

Cow's milk does not contain gluten. Cows have a different digestion system than humans. I've never heard of anybody adding gluten to milk and if they added wheat in the U.S. it would have to be listed.

richard
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#8 cassP

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 06:35 AM

I am very sensitive and I do find one brand of milk and cheese I do well with and the rest I can't tolerate. Gluten is in breast milk, I wonder if it could be from diet?


i agree with this post. i mean i really hope it's not true.. but i did read recent articles suggesting it could be possible for gluten to be in some dairy- because it has been found in breast milk. i hope it's not the case- i do buy grass fed dairy products when im at whole foods- but they dont have grass fed everything.. or when im out like at starbux, i cant get grass fed & hormone free... maybe i should just get over my dairy addiction :/
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1986- Elevated Speckled ANA/no Lupus.negative Sjorgens
2008- AntiGliadin IGA/IGg~ Negative,TTG IGA/IGg~ Weak Positive, Endomysial Antibody~ Positive, IGA Deficient.
no biopsy (insurance denied)
6/2010- Enterolab Gene Test:
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HLA-DQB1 Allele 2 0302
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#9 Marz

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 07:04 AM

This was what I was thinking. I wonder, if the milk is open in the work fridge, if someone is slurping it down from the container after eating a gluten food. Some folks have really nasty habits when no one else is looking.


Gosh, I hope not! But I guess I'll try it if I can find a small container of the brand.
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Feb 2010 - Start of continuous GIT problems and panic attacks
July 2010 - Blood and biopsy -ve, went gluten free after testing which completely relieved symptoms
July 2011 - 1 year gluten free, food intolerances (Chicken, eggs, olives, goat milk) gone!

2012 - Soy no longer a problem
*************************************************************
Gluten intolerant

#10 Skylark

 
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Posted 03 December 2010 - 09:44 AM

There is no gluten in milk. Different breeds of dairy of cows make milks with slightly different casein profiles and if you're a little sensitive to alpha-casein (really common in celiacs) you might find some milks agree with you better than others.
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#11 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 04 December 2010 - 07:06 AM

There is no gluten in milk. Different breeds of dairy of cows make milks with slightly different casein profiles and if you're a little sensitive to alpha-casein (really common in celiacs) you might find some milks agree with you better than others.

I am sure that there is no gluten in milk within the 20 ppm suggested guidelines. That means that there is no gluten in milk as far as most celiacs are concerned. Based on my reaction I would say that the levels are much less than 5 ppm. I say this by comparing my reaction to milk and cheese to my reaction to an Amy's product which had been tested to below 5 ppm. Are you sure that there is no gluten in milk at very low levels? With the testing limits available currently, I don't know that anyone can definitively say that. Do you know of any studies looking at lower levels of gluten? I would love to know about them.
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#12 Skylark

 
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Posted 04 December 2010 - 02:33 PM

I am sure that there is no gluten in milk within the 20 ppm suggested guidelines. That means that there is no gluten in milk as far as most celiacs are concerned. Based on my reaction I would say that the levels are much less than 5 ppm. I say this by comparing my reaction to milk and cheese to my reaction to an Amy's product which had been tested to below 5 ppm. Are you sure that there is no gluten in milk at very low levels? With the testing limits available currently, I don't know that anyone can definitively say that. Do you know of any studies looking at lower levels of gluten? I would love to know about them.

I don't make this stuff up. ;) (Though I did confuse α- and β-caseins.) Here you go. By the way, all you would have had to do to search is type "celiac casein" into PubMed. It's really not hard at all to find literature. I do have the advantage of often being able to get full text because of where I work.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18752927
"Intolerance of celiac disease patients to bovine milk is not due to the presence of T-cell stimulatory epitopes of gluten."

"All assays used detect gluten levels as low as 1–3 ppm in various food matrices [5], [6], [7] and [8]. Nonetheless, no gluten proteins or gluten fragments could be detected above background in any of the bovine milk samples, whereas gluten was easily detected in spiked samples. Thus, no gluten could be detected in the milk from cows fed diets containing large amounts of wheat. Hence, the reported problems experienced by patients with celiac disease who consume bovine milk are unlikely due to the presence of gluten in the milk."


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19268534
"Bovine milk intolerance in celiac disease is related to IgA reactivity to α- and β-caseins"

It has been published that there is a high homology of some peptides in bovine β-casein to the gluten peptide, mainly with the amino acid sequence LQLQPFPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQPF [8]. Thus, the serum IgA response of patients with celiac disease to bovine milk could be related to gliadins and caseins sharing epitopes recognized by antigliadin IgA antibodies, as previously proposed [3].
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#13 Skylark

 
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Posted 04 December 2010 - 02:43 PM

Now where this comes in with Marz's original question is that there are two kinds of casein in milk, A1-beta casein and A2-beta casein. A1-beta casein is the kind of casein more likely to make us sick. You can learn more by doing some reading on A1 and A2 milk. Some breeds of cows make more A1-beta casein than others. Goat's milk is pure A2-beta casein, which is why some people can tolerate goat's milk better than cow's milk. (I'm one of those people.)
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#14 VioletBlue

 
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Posted 04 December 2010 - 05:04 PM

Actually, if that theory WERE correct, which I don't believe it is, I would think you'd be having a bigger problem with milk from grass fed cows rather than cows feed the generic feed lot mix of corn soy and whoknowswhat. Rye grass is common in most pastures as are certain strains of wheat grass. If the milk could be contaiminated by what the cows eat, you wouldn't want a grass fed cow giving you milk.


i agree with this post. i mean i really hope it's not true.. but i did read recent articles suggesting it could be possible for gluten to be in some dairy- because it has been found in breast milk. i hope it's not the case- i do buy grass fed dairy products when im at whole foods- but they dont have grass fed everything.. or when im out like at starbux, i cant get grass fed & hormone free... maybe i should just get over my dairy addiction :/


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#15 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 04 December 2010 - 07:04 PM

I don't make this stuff up. ;) (Though I did confuse α- and β-caseins.)

Thank you for the citations. Concentrations of gliadin in breast milk was in the range of 5 -1200 ng/ml which would be 0.01 - 2.4 ppm gluten. http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9867098 It would be interesting to see more sensitive tests of gluten in cows milk for comparison.
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