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What If I Ignore It?


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29 replies to this topic

#1 Booseebean

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:46 AM

What would happen if I just continue to eat the way I do? Or if I dont totally remove gluten from my diet? Feeling like more & more of my life is now being majorly restricted is enough to make me crack. Is there a step process that I can follow? My doctor said to just evaluate what I eat & leave it out or make substitutions but are there any steps to get into this new lifestyle? Help...
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Jen

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#2 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:59 AM

Well if you ignore your diagnosis you could end up with a signature like mine or worse. Ignoring it increases your chances of developing cancer and could rob you of your brain. I was a long time to diagnosis and could barely walk or talk by the time I was diagnosed to say nothing of the daily agony of the constant D.
The gluten free lifestyle does take some getting used to. If you start with whole unprocessed foods it is easier. Even if your not an accomplished cook many things are really easy to make like chili and stews and soups. It is not hard to throw a piece of chicken in the oven along with a baked potato or a steak or burger on the stove with a salad or some veggies.
I do know how hard it is at first but in the long run you and your loved ones will be happy you stuck to it. Since this disease can also effect our mental health ignoring risks you a awful lot. We are here to help in any way we can.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 Booseebean

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 11:24 AM

Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.
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Jen

#4 meatslayer

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 11:32 AM

If you enjoy being sick and getting sicker sure just keep eating gluten.

Really it's not that hard to eliminate from your diet? Why stress out about it, do it and you'll feel better. If you really don't know much about food, diet, ingredients of food, what contains gluten or not and your totally lost, contact a nutritionist or dietician or some one along those lines familiar with Celiac. If you don't want to do that, keep reading as much as you can and inform yourself calm down and do it. Every thing you need for a better gluten free lifestyle is a search away....
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#5 Booseebean

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 11:39 AM

If you enjoy being sick and getting sicker sure just keep eating gluten.

Really it's not that hard to eliminate from your diet? Why stress out about it, do it and you'll feel better. If you really don't know much about food, diet, ingredients of food, what contains gluten or not and your totally lost, contact a nutritionist or dietician or some one along those lines familiar with Celiac. If you don't want to do that, keep reading as much as you can and inform yourself calm down and do it. Every thing you need for a better gluten free lifestyle is a search away....

Did seeing a dietician work for you? Being diabetic was easy cause carbs are required to be listed on all food labels but gluten is not listed. So did talking to the dietician really help you get a good idea of what is good & what is bad?
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Jen

#6 meatslayer

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 11:42 AM

Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.


Yes sensitivity varies huge from person to person. It's not the immediate effects of being glutened that are a major concern if you are not that sensitive, it's the long term negative effects on your body, it's BAD for you! It does not have to cost any more. No you do not have to consume gluten to correct low blood sugar.

Knowledge is key, read read read inform your self. Or as I stated earlier seek the advice of professionals if your over whelmed. Good Luck- it's not really that big of a deal on becoming educated on your new diet and you'll be healthier.
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#7 kareng

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 12:01 PM

Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.


Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.
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#8 beefree11

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 12:27 PM

Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.


I like this! A great way to sum it up, I feel. I recently replied to a woman who claimed that her husband and young son are celiac, but if they happen to eat "just a little" they don't have any problems with it. So she feels they have a minor case of celiac. She truly believes since they are not symptomatic, there is no reason to be careful, especially with cross contamination. She equates the absence of serious symptoms to the level, or degree, of the disease. "Since they don't get real sick with a little gluten, I don't really worry about it"
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"Have patience with all things, but chiefly have patience with yourself. Do not lose courage in considering your own imperfections but instantly set about remedying them -- every day begin the task anew."

Saint Francis de Sales

#9 Skylark

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 12:32 PM

Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

If you are celiac, you risk other autoimmune diseases and intestinal cancer if you continue to consume gluten, no matter whether you notice it or not. If you are gluten-intolerant, the risks of consuming gluten are less well known, but it's still not a good plan.

Gluten-free does not have to be expensive. If you have money problems, make rice, beans, potatoes, and corn your staples. Add cheeses, veggies and meats as you find them on sale.

PM Peter, one of the moderators. He is type 1 diabetic and celiac and can explain how to correct a severe low blood sugar without ever consuming gluten. After all, it's sugar you need, not gluten.
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#10 meatslayer

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 01:07 PM

Did seeing a dietician work for you? Being diabetic was easy cause carbs are required to be listed on all food labels but gluten is not listed. So did talking to the dietician really help you get a good idea of what is good & what is bad?


I did not see one. I have always been very aware and knowledgable of what I eat from a health side of things. When I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease I spent a a solid month almost day and night searching and learning every thing I could from the WWW and bought a few books, and magazines. I still continuously read about it. I'll admit I was already on a rather low carb diet and eliminating gluten for me was not a very dramatic thing. My health improved almost the day I stopped eating gluten, I'm quite happy not eating things that make me feel bad. I also love to cook and I'm a total 'foody.' There is nothing I really miss form my strict Celiac Diet.

The leaky roof analogy above is a so on point. Black mould - Cancer or other nasty health issues.
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#11 psawyer

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 03:15 PM

PM Peter, one of the moderators. He is type 1 diabetic and celiac and can explain how to correct a severe low blood sugar without ever consuming gluten. After all, it's sugar you need, not gluten.

She did, and I have sent her a brief reply.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#12 elye

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 04:40 PM

Hi, Bean, and welcome!

I have been a type one diabetic for almost my entire life, and was diagnosed, completely out of the blue, with celiac disease five years ago. I was asymptomatic -- a "silent' celiac, if you will. So it was extremely difficult to justify the introduction of another hugely restrictive diet upon myself, on top of all the restrictions of the diabetic diet. Hey, there's no pain, no diarrhea, no migraines nor joint pain.. . . ....why DO this to myself??

Well, I started reading. A lot of my research brought me back here to c.com, a fantastic source of information and support. I realized that I had to give up ALL gluten. 'Twas difficult with no horrific symptoms to keep me away from it, but the alternative is very possible intestinal cancer and other autoimmune diseases. Once I knew this, it got easier.

Here is another vital thing: the diabetic diet and the gluten-free diet combine very, very well. We diabetics need to restrict carbs, and gluten is found in grains.. . .... ...carbohydrates. So we are already partway there. My blood sugars have been tightly controlled for many years, but my AICs have been the best in my life since going gluten-free. Eliminating this protein from your diet can tighten your blood sugars up, no question.

There is quite a learning curve at first with the gluten-free diet, but it really does become second nature. And insulin reactions don't ever have to involve gluten - - I always carry glucose tablets with me, and at home I have fruit and/or honey.

There are quite a few diabetic celiacs on this forum. You're far from alone, and we're here to help! :)
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Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973
diagnosed celiac winter 2005
diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! Posted Image


11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.
--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

#13 Skylark

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 05:45 PM

She did, and I have sent her a brief reply.

Great! I'm so glad you two connected. I didn't want to say something wrong about diabetes. Fortunately I haven't needed to manage that particular health condition.
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#14 Booseebean

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 05:51 PM

Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.


That was one of the most helpful, honest, & easy to understand things I've heard thus far & it really helped. I wish my doctor was as gifted with words. Thank you soo much!
  • 0
Jen

#15 Booseebean

 
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Posted 18 January 2011 - 05:57 PM

Hi, Bean, and welcome!

I have been a type one diabetic for almost my entire life, and was diagnosed, completely out of the blue, with celiac disease five years ago. I was asymptomatic -- a "silent' celiac, if you will. So it was extremely difficult to justify the introduction of another hugely restrictive diet upon myself, on top of all the restrictions of the diabetic diet. Hey, there's no pain, no diarrhea, no migraines nor joint pain.. . . ....why DO this to myself??

Well, I started reading. A lot of my research brought me back here to c.com, a fantastic source of information and support. I realized that I had to give up ALL gluten. 'Twas difficult with no horrific symptoms to keep me away from it, but the alternative is very possible intestinal cancer and other autoimmune diseases. Once I knew this, it got easier.

Here is another vital thing: the diabetic diet and the gluten-free diet combine very, very well. We diabetics need to restrict carbs, and gluten is found in grains.. . .... ...carbohydrates. So we are already partway there. My blood sugars have been tightly controlled for many years, but my AICs have been the best in my life since going gluten-free. Eliminating this protein from your diet can tighten your blood sugars up, no question.

There is quite a learning curve at first with the gluten-free diet, but it really does become second nature. And insulin reactions don't ever have to involve gluten - - I always carry glucose tablets with me, and at home I have fruit and/or honey.

There are quite a few diabetic celiacs on this forum. You're far from alone, and we're here to help! :)


Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.
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Jen




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