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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

What If I Ignore It?
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What would happen if I just continue to eat the way I do? Or if I dont totally remove gluten from my diet? Feeling like more & more of my life is now being majorly restricted is enough to make me crack. Is there a step process that I can follow? My doctor said to just evaluate what I eat & leave it out or make substitutions but are there any steps to get into this new lifestyle? Help...

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Well if you ignore your diagnosis you could end up with a signature like mine or worse. Ignoring it increases your chances of developing cancer and could rob you of your brain. I was a long time to diagnosis and could barely walk or talk by the time I was diagnosed to say nothing of the daily agony of the constant D.

The gluten free lifestyle does take some getting used to. If you start with whole unprocessed foods it is easier. Even if your not an accomplished cook many things are really easy to make like chili and stews and soups. It is not hard to throw a piece of chicken in the oven along with a baked potato or a steak or burger on the stove with a salad or some veggies.

I do know how hard it is at first but in the long run you and your loved ones will be happy you stuck to it. Since this disease can also effect our mental health ignoring risks you a awful lot. We are here to help in any way we can.

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

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If you enjoy being sick and getting sicker sure just keep eating gluten.

Really it's not that hard to eliminate from your diet? Why stress out about it, do it and you'll feel better. If you really don't know much about food, diet, ingredients of food, what contains gluten or not and your totally lost, contact a nutritionist or dietician or some one along those lines familiar with Celiac. If you don't want to do that, keep reading as much as you can and inform yourself calm down and do it. Every thing you need for a better gluten free lifestyle is a search away....

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If you enjoy being sick and getting sicker sure just keep eating gluten.

Really it's not that hard to eliminate from your diet? Why stress out about it, do it and you'll feel better. If you really don't know much about food, diet, ingredients of food, what contains gluten or not and your totally lost, contact a nutritionist or dietician or some one along those lines familiar with Celiac. If you don't want to do that, keep reading as much as you can and inform yourself calm down and do it. Every thing you need for a better gluten free lifestyle is a search away....

Did seeing a dietician work for you? Being diabetic was easy cause carbs are required to be listed on all food labels but gluten is not listed. So did talking to the dietician really help you get a good idea of what is good & what is bad?

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

Yes sensitivity varies huge from person to person. It's not the immediate effects of being glutened that are a major concern if you are not that sensitive, it's the long term negative effects on your body, it's BAD for you! It does not have to cost any more. No you do not have to consume gluten to correct low blood sugar.

Knowledge is key, read read read inform your self. Or as I stated earlier seek the advice of professionals if your over whelmed. Good Luck- it's not really that big of a deal on becoming educated on your new diet and you'll be healthier.

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.

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Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.

I like this! A great way to sum it up, I feel. I recently replied to a woman who claimed that her husband and young son are celiac, but if they happen to eat "just a little" they don't have any problems with it. So she feels they have a minor case of celiac. She truly believes since they are not symptomatic, there is no reason to be careful, especially with cross contamination. She equates the absence of serious symptoms to the level, or degree, of the disease. "Since they don't get real sick with a little gluten, I don't really worry about it"

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

If you are celiac, you risk other autoimmune diseases and intestinal cancer if you continue to consume gluten, no matter whether you notice it or not. If you are gluten-intolerant, the risks of consuming gluten are less well known, but it's still not a good plan.

Gluten-free does not have to be expensive. If you have money problems, make rice, beans, potatoes, and corn your staples. Add cheeses, veggies and meats as you find them on sale.

PM Peter, one of the moderators. He is type 1 diabetic and celiac and can explain how to correct a severe low blood sugar without ever consuming gluten. After all, it's sugar you need, not gluten.

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Did seeing a dietician work for you? Being diabetic was easy cause carbs are required to be listed on all food labels but gluten is not listed. So did talking to the dietician really help you get a good idea of what is good & what is bad?

I did not see one. I have always been very aware and knowledgable of what I eat from a health side of things. When I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease I spent a a solid month almost day and night searching and learning every thing I could from the WWW and bought a few books, and magazines. I still continuously read about it. I'll admit I was already on a rather low carb diet and eliminating gluten for me was not a very dramatic thing. My health improved almost the day I stopped eating gluten, I'm quite happy not eating things that make me feel bad. I also love to cook and I'm a total 'foody.' There is nothing I really miss form my strict Celiac Diet.

The leaky roof analogy above is a so on point. Black mould - Cancer or other nasty health issues.

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PM Peter, one of the moderators. He is type 1 diabetic and celiac and can explain how to correct a severe low blood sugar without ever consuming gluten. After all, it's sugar you need, not gluten.

She did, and I have sent her a brief reply.

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Hi, Bean, and welcome!

I have been a type one diabetic for almost my entire life, and was diagnosed, completely out of the blue, with celiac disease five years ago. I was asymptomatic -- a "silent' celiac, if you will. So it was extremely difficult to justify the introduction of another hugely restrictive diet upon myself, on top of all the restrictions of the diabetic diet. Hey, there's no pain, no diarrhea, no migraines nor joint pain.. . . ....why DO this to myself??

Well, I started reading. A lot of my research brought me back here to c.com, a fantastic source of information and support. I realized that I had to give up ALL gluten. 'Twas difficult with no horrific symptoms to keep me away from it, but the alternative is very possible intestinal cancer and other autoimmune diseases. Once I knew this, it got easier.

Here is another vital thing: the diabetic diet and the gluten-free diet combine very, very well. We diabetics need to restrict carbs, and gluten is found in grains.. . .... ...carbohydrates. So we are already partway there. My blood sugars have been tightly controlled for many years, but my AICs have been the best in my life since going gluten-free. Eliminating this protein from your diet can tighten your blood sugars up, no question.

There is quite a learning curve at first with the gluten-free diet, but it really does become second nature. And insulin reactions don't ever have to involve gluten - - I always carry glucose tablets with me, and at home I have fruit and/or honey.

There are quite a few diabetic celiacs on this forum. You're far from alone, and we're here to help! :)

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She did, and I have sent her a brief reply.

Great! I'm so glad you two connected. I didn't want to say something wrong about diabetes. Fortunately I haven't needed to manage that particular health condition.

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Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.

That was one of the most helpful, honest, & easy to understand things I've heard thus far & it really helped. I wish my doctor was as gifted with words. Thank you soo much!

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Hi, Bean, and welcome!

I have been a type one diabetic for almost my entire life, and was diagnosed, completely out of the blue, with celiac disease five years ago. I was asymptomatic -- a "silent' celiac, if you will. So it was extremely difficult to justify the introduction of another hugely restrictive diet upon myself, on top of all the restrictions of the diabetic diet. Hey, there's no pain, no diarrhea, no migraines nor joint pain.. . . ....why DO this to myself??

Well, I started reading. A lot of my research brought me back here to c.com, a fantastic source of information and support. I realized that I had to give up ALL gluten. 'Twas difficult with no horrific symptoms to keep me away from it, but the alternative is very possible intestinal cancer and other autoimmune diseases. Once I knew this, it got easier.

Here is another vital thing: the diabetic diet and the gluten-free diet combine very, very well. We diabetics need to restrict carbs, and gluten is found in grains.. . .... ...carbohydrates. So we are already partway there. My blood sugars have been tightly controlled for many years, but my AICs have been the best in my life since going gluten-free. Eliminating this protein from your diet can tighten your blood sugars up, no question.

There is quite a learning curve at first with the gluten-free diet, but it really does become second nature. And insulin reactions don't ever have to involve gluten - - I always carry glucose tablets with me, and at home I have fruit and/or honey.

There are quite a few diabetic celiacs on this forum. You're far from alone, and we're here to help! :)

Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

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Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

Why a long slow road? It's your choice but here is a list: (Research and or get help don't eat these things be healthy!) http://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsafe-Gluten-Free-Food-List-Unsafe-Ingredients/Page1.html

Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)

Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)

Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Atta Flour

Barley Grass (can contain seeds)

Barley Hordeum vulgare

Barley Malt

Beer (most contain barley or wheat)

Bleached Flour

Bran

bread Flour

Brewer's Yeast

Brown Flour

Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)

Bulgur Wheat

Cereal Binding

Chilton

Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)

Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

cookie Crumbs

Cookie Dough

Cookie Dough Pieces

Couscous

Criped Rice

Dinkle (Spelt)

Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate

Durum wheat (Triticum durum)

Edible Coatings

Edible Films

Edible Starch

Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)

Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)

Enriched Bleached Flour

Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour

Enriched Flour

Farina

Farina Graham

Farro

Filler

Flour (normally this is wheat)

Fu (dried wheat gluten)

Germ

Graham Flour

Granary Flour

Groats (barley, wheat)

Hard Wheat

Heeng

Hing

Hordeum Vulgare Extract

Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol

Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch

Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Kamut (pasta wheat)

Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce)

Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce)

Kluski Pasta

Maida (Indian wheat flour)

Malt

Malted Barley Flour

Malted Milk

Malt Extract

Malt Syrup

Malt Flavoring

Malt Vinegar

Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Matza

Matzah

Matzo

Matzo Semolina

Meringue

Meripro 711

Mir

Nishasta

Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)

Orzo Pasta

Pasta

Pearl Barley

Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)

Perungayam

Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)

Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)

Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)

Roux

Rusk

Rye

Seitan

Semolina

Semolina Triticum

Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Small Spelt

Spirits (Specific Types)

Spelt (Triticum spelta)

Sprouted Wheat or Barley

Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Strong Flour

Suet in Packets

Tabbouleh

Tabouli

Teriyaki Sauce

Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)

Triticale X triticosecale

Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids

Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract

Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil

Udon (wheat noodles)

Unbleached Flour

Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Vital Wheat Gluten

Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum

Wheat amino acids

Wheat Bran Extract

Wheat, Bulgur

Wheat Durum Triticum

Wheat Germ Extract

Wheat Germ Glycerides

Wheat Germ Oil

Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)

Wheat Nuts

Wheat Protein

Wheat Triticum aestivum

Wheat Triticum Monococcum

Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract

Whole-meal Flour

Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)

Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:

Artificial Color4

baking powder4

Caramel Color1, 3

Caramel Flavoring1, 3

Clarifying Agents4

Coloring4

Dextrins1,7

Dextrimaltose1,7

Dry Roasted Nuts4

Emulsifiers4

enzymes4

Fat Replacer4

Flavoring6

food Starch1, 4

Food Starch Modified1, 4

Glucose Syrup4

Gravy Cubes4

Ground Spices4

HPP4

HVP4

Hydrolyzed Plant Protein4

Hydrolyzed Protein4

Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein4

Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate4

Hydroxypropylated Starch4

Maltose4

Miso4

Mixed Tocopherols4

Modified Food Starch1, 4

Modified Starch1, 4

Natural Flavoring6

Natural Flavors6

Natural Juices4

Non-dairy Creamer4

Pregelatinized Starch4

Protein Hydrolysates4

Seafood Analogs4

Seasonings4

Sirimi4

Smoke Flavoring4

Soba Noodles4

Soy Sauce4

Soy Sauce Solids4

Sphingolipids4

Stabilizers4

Starch1, 4

Stock Cubes4

Suet4

Tocopherols4

Vegetable Broth4

Vegetable Gum4

Vegetable Protein4

Vegetable Starch4

vitamins4

Wheat Starch5

1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free.

3) The problem with caramel color is it may or may not contain gluten depending on how it is manufactured. In the USA caramel color must conform with the FDA standard of identity from 21CFR CH.1. This statute says: the color additive caramel is the dark-brown liquid or solid material resulting from the carefully controlled heat treatment of the following food-grade carbohydrates: Dextrose (corn sugar), invert sugar, lactose (milk sugar), malt syrup (usually from barley malt), molasses (from cane), starch hydrolysates and fractions thereof (can include wheat), sucrose (cane or beet). Also, acids, alkalis and salts are listed as additives which may be employed to assist the caramelization process.

4) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.

5) Most celiac organizations in the USA and Canada do not believe that wheat starch is safe for celiacs. In Europe, however, Codex Alimentarius Quality wheat starch is considered acceptable in the celiac diet by most doctors and celiac organizations. This is a higher quality of wheat starch than is generally available in the USA or Canada.

6) According to 21 C.F.R. S 101,22(a)(3): [t]he terns natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof. Whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional.

7) Dextrin is an incompletely hydrolyzed starch. It is prepared by dry heating corn, waxy maize, waxy milo, potato, arrowroot, WHEAT, rice, tapioca, or sago starches, or by dry heating the starches after: (1) Treatment with safe and suitable alkalis, acids, or pH control agents and (2) drying the acid or alkali treated starch. (1) Therefore, unless you know the source, you must avoid dextrin.

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Jen, I sent you a reply in our conversation.

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Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

But so well worth the effort :D

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I'm so glad you stopped in for the support. I don't post or read very often, but my co-workers were toasting bread and I needed some moral support, even though my brain knows that eating regular bread will make me nauseous within a very short time and uncomfortable in the longer term. I am really sensitive and react very quickly to gluten...that has been a huge help for me.

But despite that I resonated with your post. Changing eating habits is really hard, especially when the effects of the way you eat are not immediately evident. And even for those of us that do have the immediate effects, there is a mourning period. The best piece I read about mourning and celiac was in the Gluten Free Bible. Awesome chapter on paying attention to those feelings.

But, as everyone says, the long term consequences are frightening if you keep eating gluten. I was diagnosed rather quickly (within 2 years of onset of symptoms), and I saw the effects of eliminating gluten within a month. But I now can remember one of my great-aunts who sort of withered away. The tale was that she just laid down and waited to die. But my family now tells me she wasn't supposed to eat wheat, and I think she'd had a lifetime of asymptomatic celiac disease. That is not the future I want to see myself in.

Keep coming back and looking for cooking resources. Modifying recipes in cookbooks can be really fun, and I'm learning how to be really positively assertive when I plan to eat out. As for snacks...when I get glutened, I get bouts of hypoglycemia. I'm not diabetic, though. Having roasted peanuts (if you can eat them), or trailmix (making it yourself is fun), is always helpful during those times.

Peace!

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P.S. Always plan for longer in grocery shopping and bring a small magnifying glass (I have one I got for free that's actually plastic). Manufacturers are required to list wheat, but you are right that they don't list the other things and it is always good to read the label.

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I so agree with spinsterwitch. The mourning section in The Gluten Free Bible made me cry buckets and helped so much with the loss of old favorite foods.

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Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

You can concentrate on meat and veggies instead of carbs and have a good gluten-free diet. Meat proteins are slow to digest and provide long lasting energy for your body vs carbs. Think of the Mediterannean diet or the paleo diet as guides. A lot of people with celiac follow the SCD (specific carbohydrate) diet or a version of it.

But basically keep away from processed foods in boxes etc and make your own foods from whole ingredients. Remove or limit the grains. You can learn and get used to it just like you learn anything else. A whole foods diet also gets you away from preservatives and food colorings etc.

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You can concentrate on meat and veggies instead of carbs and have a good gluten-free diet. Meat proteins are slow to digest and provide long lasting energy for your body vs carbs. Think of the Mediterannean diet or the paleo diet as guides. A lot of people with celiac follow the SCD (specific carbohydrate) diet or a version of it.

But basically keep away from processed foods in boxes etc and make your own foods from whole ingredients. Remove or limit the grains. You can learn and get used to it just like you learn anything else. A whole foods diet also gets you away from preservatives and food colorings etc.

I have major issues with quick drops in my sugar levels & am also working on raising money for a diabetic service dog for help with my lows so I am always needing to keep my sugar as stable as possible & need to be able to get it up quickly & keep it up. Does that make sense?

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I remember the early days after diagnosis and the emotions that went with the diagnosis. I'll admit it isn't easy at first and I did the same thing you did and tried to bargain with myself and my diet. Visiting this website and reseaching journal articles educated me and gave me the resiliance to be strict about the diet. It was a slow journey for me and I consider myself still to be healing, but it has been so worth it to have my health back. When people tell me that my diet must be so hard, I tell them it is easier than being sick and I really do mean it.

As far as the expense of a gluten-free diet:

1) With some creativity, you can manage a very healthy diet that is still low cost and high in taste. Check out the recipe forum on this website.

2) I spend about 50% of what I used to spend at the doctor's and pharmacists because I'm healthier now.

3) I'm able to work again and not have constant sick days from migraines, constant colds, and overwhelming fatigue.

4) I never ate out before going gluten-free, but lots of people save money by getting rid of that restaraunt/takeout expense.

Between returning to work full time and saving on medical expenses I've more than offset the expenses of my optional indulgences in gluten-free cakes and cookies. I've also been able to accomplish a handful of life goals that celiac had stolen from me.

Best wishes on your transition to gluten-free and keep checking in for support.

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I have major issues with quick drops in my sugar levels & am also working on raising money for a diabetic service dog for help with my lows so I am always needing to keep my sugar as stable as possible & need to be able to get it up quickly & keep it up. Does that make sense?

Have you tried some fruit or a piece of candy followed by a protein like a nut butter? Gluten foods aren't the only way to raise you levels quickly. Also once you heal a bit on the diet that in itself may help with the BS regulation. Has your doctor referred you to a diabetes educator? They can sometimes be helpful. Also if you are on a med talk to your doctor about your difficulty with control, you may need a different med or an adjustment in your dosage.

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      Hi again Richie, A lot of coeliacs have a problem with coffee, maybe you do too. It could explain the shakes you describe. I am sensitive to coffee, and haven't touched caffeine since last summer. (The detox lasted for 10 days and it wasn't pleasant, so if you ever give it up, do it gradually).  Sometimes when you're intolerant to something, when you have it, it makes you feel 'better' but it doesn't last and usually end up worse, it's like a drug - and in the case of caffeine it is. I also take a daily probiotic (gluten free and dairy free etc)., which is good for healing the gut.
    • Weird Reaction
      Cristiana and Flowerqueen, I haven't been officially diagnosed as Celiac but I had a DNA test in March 2015 which revealed I had the Celiac gene on both sides so it was advised that I have a test to see if I did have it. I didn't but I went off gluten immediately and haven't "knowingly" eaten it since. Before the DNA test I didn't have the nausea and trembling type feelings that I do now but I occasionally got the shortness of breath which I used to put down to being a smoker. (I quit almost 16 years ago) Anyway, this morning I woke with the nausea feeling, the trembling, loss of appetite, feeling of doom again but it happens so intermittently. I do have some unavoidable stress in my life all of a sudden so maybe it's all connected some how. But on the plus side my bowel movements have returned to normal and I go often especially after waking and having coffee. (Oh, and Cristiana don't worry about tmi with me. You would have to try pretty hard to offend me and nobody has done it yet. haha) I always think the worse to. The internet and Google are great but information overload becomes a real possibility creating some frightening scenarios. It's just interesting that the coffee with the MCT Oil (Brain Octane is the actual name) and butter makes me start feeling better and the nausea, trembling, anxiety seem to be extinguished by it but coffee with low fat milk doesn't although I do get more energy from it. I did read somewhere that MCT Oil was good for gut health though and if I had to describe it it would be like it just smooths over all the bad stuff with a nice soft lining.  It was recommended in my DNA test that I have more fats in my diet and low processed foods but I occasionally have gluten-free biscuits, gluten-free ice-cream (my true weakness) and gluten-free weet-bix. I've checked most of these items ingredients and they are pretty good. There is a lot of gluten free rubbish out there though which I completely avoid. Thanks GFinDC for your reply. I was going to speak to my Naturopath when I see her about Immune Health. My plan usually involves the Liver Tonic I mentioned above and heavy on the L-Glutamine which, apparently, is supposed to be excellent for gastrointestinal health but I'm not going to supplement with anything just yet until I get my blood work done and see if it reveals any deficiencies. I'm suspecting Iron though. Because I've had recent tests all coming back good I'm thinking a possible scenario would be a die-off effect I've heard of where all the bad bacteria have been killed off but your body can't rid itself of them quick enough so you actually feel or get worse before you get better. That's where the detox strategy comes in and I'm assuming replacing them with Good Bacteria via Probiotics. Again, this is what I have read in the past but it does seem to make sense in some cases. I do feel better in having found these forums though.  
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      Hi Peaceflower, Just wanted to say thank you for the chat.
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