Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Whole Family With Celiac?
0

12 posts in this topic

Our 16-yr-old son was diagnosed with celiac disease in March 2010. His only symptoms were short stature and delayed puberty. Since going "mostly" gluten-free in March, he has grown over 4 inches and is now getting deeper voice and facial hair. The rest of us (mom, dad, brother, sister) all had blood testing done shortly after to check tTG and IgA -- all within normal ranges.

Since we are away from home, I have had extra time to dive into the the web and read, read, read. Wow!! I'm totally convinced that I need to insist on further testing for all of us. I have a laundry list of symptoms, not to mention a mother who had her thyroid removed (presumed cancerous, determined not) and a father who had late onset diabetes and later melanoma. My husband has had digestive issues for years, mainly having to go to the bathroom within minutes of eating a meal -- every meal. His mother had diabetes as well. Our other son has stomach cramping, migraines, general "I don't feel well" almost daily, as well as "soft" teeth. Our daughter had distended abdomen as toddler, and still does to some extent.

My question is whether it's at all feasible that every member of a family could have Celiac. As a sidenote, I believe my husband is of Irish descent, and we both have Cherokee in our lineage. Is it possible for all of us to have celiac disease?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Celiac Disease is genetic so, yes, it's possible.

Ethnicity doesn't really play into it. Celiac can be found everywhere. It's not a disease that particularly cares about your nationality. :)

And even if you test negative, you might find that you and your family has a positive dietary response.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I attend conferences throughout the U.S., I'm always surprised at the number of couples where both the husband and wife have celiac--but they didn't know it at the time they got married. At one particular conference, I learned of a study out of Italy that showed that the facial bones of people with celiac can be different because they don't "set" at the proper time but, instead, keep growing into one's 20s. Since that time, I've studied the faces of people who attend celiac conferences and have seen a strong pattern where the cheekbones, jaws, and chins are quite prominent. These bones also curve differently than most people's, and I've come to recognize people who probably have celiac just by looking at them. At the last large conference I attended, I was mistaken for other people repeatedly because, as it turned out, I strongly resembled three other women in attendance. All the people in my family who have these facial features do, indeed, have celiac. Since these features are viewed by most people as attractive and because men and women tend to be attracted to people whose faces mirror their own, it's no wonder that so many men and women with celiac are attracted to each other....and sometimes marry.

So, the answer to your question is, yes, it is quite possible that your husband and you BOTH have celiac. Meal preparation should become much easier for your family, since you'll all be on the same diet.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it is quite possible. It is also possible to have false negatives on both blood and biopsy so when you are done with all testing do give the diet a good strict try for the whole family.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rosetapper, do you know where I could read that paper you were talking about?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I have a friend that has 4 children. Three are confirmed celiac one is the identical twin of one of the confirmed kids, so she has a high chance of being celiac (I think its 70% chance)

That paper about facial features sounds fascinating! Any chance of the link?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac Disease is genetic so, yes, it's possible.

Ethnicity doesn't really play into it. Celiac can be found everywhere. It's not a disease that particularly cares about your nationality. :)

And even if you test negative, you might find that you and your family has a positive dietary response.

I totally agree that this condition doesn't play favorites! I'm totally amazed and intrigued by all the stories and how varied they are! My mom has done some extensive research on the Cherokee, and found that they have a high incidence of wheat intolerance. I know how important it is to devulge as much info as possible to docs when trying to get to the bottom of a mystery illness, and thought it may or may not be pertinent. I love all the responses -- thank you!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my immediate family, my youngest son(6) and myself are celiac. Husband won't get tested despite some family history of possible risk factors. He figures my youngest son just got it from me so he couldn't possibly have it. Both my children were screened after I was diagnosed and both were negative and did not exibit any symptoms. Youngest was having varing symtoms so started back with the allergist and was retested for celiac in Nov. and was positive. Oldest son was also rescreened and is negative. So hubby and oldest son(almost 10) are not gluten free. I think my father may have it as well as my brother. Dad got screened a few yrs ago but I think he had a false negative (actually he don't know what his results were just that the dr. said you don't have it) and my brother refuses to get tested because I think deep down he knows he has it and is in denial. I also have two third cousins that have celiac and and uncle who I'm suspicious of.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, the study was sent to me as a PDF after the conference, not a link, but it was entitled, "Large Forehead: A Novel Sign of Undiagnosed Coeliac Disease" and the paper was written by Finizio, Quaremba, Mazzaccca, and Ciacci. Interestingly, the Italian study showed that Italians with celiac tend to have larger, wider foreheads. The celiacs that I observed in the United States had large jaws, cheekbones, and chins.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, the study was sent to me as a PDF after the conference, not a link, but it was entitled, "Large Forehead: A Novel Sign of Undiagnosed Coeliac Disease" and the paper was written by Finizio, Quaremba, Mazzaccca, and Ciacci. Interestingly, the Italian study showed that Italians with celiac tend to have larger, wider foreheads. The celiacs that I observed in the United States had large jaws, cheekbones, and chins.

thanks!! Here it is? Not sure if we are allowed to post links? Sorry if we aren't

http://www.labmeeting.com/paper/26285831/finizio-2005-large-forehead-a-novel-sign-of-undiagnosed-coeliac-disease

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that is the story! Thanks for posting it! Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to include the photographs of the patients that show the points of the face that were used and how the differences appeared, but if you contact me, I'll send you the PDF.

At the conferences, I've taken numerous photos of people who represent the type of face I see over and over again among celiacs. Some are almost caricatures--specific facial features are so emphasized. At one conference, I was certain that a young lady and a young man were brother and sister because their facial features were so unique (exaggerated curving of the cheekbones, jawbones, and chins), but they weren't related at all! If you look at the photos of posters on this forum, you'll see these unique characteristics in a number of them--look for square (but curved) jaws, prominent cheekbones, and chins that are pronounced and slightly curved forward. I call this look "crescent face" because in 3/4 view, they resemble the cartoon image of a 3/4 moon face that is smiling--the foreheads are flat, the nose area also appears a bit flatter than normal because the cheekbones are so pronounced, and then the large curved jaws and chins are quite noticeable. Luckily, these features are considered desirable in our culture--I strongly suspect that a number of actors have celiac, since their prominent features make them attractive to audiences. If you think about it, a number of famous people who have celiac are considered quite good looking.

At the last celiac conference I attended, I noticed that even the African-American celiac attendees had the very same exaggerated facial characteristics I've described above. I mentioned my hypothesis to a number of people I know (we are members of the same nationwide celiac organization), and they began to observe people's facial characteristics, too. They were amazed at the similarities in most people's faces and discussed this issue with much excitement throughout the conference.

Besides being repeatedly mistaken for other people at these conferences, I've also had the experience of believing that I've met certain people before because they looked "familiar." Likewise, numerous people would approach me and say that they're certain they've met me before when there was actually no chance of that happening. I think that our similar features make us appear familiar. At regular, non-celiac events when I've spotted someone with what I consider to be celiac facial features, it is uncanny how many times that person will rush up to me--a total stranger--and exclaim that he/she knows me from somewhere. They always insist that they've met me before....when probably I just seem familiar because I may resemble some of their celiac relatives or friends with celiac--or even them. Lastly, it is interesting how attractive I find men with celiac--they're just a good-looking lot (now don't let this go to your heads!). Again, I believe this is because of the "mirroring" aspects of our faces. So...if you've had that love-at-first-sight experience and the person turned out to have celiac, there's a possible explanation for it.

By the way, I can't figure out how to post my photo on this site--I think the size of my photos is too large (??). Anyway, if I could figure out how to do it, I could post my photo and those of my grown children, and you would easily see what I mean by "crescent face."

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that is the story! Thanks for posting it! Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to include the photographs of the patients that show the points of the face that were used and how the differences appeared, but if you contact me, I'll send you the PDF.

At the conferences, I've taken numerous photos of people who represent the type of face I see over and over again among celiacs. Some are almost caricatures--specific facial features are so emphasized. At one conference, I was certain that a young lady and a young man were brother and sister because their facial features were so unique (exaggerated curving of the cheekbones, jawbones, and chins), but they weren't related at all! If you look at the photos of posters on this forum, you'll see these unique characteristics in a number of them--look for square (but curved) jaws, prominent cheekbones, and chins that are pronounced and slightly curved forward. I call this look "crescent face" because in 3/4 view, they resemble the cartoon image of a 3/4 moon face that is smiling--the foreheads are flat, the nose area also appears a bit flatter than normal because the cheekbones are so pronounced, and then the large curved jaws and chins are quite noticeable. Luckily, these features are considered desirable in our culture--I strongly suspect that a number of actors have celiac, since their prominent features make them attractive to audiences. If you think about it, a number of famous people who have celiac are considered quite good looking.

At the last celiac conference I attended, I noticed that even the African-American celiac attendees had the very same exaggerated facial characteristics I've described above. I mentioned my hypothesis to a number of people I know (we are members of the same nationwide celiac organization), and they began to observe people's facial characteristics, too. They were amazed at the similarities in most people's faces and discussed this issue with much excitement throughout the conference.

Besides being repeatedly mistaken for other people at these conferences, I've also had the experience of believing that I've met certain people before because they looked "familiar." Likewise, numerous people would approach me and say that they're certain they've met me before when there was actually no chance of that happening. I think that our similar features make us appear familiar. At regular, non-celiac events when I've spotted someone with what I consider to be celiac facial features, it is uncanny how many times that person will rush up to me--a total stranger--and exclaim that he/she knows me from somewhere. They always insist that they've met me before....when probably I just seem familiar because I may resemble some of their celiac relatives or friends with celiac--or even them. Lastly, it is interesting how attractive I find men with celiac--they're just a good-looking lot (now don't let this go to your heads!). Again, I believe this is because of the "mirroring" aspects of our faces. So...if you've had that love-at-first-sight experience and the person turned out to have celiac, there's a possible explanation for it.

By the way, I can't figure out how to post my photo on this site--I think the size of my photos is too large (??). Anyway, if I could figure out how to do it, I could post my photo and those of my grown children, and you would easily see what I mean by "crescent face."

That's really interesting. One thing I have noticed in myself and my children is that on gluten many times one eye will appear smaller than the other. When not under the gluten influence both eyes are the same size. I have noticed this in others also who are thinking they might need the diet because of symptoms. I wonder if that might be another characteristic.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      103,880
    • Total Posts
      919,458
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Celiac - How many symptoms can there be?
      As you doubtless know now, there are so many ways celiac can present, here's as big a list as I could find online. It would probably be quicker to list what isn't a factor For me personally, nausua, check, left sided back hip pain (my laymans theory here is that celiac is affecting the sciatic nerve which runs from lower back down leg) , check, chest pain also - but for me this comes in short bursts more I guess like heartburn - I thought I was having heart attacks... Check to the rest too... And, for what its worth, other things like being prone to bronchial infection oh hell yes.  I'm currently in the glutened / affected by something group myself so I can only share the advice I've been given. Start a food diary and see if you can track down anything diet related that may be affecting you. Eat as clean as you can, ease up on alcohol, just try and give yourself the best chance of recovery. Have a google of 'heal my gut' diet tips too, you're in the recovery phase at the moment. All the best, at least there's comfort in knowing you're not alone!   Matt  
    • Depression / anxiety issues
      Thanks for the advice Matt, I will be sure to take it all onboard. It's really good to talk to others that have had similar experiences. I'm currently upping my b12 and also taking a additional (gluten free) multi and b complex, also omega 3s and Vitiam D3. I had been noticing small improvements that I forgot to mention in my previous post. I noticed that I fall asleep now much easier than before going gluten-free, I also have moments where my body feels more calm, then blood in my stool has stopped I haven't had any in 10 weeks. My mind was constantly fixated on negative thoughts for the past 2 years and they slowly began lifting from all day negative thoughts to maybe half a day of negative thoughts if that makes sense, but this pass week and a half they have come back, I'm also finding my self very nervous again around other people I'm hoping this will pass. The anxiety / depression is the worst symptom for me I would not wish it on my worst enemy, if that went away I would be the happiest man in the world. I found it very hard to talk to people about my mental health issues at work before I lost my job as I found some people stigmatise me and don't understand or really care, but I figure i don't need narrow minded people like that anyway, and as a man its hard to open up but my wife is very supportive and encouraging. Thanks again for the advice really apricate it
    • Depression / anxiety issues
      G'day Chris and welcome to the forum. You have found what I think is the single best resource on the web for advice, support and understanding for this condition. There is so much info here it's difficult to know where to start, but that's what this thread is for, please check it out. I think I got the recommendation for 'Real life with Celiac Disease' by Dennis and Leffler there, I'll second that, there's a lot of very useful info in there which helps to answer a lot of your questions. May be useful for your partner also. Chapters are short and informative so you can dip in and out.  There will doubtless be more advice to come from others with more experience but there's a few things which occur. Firstly, 10 weeks is very early days. Your body has been under an assault for many, many years. Your immune system has been working overtime and like so many others you've only reached diagnosis after reaching a crisis point. You are now healing but it won't be instant and it won't be without ups and downs, speedier and slower phases.  Second, being strict on gluten is essential, but it's only one part of the puzzle. You also need to eat really healthily and try to heal your gut. As you remove gluten you may find that your body starts telling you that other foods are also an issue. Don't panic, it doesn't mean that will always be the case. But you need to approach the next 6 months as a period where you're giving your body the easiest ride possible. That may mean taking probiotics, bone broths or it could also mean avoiding dairy or other foods, at least until your body has had a chance to heal. If you think you may still be getting gluteny effects keeping a food diary, noting what you eat, when and how you feel would help to track down any further issues.  I too battled through the anxiety, had an all too brief moment of bliss as the diet kicked in, then faced a bumpier recovery period in the weeks that followed. It gets easier but it's still difficult for me from time to time. I tried to articulate some of this recently here, it's a long read but maybe some of it will strike a chord. It will get better and you will become better equipped to deal with it. If you're like me you'll find other things getting better over time that you would never have thought to connect to gluten. Now, I've been exceedlingly nice here and not mentioned the England Rugby drubbing but I can feel my self control beginning to slip. So I'll leave it there   Matt
    • Depression / anxiety issues
      Thanks for the advice Irene. I will look into that book. I know I'm a long away from healed but I got my hopes up when I felt better in that first week, it's just constantly a battle. I am hoping and praying that I get better soon 
    • Celiac - How many symptoms can there be?
      Do you take digestive enzymes and probiotics? That may help. Have you met with a dietician for help figuring out how you're getting glutened?
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • Jmg  »  admin

      Hello Admin!
      I don't know whether this is of interest to post on your articles feed:
      http://pratt.duke.edu/about/news/window-guts-brain
      Kind Regards,
      Matt
      · 2 replies
    • celiac sharon  »  cyclinglady

      Hello cycling lady, have you noticed my picture is showing up as you?  Have no idea why but it's rather disconcerting to see my picture and your words 😉  Do you know how to fix it?  You seem to have far more experience with this board than I do
      · 1 reply
    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Here is the link if you have never watched it.
      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      60,925
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    tr2v12
    Joined