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Poll: gluten-free Diet - Easy Or Hard


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Poll: GF Diet: Easy or Hard, Broken Down by Years on Diet (76 member(s) have cast votes)

Select one of the following statements that is closest to being true for you:

  1. The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for more than three years. (18 votes [23.68%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 23.68%

  2. The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for more than one year but less than three years. (13 votes [17.11%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 17.11%

  3. The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for less than one year. (20 votes [26.32%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 26.32%

  4. The gluten-free diet is relatively hard and I have been gluten free for more than three years. (4 votes [5.26%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.26%

  5. The gluten-free diet is relatively hard and I have been gluten free for more than one year but less than three years. (5 votes [6.58%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 6.58%

  6. The gluten-free diet is relatively hard and I have been gluten free for less than one year. (16 votes [21.05%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 21.05%

Vote Guests cannot vote

46 replies to this topic

#31 Loey

 
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Posted 18 December 2010 - 03:21 PM

I've been gluten free for a little less then a year and it's still incredibly difficult for me. Even after all this time I still get a reaction about once every two weeks, sometimes more. I don't know if I'm just being negligent or what, but it's an ongoing stress for me.

Cross-contamination is a big issue for me. I have a big family and a busy/messy kitchen. I try to label my food but sometimes my family uses my stuff without thinking. I've also realized that I need to stay away from anything pre-packeged save for a few products i use regularly.

After a bad reaction earlier today (from either a pan that wasn't cleaned properly, or cheese that touched bread or something) I set up my own min-fridge in the living room... so I hope that helps.

I suck lol


You don't suck. Our dietary restrictions do. Thankfully we have each other on this forum. I'm blessed to have a family that has chosen to eat gluten-free with me (well my son is away at college most of the year but he deals with it when he's home). I'm extremely to getting CC'd and also have triggers that I'm still trying to figure out. If I was following a strictly gluten-free diet I think it would be a bit easier but I have an ulcer and IBS. I go see a new doctor in January (YAY).

Just hang in there and try to have a healthy and happy holiday.

Healing Hugs,
Loey



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#32 Monklady123

 
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Posted 18 December 2010 - 03:31 PM

I'm gluten-free less than a year and so far I've found it to be pretty hard. We have lots of meals at church -- potlucks or working lunches, etc. -- plus the issue of communion is still unresolved. I go out to breakfast regularly with a friend and that's not working now... I seem to be getting more sensitive to cc the longer I'm gluten free.

So yes it's hard. But -- I felt so awful before that I have NO desire to eat any of it. I mean yes, I do wish I could eat pizza or something like that when I see others eating it. But when it comes right down to it and I imagine biting into whatever it is and then thinking about how bad I'll feel...well I won't. :ph34r:
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#33 sb2178

 
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Posted 18 December 2010 - 04:05 PM

Monklady-- is your church relaxed enough that you could make rice/teff/buckwheat wafers and have them consecrated? Then just store them yourself and bring on the days you'll need them.
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2/2010 Malabsorption becomes dramatically noticable
3/2010 Negative IgA EMA; negative IgA TTG
4/2010 Negative biopsy
5/2010 Elimination diet; symptoms begin to resolve on gluten-free diet round two (10 days)
5/2010 Diagnosed gluten sensitive based on weakly positive repeat IgA & IgG TTGs and dietary response; decline capsule endoscopy.

Now, what to do about my cookbook in progress? Make it gluten-free?

#34 Monklady123

 
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Posted 18 December 2010 - 04:57 PM

Monklady-- is your church relaxed enough that you could make rice/teff/buckwheat wafers and have them consecrated? Then just store them yourself and bring on the days you'll need them.

Oh yes, we're totally open to all that. It's just that I hate to cook! lol.. And before celiac I had never -- seriously -- baked from scratch. :P So I'm hopeless in the kitchen.

Someone suggested using rice crackers but I was holding out for something more "bread like". It's a work in progress. lol..
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#35 cahill

 
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Posted 18 December 2010 - 05:46 PM

gluten free is a piece of gluten free cake. :lol: But oh, the other-things free :P Now that is hard.

I Have to agree with this
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#36 Juliebove

 
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Posted 18 December 2010 - 06:35 PM

I didn't click on the poll because I myself am not gluten-free. Daughter is. And has been for about 6 years. I just had a problem with the terms "easy" and "hard". On the surface it seems so easy! I remember my friend putting her daughter on a gluten-free diet to see if her situation would change. I don't know exactly what she was looking for to change. AFAIK this daughter had no medical issues. Other two daughters did. This one had learning and behavioral difficulties. She told me it was easy. Just switch rice for pasta and potatoes for bread.

I have a feeling this kid was still getting tons of gluten. This woman did not appear to read any nutrition labels. She often fed her kids Rice A Roni and let them eat the noodles out of Ramen packets without cooking them. She took the seasoning packets from them because she said they were on a low sodium diet.

So I was shocked to see that she was giving the kids Gatorade. When I pointed out to her that it was loaded with sodium, she flipped out. Her husband was in the kitchen at the time and he agreed with me. So she then checked the label and said I was right. But she still kept giving it to them.

I also felt she didn't feed her kids enough. The youngest one weighed only 20 pounds at age 3. This is not the kid that had been on the gluten-free diet. And BTW she only tried the diet for a couple of weeks. I also think she was clueless about cross contamination and the like. Anyway, she once invited my daughter for lunch. She opened a small can of Spaghetti O's for four kids. Served cold. And when she invited me for lunch she gave me a single slice of white bread spread very thinly with peanut butter then folded it over. That was it! Luckily the Dr. stepped in, gave her a list of serving sizes and told her she needed to make sure the girl got enough food. I think the older kids were just more adept at sneaking food which they often did. And often got punished for. But I digress.

When Angela was first diagnosed, it seemed easy on the surface. Perhaps not so easy for her. She could no longer eat the school lunch. I have been told (don't know if it is true) that if I press the issue, the school would have to provide her with suitable food. But she has additional food allergies so it would be quite difficult for her and as happened to her when she went to camp with school she might be stuck eating the same thing day after day. gluten-free pasta, apples and sunbutter sandwiches on Ener-G bread.

Many were the times I glutened her in those early days because the labeling laws were not as good as they are today. I was giving her Mentos not realizing that they contained glucose syrup. Yes I know it can be gluten-free but she also has a wheat allergy so she shouldn't have had it at all. It now says it has wheat on it. But I didn't know that then. I also didn't know that she needed a separate toaster.

So I guess it is easy from the standpoint of... Once you know what to look for and what to do, the diet is easy to do. If you eat at home or maybe buy things from the grocery store and put together a meal on the fly.

But if you are eating at a restaurant or have to eat away from home and have no access to a grocery store, it does get harder. Angela has two dance conventions coming up and I know I will have to pack food for the both of us. There are food places around there but I do not know if we can get suitable fare.

And I guess it can be hard psychologically. For daughter it is an allergy and not celiac. So different from the standpoint of testing. The Dr. told her she wanted her to eat little bites of the allergens and then she would retest her. So we went to Costco and the grocery store hoping they would have samples of such foods. They did. She ate a little cube of whole wheat bread and acted sooo happy! I felt bad for her. Now when she sees the bread in the store she says I should let her try it again.

Sometimes I think it would just be easier if I could let her eat bread again. And not have to worry about wheat in sauces and prepared food. Then again, I don't eat those things for the most part because of my allergies. There are a few kinds of bread that are safe for me. But most could be cross contaminated (if not contain) dairy, egg or nuts. I also do the gluten-free pasta because most of it does not contain eggs.
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#37 Juliebove

 
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Posted 18 December 2010 - 06:39 PM

Some rice milks are processed using barley. Rice Dream is the one that comes first to my mind but I don't know if there might be others. I use Wegmans brand rice milk that is for sure gluten free. I think maybe Pacific brand is also but not positive.


The brand that Albertsons sells is not safe for us but I can't remember why. Could be that it contains one of our other allergens.
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#38 Lincoln

 
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Posted 19 December 2010 - 08:17 PM

I haven't even been on the gluten free diet for a month yet but have to say I find it quite easy, however speaking to one of my friends who has never attempted to cook anything more than pre-cut chips he said that I would 'pretty much have to have a chef with me constantly', naturally I was very puzzled by this until I realised that having a lot of cooking knowledge does make it significantly easier than not having any at all. But I feel sorry for anyone who doesn't cook gluten intolerant or not.
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Coeliac (diagnosed December 2010)
Crohn's
Soy intolerance
Dairy free

#39 sahm-i-am

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 05:13 AM

I voted hard less than one year only because the "diet" is so all-encompassing. It is more of a life-style change than a diet. (I hate the word diet actually, since it sounds like a choice, especially when people make New Year's Resolutions! ;) ).

It has been hard, but do-able, learning how to read labels, reading and educating myself and family and friends, changing habits and traditions for all the 'firsts' during the first year.

It has been hard dealing with the roller coaster of emotions me and my family have gone through. I try to keep life 'normal' for the non-gluten free family but in reality, all our lives have changed, some more than others.

It has been hard because I'm a spoiled southern belle, only child, who has really never had any crisis to deal with. Oh yes, I can honestly admit that! It's true, what can I say, but that doesn't mean I'm snobish, mean or selfish.

I am so thankful for ingredients on food labels. I am so thankful for this forum - a life saver! Those two things have made living Gluten Free much, much easier!

I am so thankful and happy that I have gained weight and energy since going gluten free. I appreciate my life and being there for family.

I'm sure if you asked me this same question next year, I will reply easy! Just not there yet! :-)
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Diagnosed with Lymphoma March 2010. After surgery doctors said "Oops!"
Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2010. After endoscopy doc said "Aren't you glad?"
Uhhh.....yeah!
DD #1 ('99) tested negative on bloodwork but positive on 2 genetic markers. Went gluten free in July 2010 and has been symptom-free ever since!
DD #2 ('98) tested negative and has no symptoms. Didn't fork out money for genetic testing. Will watch and test regularly.
Husband tested positive in July 2010 and has refused to go gluten free. Uh huh, that's gonna bite him in the a** one day! (Pun intended!)

#40 rustycat

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:05 AM

I voted relatively hard, but I think it's also because of all the other foods I have to avoid: dairy, all grains, beef, pork, eggs, garlic. So many of the gluten free non-grain prepared foods have garlic or eggs in them. I finally found a soup stock that I can use, so that's really helped. I'm hoping that with time I'll be able to start eating some rice again and maybe small amounts of garlic.

I'm trying to stay upbeat, but it's taking a lot of time to make all of my food from scratch. I'm sure I'll adjust with time, but I'm finding it pretty frustrating right now.
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Rickets (severe Vitamin D deficiency) shortly after birth
First trip to Dr with severe C, age 7
Infertility, multiple miscarriages, eventually adopted 2 boys (not related)
2010: Negative celiac blood test, but staying on gluten free diet due to vast improvement in all symptoms
2011: June - started low salicylate diet to improve rosacea - it worked really well!
2012: May - started Paleo way of eating. Emotions and blood sugar seem to have evened out. Brain fog vanished.

2013: May - after 4 month elimination diet, was able to add back dairy, but nightshades are gone for good (my arthritis is gone, too!!!)


#41 Lunabell

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:17 AM

Right now, I am finding it easy because it is so new. It is all a novelty and we are having fun making new discoveries. Plus, my daughter is only 4, so it relatively easy to control available foods. I don't know that it will be as easy for her as she moves out in the world and potentially feels different.

I have a feeling that once the novelty wears off and we all get through our testing that reality will sink in. I think it will probably get harder before it gets easier again.
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Jo
Rai-10-epilepsy, cortical dysplasia, hemispherectomy, cognitive and physical delays, negative celiac bloodwork
Mira-6- no known health issues
Laura-5-celiac (12/10)

#42 jenngolightly

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:30 AM

It's just that I hate to cook! lol.. And before celiac I had never -- seriously -- baked from scratch. :P So I'm hopeless in the kitchen.

This was me, too. We ate out - a lot! I was always sick after we ate, dh had to drive home and I'd be in miserable pain. I never knew why.

I was an extremely picky eater.

Since the diagnosis, though. I've learned to cook, and have learned to like my food. I got a few cookbooks to start with. Then I bought "food" magazine. Then I went to websites for gluten-free recipes. I bought spices.

A lot of my meals are hit and miss still, but I keep trying.

It helped for me to buy a lot of gadgets so I can make the recipes without improvising tools. I don't bake, but I do everything else. Baking is too temperamental.
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Jenn
dx celiac 9/2007: gluten-free 9/2007
corn intolerant: corn-free 5/2010
nut allergy: nut-free 8/2010

#43 tennisman

 
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Posted 21 December 2010 - 07:39 AM

I voted for : The gluten-free diet is relatively easy and I have been gluten free for more than three years
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Diagnosed with Coeliac disease in 2003

#44 julandjo

 
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Posted 21 December 2010 - 09:05 AM

I'm less than one year in, and it's extremely difficult for me. If it were just gluten I have to avoid it'd be a walk in the park. But I have literally 9 foods (incl. sea salt!) I can eat, and if I'm even barely CC'd by anything else I'm a wreck. This has been the biggest struggle of my life. :(
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Dx'd with Celiac June 2010 via positive biopsy. I got tested because both of my kids (3 and 5 years old) have multiple food intolerances, with gluten being the worst offender.

Free of: grains, dairy, soy, legumes, nightshades, nuts, fish, eggs, pork, citrus and tropical fruits (latex allergy), stone fruits, melons, squash, strawberries, flax, cruciferous veggies and celery.

Yes, I'm HUNGRY.

#45 sahm-i-am

 
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Posted 29 December 2010 - 04:00 PM

I'm less than one year in, and it's extremely difficult for me. If it were just gluten I have to avoid it'd be a walk in the park. But I have literally 9 foods (incl. sea salt!) I can eat, and if I'm even barely CC'd by anything else I'm a wreck. This has been the biggest struggle of my life. :(


I just wanted to say how extremely sorry I am for you. I can't imagine what it must be like to be able to eat only 9 foods. I pray that it gets easier for you and your little sweeties. Gosh, I hope it does. Do you think as you start healing you will be able to introduce different foods?
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Diagnosed with Lymphoma March 2010. After surgery doctors said "Oops!"
Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2010. After endoscopy doc said "Aren't you glad?"
Uhhh.....yeah!
DD #1 ('99) tested negative on bloodwork but positive on 2 genetic markers. Went gluten free in July 2010 and has been symptom-free ever since!
DD #2 ('98) tested negative and has no symptoms. Didn't fork out money for genetic testing. Will watch and test regularly.
Husband tested positive in July 2010 and has refused to go gluten free. Uh huh, that's gonna bite him in the a** one day! (Pun intended!)




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