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Need Help With Bread Making
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I posted to another topic "Bread Machine Experiences". Just learning how to use this website. Sorry. My problem is, I just bought a Breadman. I used Bobs Red Mill Recipe for Walrus Bread on the Brown Rice Flour Package. In the recipe it said to mix all the dry ingrediants in a bowl. Then to mix your wet ingredients together separately and then add that mixture to your dry. I wasn't sure if I should stir it, but I did a little anyway. So I did that right, I'm pretty sure. On my bread machine, I set it to White Bread as instructed on the recipe, not gluten free. Then I set it on the right loaf size and on Light crust. I wasn't sure about

the light crust. The recipe said to set the machine on Lite. But there was no such selection. The Bread kneaded and rose, then baked and when it was done I took it out immediately as said to do in my Breadman book. I flipped it over and after about 10 minutes I sliced off an end. It looked great and I was please with my self as I never have good luck with the first time I bake anything. So I turned it over to check it out and noticed oooze under the top crust witch looked weird.

sure enough, the middle was gooey. so I cut and scraped and now I have a bread bowl. I can tell this is going to be an adventure. Should I have left the crust setting on medium, or checked it first with a knife and set it on bake for 10 more minutes or so, or should I have used the gluten free setting? I would appreciate any input. Frustrated in Vancouver :)

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I tried to make my own bread the other day and it tastes great with the flour mixture I made up but it didn't rise... I'll try again some day..

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"And now I have a bread bowl." :lol:

I haven't tried using a bread machine since I started baking gluten free, but I can see that you are quickly figuring out that each machine and each recipe needs to be tinkered with, or "customized."

In general, it's always a good idea to test something with a knife stuck in it, to see if it comes out clean, before declaring something "done." Then it can be baked longer, either inside the pan, or if you are trying to crisp the crust, outside the pan. The other good idea is keeping notes and jotting down what sort of thing happened with each recipe. You can vary something like the baking pan and have the baking time vary tremendously, I did that just yesterday morning and had to increase the baking time quite a bit. I was doing a microwave bread and used a smaller bowl. It wouldn't finish, and I had to keep adding 10 - 20 second increments and retesting, which in a microwave is like going for 5 to 10 minute oven equivalents.

In general, gluten free does better at slightly lower baking temperatures, for a longer period of time than conventional baking. Some gluten free substitutes, like nut meals, will tend to burn at higher temps and yet not get done in the middle at regular baking intervals, if you are adapting a recipe.

So if everything else was okay, maybe add some time, at least 10 minutes and maybe 15 or 20, if you got a gooey center, first.

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I don't have a bread machine but I do use an instant-read thermometer to check the doneness of the breads I bake in my oven. I also find that for me at least, baking at a slightly lower temperature works better as gluten-free breads tend to come out very crusty (tenting them with aluminum foil after baking for awhile is suggested with some recipes, too.) Some time ago I printed out the recipe for Walrus Bread...I should try it using the conventional method (not bread machine).

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I don't have a bread machine but I do use an instant-read thermometer to check the doneness of the breads I bake in my oven. I also find that for me at least, baking at a slightly lower temperature works better as gluten-free breads tend to come out very crusty (tenting them with aluminum foil after baking for awhile is suggested with some recipes, too.) Some time ago I printed out the recipe for Walrus Bread...I should try it using the conventional method (not bread machine).

Thank you Sylvia, I was wondering where do you get an instant read thermometer? The walrus bread is good. I like the texture and flavor. But I think I would add a little more stevia next time. I was also diagnosed recently and by blood panel. I have been suffering after meals for years and conventional doctors never could figure out what was wrong with me. I started going to a naturepath doctor and she didn't take long to figure it out. I am also pre-diabetic and lactose intolerant. It has been interesting. I am learning more every day. Much Gratitude for your post!

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"And now I have a bread bowl." :lol:

I haven't tried using a bread machine since I started baking gluten free, but I can see that you are quickly figuring out that each machine and each recipe needs to be tinkered with, or "customized."

In general, it's always a good idea to test something with a knife stuck in it, to see if it comes out clean, before declaring something "done." Then it can be baked longer, either inside the pan, or if you are trying to crisp the crust, outside the pan. The other good idea is keeping notes and jotting down what sort of thing happened with each recipe. You can vary something like the baking pan and have the baking time vary tremendously, I did that just yesterday morning and had to increase the baking time quite a bit. I was doing a microwave bread and used a smaller bowl. It wouldn't finish, and I had to keep adding 10 - 20 second increments and retesting, which in a microwave is like going for 5 to 10 minute oven equivalents.

In general, gluten free does better at slightly lower baking temperatures, for a longer period of time than conventional baking. Some gluten free substitutes, like nut meals, will tend to burn at higher temps and yet not get done in the middle at regular baking intervals, if you are adapting a recipe.

So if everything else was okay, maybe add some time, at least 10 minutes and maybe 15 or 20, if you got a gooey center, first.

Thank you for your input. I will try all of your suggestions.

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Thank you Sylvia, I was wondering where do you get an instant read thermometer? The walrus bread is good. I like the texture and flavor. But I think I would add a little more stevia next time. I was also diagnosed recently and by blood panel. I have been suffering after meals for years and conventional doctors never could figure out what was wrong with me. I started going to a naturepath doctor and she didn't take long to figure it out. I am also pre-diabetic and lactose intolerant. It has been interesting. I am learning more every day. Much Gratitude for your post!

I actually bought my instant read digital thermometer at Lowe's...in the grilling section (brand is Taylor and it was about $15). It has never seen use at my grill but it works well for testing the temp of both the liquid I use for bread as well as the baked bread. I think you should be able to find one in lots of stores, possibly even discount stores and certainly any kitchen store. I'm sure you can get one for less $$$ than that.

I never did get to try the walrus bread yet..it's still on my "to do" list. I think you'll find baking bread to be one of the most challenging things about being gluten-free. And I've baked some bricks! Some went straight into the garbage. But I'm getting better at it. :D Wish I could be of more help but I don't have a bread machine. I debated between it and a KitchenAid stand mixer and the mixer won.

My poor son-in-law in Denver is struggling to make pizza crust (my daughter is celiac) and I baked this bread again, which I've made before, and suggested he try it for pizza crust since it has a nice crispy crust. French Bread It's definitely delicious although not as nutritious as your walrus bread. I don't know how it would translate to use it with a bread machine though.

Good luck with your bread making and your gluten-free diet! And if you find a "knock-your-socks-off" gluten-free bread recipe, please share it with those of us who are on a never-ending quest for the "perfect" bread. :D

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