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Accurate Food Allergy Tests?
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8 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease, as well as other food allergies. I am new to this board, and I am thrilled with all of the information and support out there! I suspect that both of my children have issues with food allergies, and one specifically with gluten, and I am not sure which tests to request for them.

What is the most accurate gluten sensitivity test? blood/stool? (I was diagnosed originally with a stool analysis)

What is the most accurate food allergy test? One ped said blood tests were not accurate, and suggested a skin prick test, but another ped said the skin prick test was not accurate. I don't want to put my kids through unnecessary tests.

Thank you so much!

Laura

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None of the food allergy tests are that accurate. You have to use the tests to guide an elimination diet. Blood is somewhat better than skin prick.

As far as gluten, it's best for them to get a celiac blood test to start. If your child is not celiac, you can look to stool or simply try eliminating gluten. Eliminating gluten from the diet and seeing a good response is actually considerably more accurate than the stool testing.

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Thanks Skylark! I will try eliminating gluten to start and see what happens.

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Thanks Skylark! I will try eliminating gluten to start and see what happens.

Do remember that celiac tests don't work gluten free. You'll probably want to get the celiac panel run on the child you suspect has gluten issues just to be sure it's not celiac.

Good luck and I hope you figure out the allergies/intolerances!

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I have to agree with Skylark. I don't believe food allergy testing results are worth the paper they're printed on. :unsure:

Once you have eliminated gluten as the source of problems, then you should look to the other top eight allergens, which for those with gluten problems probably lead off with dairy, soy and corn. And the best way to do this is with elimination and a food and symptom diary. Much more reliable than any medical testing.

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I wish it was as simple as a test, I am still battling to find what foods bother myself and my daughter. I have celiac disease and also intolerant to quite a few things. I also found they have improved slightly over time I think when you first begin the gluten-free diet you are so sensitive to anything and it takes a long time for the gut to heal.

If you are having your child tested for celiac disease, make sure your child is eating lots of gluten when testing.

You can also have the FM testing which is Hydrogen Breath Testing if you suspect Fructose is a problem.

Lactose is blood testing.

Apart from those, I think its trial and elimination.

Good luck!

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Thank you for all of your responses! I will try the elimination diet, but it is tough to do with 4-year olds! I thought I could do a blood test, and find out quickly what the problems were, so as not to needlessly remove common food from their diet, but it really seems like the elimination diet is the way to go.

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Thank you for all of your responses! I will try the elimination diet, but it is tough to do with 4-year olds! I thought I could do a blood test, and find out quickly what the problems were, so as not to needlessly remove common food from their diet, but it really seems like the elimination diet is the way to go.

If your insurance covers it, you can guide the elimination test with allergy tests. Either skin or blood will pick up possible food allergies depending on what your doctor prefers. What you don't want to do is assume things that are positive in the allergy tests are actually a problem. Not all foods that show up in blood and skin tests are actually a problem.

This is an LA Times article that talks about the issue. http://tinyurl.com/26etyqt

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