Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Poll: gluten-free Diet - Easy Or Hard


  • Please log in to reply
46 replies to this topic

Poll: GF Diet: Easy or Hard, Broken Down by Years on Diet (76 member(s) have cast votes)

Select one of the following statements that is closest to being true for you:

  1. The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for more than three years. (18 votes [23.68%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 23.68%

  2. The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for more than one year but less than three years. (13 votes [17.11%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 17.11%

  3. The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for less than one year. (20 votes [26.32%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 26.32%

  4. The gluten-free diet is relatively hard and I have been gluten free for more than three years. (4 votes [5.26%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.26%

  5. The gluten-free diet is relatively hard and I have been gluten free for more than one year but less than three years. (5 votes [6.58%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 6.58%

  6. The gluten-free diet is relatively hard and I have been gluten free for less than one year. (16 votes [21.05%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 21.05%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#16 ravenwoodglass

ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,707 posts

Posted 13 December 2010 - 03:00 PM

Is this all rice milk or a certain brand? My mom's partner drinks it and she has been gluten-free for years. If it is all rice milk that mignt explain some recent tummy upsets. Please fill me in. Thanks!


Some rice milks are processed using barley. Rice Dream is the one that comes first to my mind but I don't know if there might be others. I use Wegmans brand rice milk that is for sure gluten free. I think maybe Pacific brand is also but not positive.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 kwylee

kwylee

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 303 posts

Posted 13 December 2010 - 03:05 PM

I had such severe neurological symptoms for so many years prior to my stumbling onto the gluten/casein/soy culprit, I honestly thought I was dying. Countless doctors disagreed, but I figured there had to be a yet undetected brain tumor or something of the sort that was making me feel weird and foggy and wobbly and tired all the time. I was right about the dying part, because I'm sure that gluten would have slowly but surely been my early demise. But because I went through such hell early on, I honestly have not had ONE solitary day where I wanted to cheat or feel sorry for myself, (which would be understandable).

Make no mistake, I'm not a Pollyanna. And I love to eat. I read the thoughts of others here and I keep seeing two situations coming up over and over, and I feel I have somehow been spared, and maybe this is making the difference for people who are struggling or unhappy (rightly so):

1. Family support - my husband is going to heaven, he's more careful than I am, and I'm fairly tight about it. My kids are grown and equally supportive. Sisters and brothers, no problem.
2. Ongoing symptoms - after withdrawal, mine cleared up beautifully and quickly. But I know that if that were not the case, if I were still feeling badly, my attitude would be VASTLY different.

So I read these posts and consider myself very lucky that all I have to do is avoid certain things, and the trade off is that I feel better than I have in 20 years. I wish it were the same for everyone. I know there are those who are struggling, and I do understand when they need to vent.
  • 0
K Wylee

Gluten Intolerant, Positive test, June 2010
Casein sensitivity, Positive test, June 2010
Reactive to soy, most processed foods & preservatives, June 2010

#18 wheeleezdryver

wheeleezdryver

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 197 posts

Posted 13 December 2010 - 03:43 PM

for me, going gluten free hasn't been easy, but it's easy compared to the other things I have to deal with in my life! As my siggy basically says, I'm a spousal caregiver to my DH.... and I myself have multiple autoimmune issues (and I'm 'only 34) And, right now, I'm trying to figure out fructose intolerance (ever try to figure out how much gluten-free stuff has fructose in it?. Yes, there are hard days (like last Saturday where i was at a support group Christmas Party and didn't bother telling me they were putting Lasagna & meatballs on my plate I couldn't see through the metal food service bar)....grrr (and this party was for a group of visually impaired people (who also appreciate being told WHAt & WHERE things are being put on their plate), and two of whom also have food allergies!).... but, like someone else said, 90% of the time, it's not hard.
  • 0
Becky (me)-35yo; hypothyroid 8yrs (symptoms at least 1 yr prior); Plantar Fasciitis (PF) (tendonitis in foot) 4 yrs; ovary & softball size cyst removed Feb 2008; Sleep Apnea 3yrs; Dec 2008- realized wheat affects hormones-- went semi- gluten-free (aka, gluten lite!). Interstitial Cystitis (IC, aka painful bladder syndrome) (self dx. controlled by diet- can't have acidic foods/ drinks). July 2010-- realized there was more going on, was going to do the sensitivity/ Celiac testing, decided it wasn't worth it! Am now truely learning to live the gluten- free lifestyle!
My DH-38 yo; born w/ Spastic cerebral palsy. legally blind, uses wheelchair. back surgery Aug 2007, has continued back troubles.

#19 burdee

burdee

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,400 posts

Posted 13 December 2010 - 03:45 PM

I was diagnosed with celiac and began to abstain from gluten in mid 2004. During 2006-7 I was also diagnosed with 6 other delayed reaction (IgG or IgA mediated) allergies. So I now have 7 total food restrictions (plus sorbitol, caffeine and alcohol sensitivies/intolerances). Compared to my current diet with 7 diagnosed restrictions, my original gluten free diet was a piece of (gluten free) cake! LOL

Nevertheless, I've discovered MANY safe and tasty substitutes for all my former favorite foods. I just feel blessed to have finally discovered what caused many of my painful gastro symptoms so that I can choose safe foods and enjoy eating again!

SUE
  • 1

Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#20 GFinDC

GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,123 posts

Posted 13 December 2010 - 06:36 PM

Voted The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for more than one year but less than three years. (6 votes [19.35%] - View)

The gluten-free part is pretty easy for me. I work at home most of the time but go to the office or work meetings sometimes and I can usually find some fruit to eat. Today I spent the day at our local office and had a banana and a small bag of Planters peanuts at the cafe for lunch. If I was at the office every day I'd be a packing my lunch for sure though, or just not eating during the day. Often when I go out for meetings I take a Lara bar with me for snacking in case I feel hungry. Finding all my other food intolerances was the thing that took me a while and made it hard while that was on-going. But I am right on the cuspy edge of 3 years now and it is what it is and that's ok. 'Snot a bad deal. :)
  • 1
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#21 sandsurfgirl

sandsurfgirl

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,355 posts

Posted 13 December 2010 - 07:55 PM

In the beginning it's so hard it feels impossible. But after you heal, learn the ropes, find some products you like and figure out which ones taste like cardboard it gets pretty easy.

There is so much awareness now that I don't find eating out difficult. It's a pain to have to ask all those questions but I find restaurants very accomodating. I ask politely and thank them a bunch of times. I also tip well.
  • 0
Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.
Ready to get well and get on with my life!

#22 BethJ

BethJ

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 161 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 10:10 AM

I've been gluten-free about 2 1/2 years now. At first it was hard. I was constantly afraid to eat anything without checking here or the manufacturers' websites. When I realized there are far more gluten-free foods out there than I realized, it became easier. I do most of my own cooking and while restaurants are a big concern, eating at friends' homes is what terrifies me.

It must be second nature to me now. I was doing the grocery shopping this morning and as I passed display after display of Christmas cookies, pastries, pie and cakes, I realized just how thankful I am that I can't eat all this stuff now! I'd probably be as big as a barn so celiac has actually done me a huge favor. :)
  • 0
Beth in Florida

Gluten-free since 7/19/08
Alcohol free since 6/28/10

#23 Loey

Loey

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,460 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 10:19 AM

Fairly straightforward poll here about whether you find the gluten free diet hard or easy and how long you've been on it. I realize that this is a simplification of the situation - that's the whole point. This isn't a "I find the gluten free diet convenient or not" sort of question, but rather "in the sum total of your life (not just the holidays, work, family gatherings, or travel, but on average 365 days of the year), is it relatively hard or relatively easy". Pick whatever answer is closest to true for you, and then explain away in a comment! :)

I wanted to add: if it *is* relatively hard for you, please say so!! We all have different life situations and personalities that will play into whether or not we find this particular thing in our life hard. Let other people get a good honest feel for what real people dealing with this in their real lives think.


I found that the gluten-free diet is relatively easy but have recently been diagnosed with an ulcer and IBS as well. That's a whole different combination of issues. I'm changing GI's and will hopefully be given guidance as my current one hasn't given me any. I was diagnosed the night before I moved o a new state (June 2010) and loved my old GI. My new one doesn't seem to know as much as the people on this forum do. God bless all of you!!!! And thanks for setting up the poll.

Loey



  • 0

#24 Nor_TX

Nor_TX

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 298 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 11:12 AM

I voted that it was relatively hard and less than three years. It has been about 1 1/2 years. I am almost 61 and it is very difficult to change your attitude about food. I worked in the food magazine industry for many years and developed a taste for lots of different kinds of foods which for the most part I can no longer eat.

I work in an elementary school where parents provide food everyday - treats and lunches. Most of these I can't participate in.

I don't bake bread or make involved recipes anymore - it is easier to eat simply. I am very lucky because my husband supports my food choices and he accepts that he and I usually don't have the same meals, or that mine is altered. When I make spaghetti for instance I end up using almost all my pots. One for his pasta, one for mine, one for his sauce, one for mine, one for my sauteed mushrooms, one for the ground meat...

I figure that with my health issues - Colitis, Arthritis and gluten and dairy free... I am pretty lucky to have what I have in my life.
  • 1
Gluten Intolerance, Colitis, IBS, Lactose and Casein Intolerance, Gastro-Paresis, GERD, Arthritis. Taking Remicade and Asacol, 2 Prilosec/day among other meds. Officially a senior citizen! New knee is doing well.. now about that other knee...

Food is in my dreams and in my nightmares!

#25 lisa25

lisa25

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 59 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 01:06 PM

It has been almost three years for me. I voted that it was relatively easy to do, just not always the most fun emotionally when I see others eating whatever they want. I am very fortunate that my husband is also celiac and whether diagnosed or not with the other food sensitivities, we both feel better without gluten, dairy, soy, corn, and eggs. Now that we eat at home 99% of the time and make most of our food from scratch, it is quite easy to make something that is safe to eat even though I do still have moments where I get grumpy after a long day at work about having to cook "again" and "there doesn't seem to be anything easy/quick to make". I just try to keep a few quick treats around like coconut ice cream and gummy bears made without corn syrup I found at Whole Foods...esp for the pregnancy cravings when everything on t.v. looks good :) I also like to bake which helps. Having strong reactions to CC (neuro especially) for me helps me not want to cheat and to be thankful that I am finally getting things figured out.
  • 1
Lisa

Gluten Free 2/08
Dairy & Soy Free 8/08
Corn & Egg Free 3/10

Lots of autoimmune in family, no diagnosed celiacs. Non-supportive doctors...told there was nothing wrong with me. Tested by Enterolab. Diagnosed with reactive hypoglycemia (6/10). Doing much better managing hypoglycemia in addition to no eggs or corn.

#26 T.H.

T.H.

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,816 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 03:15 PM

I voted difficult, and I've been doing it for a bit over a year now. I don't find sticking to the diet hard - I feel too crummy off of it to even WANT to cheat. But finding foods I can eat, and making them whenever I go out? That's been pretty much an absolute nightmare for both me and now my daughter. The amount of cooking I have to do now is also something I don't really enjoy all that much, and food prep takes about 6 hours on the days I cook, and if I'm lucky, I can have leftovers for the next day and only have to do this every other day, plus one day a week for essentially cooking and food prep the entire day.

My dad is celiac, and while he complains, I look at what he does and it doesn't seem that hard. New foods, being careful about contamination, and reading labels. We'd been through this once already when we found out my son had dairy problems, so I thought: no problem. But after trial and error and false starts over perceived food allergies and intolerances, we've finally figured out that we are so sensitive to gluten that we react to foods that contain less gluten than even most extremely low gluten companies test for (5ppm). Thought my daughter could take more, it's looking like she can't. We even recently went to an allergist and discussed this with him, and showed him our food logs and results, and he's agreeing with my conclusion: it's looking like celiac disease problems, not allergies.

So just to give a taste of what it's like to find food we can eat, or make a meal, here we go.

For produce, I get to find out the farm that grew it. For fruits in trees, I have to ask about waxes, coatings, or sprays that might have been used on them and if they have anything that is gluten-derived. Even corn or soy derived is iffy. If it's fruits or veggies on the ground, I have to check out everything that they might rest on or that is poured over them or contacts them. Does the mulch have any gluten grains or straw in it, including oat straw? Is there any straw used to cover the fruit (strawberries and mushrooms can have this)? Are any gluten grains grown near to their other produce? Are any animals that live/excrete near any of the produce fed gluten grains - sometimes chickens have been used to keep bugs down, but they are fed supplemental grains that often contaminate the ground. Is there fish emulsion used (gluten CC)? Slug bait? Gluten cover crops that are dug back into the soil? Compost that contains gluten containing grains?

Usually, they know some of the answers, but the others...they buy their compost or substances used in their compose, or their chemicals, from someone else. So they call up, or I have to make more phone calls, and more phone calls. And more often than not, in the end, I can't use their stuff anyway. It's frustrating, time consuming, and we're still trying to find things that we can eat and stay healthy.


Anything processed, nearly, is out. We found an olive oil that seems okay, and I believe a salt. We buy our meat from special sources, i have a bulk quinoa from bolivia that we're testing to make sure it's okay, but the others have all had trouble with processing, soap used on machines, transporting, packaging materials or cleansers....

So, for cooking? Here's the cooking for one dish, which ended up STILL causing trouble, but it's relatively good example. It was a mustard chicken. So first, I spent about 5-10 minutest washing mustard seeds, then prepare the mustard over about 36 hours with vinegar and a few other ingredients. I took 3 hours to make home made chicken broth. I went out and picked fresh herbs that I've been growing just for such an occasion because the store bought ones make us sick, and the gardening takes about an hour a day to maintain - more, soon, as I'm adding as much as I can so I have more to eat. I made the sauce that I used the mustard in, taking about 20-30 minutes. Then actually cooked the dish, which took about 1 1/2 hours of labor there.

And my daughter got sick off of it, because that brand of vinegar and mustard seeds seem to be big no-no's for our level of sensitivity.

It's pretty much derailed my life, at this point. I feel more like I'm living on the prairie (which I'm sure my mother, an actual farmer, would mock me and my soft life for, honestly). I really do think this has been terribly difficult, for the whole family. It's also fairly isolating, because even among celiacs, we're still in the minority, so gluten free potlucks and such are a total disaster for us. We have to bring our own food everywhere. Trying to find new sources of food when we go to a new place for a trip has so far been a failure, although we've only tried twice. Christmas will be try #3. We'll see how it goes.


However, with all the trouble, all the extra time, all the frustration? What is NOT difficult is staying away from gluten. It's so miserable getting sick, I can't imagine NOT doing this work to find good food, at this point. I'm absolutely willing to put in the extra effort to get safe food...just not always the extra effort to make it taste good. :-P
  • 0

T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#27 sa1937

sa1937

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,657 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 04:23 PM

I find the gluten-free diet to be relatively easy and I've only been at this for 8 months now. The most difficult was my first grocery shopping trip, which took forever, but I can maneuver the store without any problem now. If only manufacturer's labels would be easy to read...no red background with tiny black words.

I've been cooking forever and many things I prepare now are things I've prepared all my life or there are easy substitutes for many ingredients. Baking is a continual learning experience and I am still trying for that "perfect" loaf of bread, which has remained elusive. Thankfully my local health food store started carrying Udi's. I cringe at paying $6.19 a loaf but it's cheaper than eating out, which I basically don't. My friends and family have been great and are quite aware of what I can and can't eat...or ask me about certain ingredients if they are unsure.

One advantage is that I live alone and have total control over my kitchen and don't have to worry about preparing separate meals or have little glutenous fingers all over everything.

Of course, I miss the spontaneity of being able to grab a quick bite to eat somewhere. Or stopping at the deli for fried chicken. But then I do keep a stash of home-cooked foods or soups in my freezer that can solve that problem. And I always have something safe to munch on in my purse.

So my consensus is that it's a PIA at times but totally manageable without too much trouble. Posted Image
  • 0
Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#28 sa1937

sa1937

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,657 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 04:30 PM

I voted difficult, and I've been doing it for a bit over a year now. I don't find sticking to the diet hard - I feel too crummy off of it to even WANT to cheat. But finding foods I can eat, and making them whenever I go out? That's been pretty much an absolute nightmare for both me and now my daughter. The amount of cooking I have to do now is also something I don't really enjoy all that much, and food prep takes about 6 hours on the days I cook, and if I'm lucky, I can have leftovers for the next day and only have to do this every other day, plus one day a week for essentially cooking and food prep the entire day.

WOW! If I had to go through what you do, I'd have voted difficult, too.
  • 0
Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#29 naiiad

naiiad

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 69 posts

Posted 18 December 2010 - 03:02 PM

I've been gluten free for a little less then a year and it's still incredibly difficult for me. Even after all this time I still get a reaction about once every two weeks, sometimes more. I don't know if I'm just being negligent or what, but it's an ongoing stress for me.

Cross-contamination is a big issue for me. I have a big family and a busy/messy kitchen. I try to label my food but sometimes my family uses my stuff without thinking. I've also realized that I need to stay away from anything pre-packeged save for a few products i use regularly.

After a bad reaction earlier today (from either a pan that wasn't cleaned properly, or cheese that touched bread or something) I set up my own min-fridge in the living room... so I hope that helps.

I suck lol
  • 0

#30 Skylark

Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts

Posted 18 December 2010 - 03:16 PM

Cooking gluten-free is not particularly hard; the hard thing is the overall impact on my lifestyle. I barely ever eat out, and I have to cook a lot more than I would otherwise. I used to love to explore "hole in the wall" ethnic restaurants, and that is not an option for me any more because I cannot generally communicate my needs well enough. Traveling takes a tremendous amount of research to find gluten-free restaurants in a particular area. I was very careful in Mexico and still came home sick.

I am not one to make a big deal of this and as I said I do not find the cooking hard. But when I look at it honestly, the diet has made a fairly large impact on my life.
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: