Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Food Banned From The Classroom? Yipee! Lol
0

4 posts in this topic

I noticed this on Delphi and thought it warrented being displayed over here, as well.

http://www2.townonline.com/lexington/local...rticleid=272735

Nuts, food canned in classrooms

By Bethan L. Jones/ Staff Writer

Thursday, June 23, 2005

With the trees and plants in full bloom, many residents are feeling the inconvenient effects of seasonal allergies; a runny nose, itchy eyes and the cause of those killer afternoon headaches, sinus pressure.

For most, allergies are just a quick blip on the way to summer, a week when a certain plant causes a reaction. For a growing number of school-age children, however, allergies are a serious day in-day out concern.

According to the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in December 2003, the incidence of children with serious peanut allergies has doubled in the past five years. In a study by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 374 students between September 2001 and May 2005 had anaphylactic reactions in school.

In Lexington, 159 children in the nine public schools suffer from life threatening allergies ranging from tree nuts to latex.

Starting in September, a new allergy policy will be in place calling for all faculty to be trained in allergy awareness and the use of an EpiPen, a hypodermic needle used to inject a patient with epinephrine to help prevent anaphylaxes.

The policy will also end the tradition of food in the classrooms, including parties, and will continue of nut free tables at the elementary level.

Jane Franks, a former allergy and immunology nurse and the coordinator for school health services, is the author of the new policy and a strong advocate of keeping Lexington's allergy policy at the cutting edge. Lexington wrote its original policy six years ago, the first in the state, which was used by numerous other schools and the Department of Public Health in setting state allergy guidelines.

"[The policy] creates a safer environment for all students," said Franks from her office at Lexington High School.

Currently at all Lexington schools, on-site nurses maintain a supply of EpiPens in case of a student reaction. According to Franks, approximately 25 percent of reactions at school are first-time reactions. All students with serious known allergies are required to have an individual health plan which, under the new policy, will be designed by the student's allergist or primary care physician and be signed off by the child's parent or guardian.

One of the most noticeable areas of change will be the elimination of parties, bake sales or any other event which would bring food into the classroom. Under the current policy, only classrooms with identified allergy students have been made food free but as of September, food will not be allowed in any classroom.

Franks said the decision may sound harsh but the change has proved successful for the well-being of the students, promoting a healthier attitude to food. At Bowman Elementary School this academic year, several teachers tried food-free classrooms and found it so successful, they, with the help of the Bowman nurse, have written a handbook to help guide other teachers.

Rather than cupcakes on a child's birthday, teachers can invite the student's parent or grandparent to come in and read the student's favorite story. Instead of eating Chinese food to celebrate Chinese New Year, students can learn origami.

"There are lots of things you can do which ... focus on cultural events," said Franks, adding in other school districts like Newton which have enforced food-free classrooms, students can wear a special cape or have a birthday chair cover.

Harrington kindergartners were started with food-free classrooms this year with success. Franks said the change in culture will be beneficial to all students, not just those suffering from allergies, citing the increase in juvenile diabetes, gluten and lactose intolerance and childhood obesity. She added the removal of food will also help stunt the unhealthy association of sweet foods as a reward for good behavior, a practice which has limited effect on classroom performance and a lifelong effect on a personal response to food.

"We have to make sure all kids have healthy food choices," said Franks. "The policy lays the groundwork for developing the wellness policy we are required to have in September of 2006."

In 2006, all school districts will have to have a comprehensive wellness policy which will promote physical education and activity, health education with a focus on nutrition and how the schools promote food choices for students.

School lunches will have to meet federal guidelines, and food as rewards or any other way extra food is added to students diets addressed. There is also state legislation pending which would require all public schools to have a full-time nurse at each school in a district. Lexington presently has a nurse at each building.

At the School Committee meeting Tuesday night, where the new policy was unanimously passed, the committee praised the work of Franks and the other nurses who revamped the policy.

"The old policy holds up fairly well but this new policy is an advance for us," said Committee Member Scott Burson. "It is really meeting the needs of the students."

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I'd love the handbook they create so that I can pass it along at my son's school. I know our school is concienctious *sp about foods. We have a no peanut table marked in the cafeteria. Our wonderful lunch lady used to pass out starburst, but when it was pointed out that a diabetic child had moved into the school, she bought an apple corer and went from child to child slicing up their apples when they were finished eating. You never saw so many apples being chosen at a school lunch.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how they will handle students with hypoglycemia or diabetes who require immediate foods when they begin to feel rough? Surely their policy will address such issues.

When will they catch on that the federal guidelines still allow white flour and fried foods in all meals? That needs to be addressed as well for all the students' well-being. Just try being a celiac disease patient and finding something to eat in a lunch room at a public school!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,681
    • Total Posts
      921,725
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I also only really eat one meal a day and always after I get home. I never really feel hungrey. I call it 'Pavlov's dog in reverse'.  I think it comes from so many years of food making me sick. I have gotten to the point where I now at least can eat a sandwhich and some fruit during the day but it wasn't a quick process. When folks get like that it is very important to make sure that one meal has a good amount of both calories and nutrtion.  If your diet is how you describe you are starving yourself.  You need to get yourself used to eating again.  What helped me was carrying a baggie with some nuts and dry fruit with maybe even a handful of gluten free pretzels and always some chocolate baking chips. I just ate couple pieces when I thought of it throughout the day. A little bit of cheese and a couple safe crackers, a piece of fruit or a small tin or individual serving snack pack are also good. You need to get some nutrition during the day so you can feel up to cooking a simple full meal  for dinner. I hope your feeling better soon.
    • Ok, I can't seem to find my first lot of blood tests that were done for Celiac screening, they did include TTG I remember that much, and I am getting another copy of it but another test did come in today.  I don't know how different tests are done around the world and I don't get all the medical jargon but this is what it states, ******************************************************************************* HLA DR/DQ Genotyping for Coeliac Disease, Specimen type : EDTA blood Method : Detection of sequence-specific oligonucleotides (Gen-Probe). HLA-DR - 1, 13          DRB1 - 01, 13 HLA-DQ - 5,6        HLA-DQA1 - 5,6      HLA-DB1 - 05, 06 Interpretation : No genotype susceptibility for coeliac disease.  The DQ2 and DQ8 antigens associated with increased risk of coeliac disease were not identified in this patient.  In the absence of these antigens, coeliac disease is extremely unlikely.   *******************************************************************************   I have read the horror stories of blood tests and scope biopsies not be done right or flawed but here is what I do know as of now, At the moment the most non invasive test I can have done say negative.  I have double scopes (endoscopy and colonoscopy) booked for the 12th of October with results from biopsies expected a week or two after. Chances are they will show, a) signs of coeliac disease (even if the odds are low it can still happen), b) show signs of something else entirely and we will be busy dealing with the ramifications of that or c) it will show no signs of coeliac but I will still be suffering from gluten sensitivity (which is harder/impossible to measure clinically). My GP has told me that stress and anxiety can be a cause of all the symptoms I have been experiencing and suggests if the scopes show nothing that I may benefit from something to treat anxiety, i.e. antidepressants.  Not in a, "Oh we don't know what it is so have these," kind of way, he agrees with the thought that the scopes could indeed show coeliac, something else or even be negative. I did tell him that I could have a sensitivity and that even without benefit of clinical results, some people have gone on a gluten elimination diet for a period of time to see if they get any relief.  My question is this, if the scopes come up negative and I try eliminating gluten, how long would it be before I saw any results or improvements?  I have read enough here and elsewhere to know that everybody is different, some see results within days, some see results longer but are there any guidelines for how long a test like this should be undertaken for?  I have heard everything thing from two weeks to two months.  All of this is entirely moot at this point but I know that even if the results said clear, there would always be a little part of me that wonders if it could be a sensitivity that is the problem.  Any thoughts or advice greatly appreciated, and a thank you to all those who have taken the time to respond and offer advice and encouragement so far.        
    • We don't delete accounts but can delete any personal information and change your screen name if you would like. Just send me a personal message with three possible screen names. For the record you can edit most things in your account area with the exception of your screen name.
    • Thanks I never heard of that dye before, I guess I have to find more natural meat thanks for the suggestion. 
    • Yes, I only eat one meal a day. Sometimes salad or fries or whatever I can find. And thanks for the replies again.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,681
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Misalina
    Joined