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Betty Crocker Mixes, Bisquick And Udi's
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A while back I remember a few posts about Udi's making some really sick and then also that BC Devil's Food and now the Biscquick do the same thing. The conjecture was that it is cause by a significantly large amount of Xanthum Gum in these mixes to make them have the texture they do (GOOD, Hold-together texture).

I had been eating BC Devil's food for months when suddenly I ate a piece of cake and 20 minutes later was on the side of the road wretching with horrific stomach cramps and pain - the pain and wretching went away afer about an hour, but then got nasty "big D".....

I thought it was the eggs (maybe old?).....so I bought brand new eggs and made another cake. Same thing. So I thought the butter might be bad and tried again with new butter. Same thing. So I stopped eating BC mixes. Then I read about the same thing with Udi's and the Bisquick. I tried the Udi's and lo and behold I got sick from that. My S-I-L just made me a huge amount of coffee cakes and cookies with the gluten-free Bisquick and I'm afraid to eat them since I'm away from home at their house on the opposite coast from where I live.

The only thing in common these products have does seem to be a large amount of Xanthum Gum, which I understand is not tolerated well at large amounts.

Does anyone know anything about this, have the same experience. I think I'm going to stop eating "substitute foods, made to be like glutened foods" (Quinoa pasta makes me sick too - also has Xanthum Gum). But I'm embarrassed to just throw all this stuff out since my S-I-L just made these for me on a very tight budget@

HELP!

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Someone in another thread mentioned that Betty Crocker has recently changed the formula of the gluten-free brownies to add soy to the mix. Now she no longer can eat the brownies. I am wondering if maybe you may have a soy sensitivity and maybe that contributed to the reaction you had? I am not sure if soy is in the products you mentioned but you might want to see. You did eat these products before without getting sick? If so, then it must be a new ingredient added or a new sensitivity you recently developed...

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Udi's makes me violently ill but these other products I handle with no issue. It's a confusing process sometimes :(

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Udi's makes me violently ill but these other products I handle with no issue. It's a confusing process sometimes :(

I have no problem with the Udi's sandwich bread - but yesterday, I tried their bagels - and that did make me feel pretty terrible.

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Take the bake goods graciously, put them in the freezer. Figure out if your food sensitivity is the eggs or xanthan gum. A person that takes the time to make gluten free food will have the understanding that are trying to figure out what is making you sick now.

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You can review all the ingredients of the foods and look for common items. Soy is probably in most or all of the tings you listed.

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The Udi's bread says soy free. The Bisquick does not list soy as an ingredient but lists a "may contain soy" disclaimer.

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I have no problem with any of the products named here. I have no known allergies or food sensitivities other than gluten.

richard

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I have no problem with any of the products named here. I have no known allergies or food sensitivities other than gluten.

richard

I tolerate these products fine as well. I'm sorry they don't agree with you.

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I tolerate these products fine as well. I'm sorry they don't agree with you.

Quite right there is no soy but some of the ingredients are Xanthan Gum, Tapioca Starch, Corn Syrup, Eggs and ascorbic acid :(

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All these products are a no-no for me because of the potato starch (and the soy), but if potatoes and soy are not a problem for you then....????

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I am very fortunate in that I react only to gluten. I use all of the listed products with no problem. Notice that these products are gluten free only; they do not pretend to have no ingredients that someone might be sensitive to. Just figure out which ones bother you and avoid those.

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Thanks Everyone for your input!!

I have no known sensitivities to any of the mentioned ingredients (nor the ones common to these products). I eat soy all the time in other things and by itself (gluten-free soy sauce, soy milk), tapioca starch products, many many dairy products all the time, eggs at least twice weekly (scrambled, etc). I've been gluten-free since 2005 and never had this problem with anything other than gluten before.

However, I did read somewhere (wish I could remember where) that BC and Udi's both use quite a lot of Xanthum Gum to get the great texture. And that same place mentioned that some people become sensitive to large amounts of Xanthum Gum (also Carageenan and Guar, but especially Xanthum). If that's what's bothering me, then that may now be a sensitivity for good and I'll have to watch baked goods that may have a lot of Xanthum Gum. I can't get Udi's very easily, so I won't miss that brand - but the BC mixes and Bisquick will be missed!

I may do some more research on Xanthum Gum and post any siginificant findings here.

Thank goodness it's not soy or I'd really be in trouble! I feel a lot of sympathy for people who are sensitive to multiple common ingredients like soy, eggs, dairly, potatoes, etc.

Again thanks everyone for the input - greatly appreciated.

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Thanks Everyone for your input!!

I have no known sensitivities to any of the mentioned ingredients (nor the ones common to these products). I eat soy all the time in other things and by itself (gluten-free soy sauce, soy milk), tapioca starch products, many many dairy products all the time, eggs at least twice weekly (scrambled, etc). I've been gluten-free since 2005 and never had this problem with anything other than gluten before.

However, I did read somewhere (wish I could remember where) that BC and Udi's both use quite a lot of Xanthum Gum to get the great texture. And that same place mentioned that some people become sensitive to large amounts of Xanthum Gum (also Carageenan and Guar, but especially Xanthum). If that's what's bothering me, then that may now be a sensitivity for good and I'll have to watch baked goods that may have a lot of Xanthum Gum. I can't get Udi's very easily, so I won't miss that brand - but the BC mixes and Bisquick will be missed!

I may do some more research on Xanthum Gum and post any siginificant findings here.

Thank goodness it's not soy or I'd really be in trouble! I feel a lot of sympathy for people who are sensitive to multiple common ingredients like soy, eggs, dairly, potatoes, etc.

Again thanks everyone for the input - greatly appreciated.

I think these sensitivies in many of us are temporary due to the inflamation that has been caused. Hopefully with healing, these sensitivities will subside. I know I never had any problems with any foods until my very first flare up. Before that, I thought all was well - the only thing I ever had a problem with was too much cafeine - hoping my body at some point goes back to the way it was. Funny, I do great with the Udi Bread - even though I cannot eat cooked rice or potatoes. When it is configured differently (as in a flour) I am fine :)

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well, if it is xanthan gum you can test that theory. Get some xantham gum and use it in a recipe. Then do the same recipe without the xanthan gum. It doesn't have to be something baked. You could put some xanthan gum in a soup for instance and check your reactions. Xanthan gum is kind of expensive so maybe you could borrow a few tablespoons from a nearby celiac group.

Merry Christmas and I hope you figure it out! :D :D :D

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I found that over time I got more sensitive to trace cc and had to eliminate more processed foods. If you are eating a lot of other processed foods without issues that probably isn't it. I thought I'd mention it just in case.

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If you start reacting to other gluten-free products, too, you might want to consider that you are becoming more sensitive to gluten. That happened to me, my daughter, my son, my brother, AND my father, to different extents.

All of those products you listed have too much gluten for both me and my daughter, although my father and brother can have them just fine.

However, if you find out you are reacting to the xanthan gum? You might want to keep an eye on some of the other gums, too. I have read that a number of people who react to one, start having trouble with the others (arabic gum, guar gum, that sort).

Good luck discovering what exactly has been making you ill!

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