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Soy; Bad Or Ok?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 rockectman

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:07 AM

Is soy ok for celiacs to eat or is it one of those individual things like oatmeal?
Also, is being gluten sensitive have the same damaging effects on your villi as
a full blown celiac has? I dont get as sick as alot of people on here when glutenated
but I think I could be still getting the same damage as a full blown celiac, of which
I still consider myself a celiac. Sometimes the pain on my side is so bad I can barely
walk straight up.


Thanks.....Derrick
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#2 psawyer

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:26 AM

Soy is gluten-free, but some people, including some celiacs, are unable to eat it. It is one of the FDA's top eight allergens, so it must be clearly disclosed on labels in the USA.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#3 mushroom

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:32 AM

Soy is an individual thing, Derrick. There do seem to be a lot of us who do not tolerate it, but gluten and soy sensitivities do not go hand in hand. Some people think it's bad for everyone because of its hormonal effect but soy is generally considered to be a safe edible.

As for damage from gluten, gluten has different damaging effects in each individual. To say it is worse or not as bad - well, it's hard to quantify. Would you rather have D and/or C with cramps, or gluten ataxia and brain fog, or have it silently attack some other part of your body like your thyroid? Or suddenly end up with lymphoma? You will never know until it shows up what damage it is doing. And it doesn't matter if you have a diagnosis or not, if you are sensitive to it it is harming you.
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Neroli


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#4 rockectman

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:44 AM

Thanks for the replies. Love this board, really helps me.
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#5 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 10:49 AM

Soy SAUCE is not always gluten free. Some of it is made with wheat (check the label, it has to be disclosed in the US). Soy ALONE does not have gluten in it. However many do react to soy in various ways. I did a poll asking how many people here also avoid soy and the variety of reasons for avoiding it was wide. Some people might have an allergy, some might get the same symptoms from it as they get from glutening, some avoid it because they also have thyroid issues.
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#6 rockectman

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 12:56 PM

Soy SAUCE is not always gluten free. Some of it is made with wheat (check the label, it has to be disclosed in the US). Soy ALONE does not have gluten in it. However many do react to soy in various ways. I did a poll asking how many people here also avoid soy and the variety of reasons for avoiding it was wide. Some people might have an allergy, some might get the same symptoms from it as they get from glutening, some avoid it because they also have thyroid issues.

thanks......soy sauce kills me just like a big mac would. found san j organic tamari sauce, good substitute.
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#7 chasbari

 
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Posted 20 December 2010 - 01:04 PM

Soy is an individual thing, Derrick. There do seem to be a lot of us who do not tolerate it, but gluten and soy sensitivities do not go hand in hand. Some people think it's bad for everyone because of its hormonal effect but soy is generally considered to be a safe edible.

It is my understanding that, technically, soy has never been granted official GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status by the FDA. I will have to track down my source on that, though. Maybe Weston Price.. Price Pottinger.. Maybe Mercola.. Can't find it at present.
CS
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#8 Skylark

 
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Posted 24 December 2010 - 11:24 AM

It is my understanding that, technically, soy has never been granted official GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status by the FDA. I will have to track down my source on that, though. Maybe Weston Price.. Price Pottinger.. Maybe Mercola.. Can't find it at present.
CS

A little common sense, please. The GRAS lists are for additives and flavorings, not for whole foods that are obviously edible. I doubt carrots or chicken have been granted official GRAS status either. Anyone trying to invoke lack of GRAS status for a whole food like soy has an axe to grind and if that's the best argument they can come up with, they're in sad shape.
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#9 chasbari

 
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Posted 24 December 2010 - 12:25 PM

A little common sense, please. The GRAS lists are for additives and flavorings, not for whole foods that are obviously edible. I doubt carrots or chicken have been granted official GRAS status either. Anyone trying to invoke lack of GRAS status for a whole food like soy has an axe to grind and if that's the best argument they can come up with, they're in sad shape.


I consider myself educated now. Thank you. It is just something that stuck in the back of my mind from my early ventures into understanding gluten-free and all my other problems. One of those statements that, contextually, can be made without fibbing in order to put forth an agenda but isn't really true either. I guess that would mean I don't have GRAS status either.. thank heavens! (I will have to tell my wife I am dangerous now.)
CS
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