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Wheat Allergy And Grain Alcohol


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22 replies to this topic

#16 order

 
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Posted 01 May 2013 - 01:10 AM

I'm not a celiac, but I have a wheat allergy. I just discovered it 4 days ago, and it's very high. I've been researching, and here's another list of products with vodkas and a few alcohols listed from the grain type and the distilled type

 

http://foodallergies...ies/f/vodka.htm

 

I was wondering what other drinks are wheat free??


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#17 wheatfree13

 
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Posted 23 May 2014 - 07:29 AM

Wheat is gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat. So if it's gluten-free, it's by default wheat-free.

Celiacs may not be "allergic" to wheat in the traditional sense but we still can't touch it either.

 

Hey I think you have this backwards and just want to clarify so make sure other people don't get confused and cause harm. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, yes. But that does not mean wheat is gluten - there is no logic in that. People who are allergic to wheat have an allergic reaction to the entire wheat itself. Typically food allergies are a response to a protein found in that food, so if you test positive for a wheat allergy but not celiac disease you are probably reacting to a different protein found in wheat (this is the case for me). People who are allergic to the gluten protein are allergic to the gluten protein. 

 

I'm not sure what you mean by the traditional sense of an allergy, but I know that alcohols can be distilled to the point where gluten is present in such a small amount that it is considered gluten free. This does not say much to any other proteins in wheat that others may be allergic to, so I would make sure to double check. The gluten protein may be gone, distilled, removed, or what have you, but that does not necssarily mean it is safe to consume if you have a wheat allergy.

Bottom line, wheat does not equal gluten.


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#18 wheatfree13

 
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Posted 23 May 2014 - 07:33 AM

All gluten free products are wheat free, but not all wheat free products are gluten free. As vodka is gluten free, it is therefore wheat free.

 

This is backwards too - gluten is found IN wheat, so if a product is wheat free where would the gluten be coming from? It doesn't make sense for a wheat-free product to have gluten in it, because the wheat holds the gluten protein. If a product is gluten free, the gluten protein may have been distilled or removed, but it could still be wheat free.


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#19 GF Lover

 
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Posted 23 May 2014 - 07:40 AM

Gluten is found not only in wheat but also in barley and rye.  Might this be the confusion?

 

Colleen


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#20 wheatfree13

 
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Posted 23 May 2014 - 07:43 AM

Gluten is found not only in wheat but also in barley and rye.  Might this be the confusion?

 

Colleen

 

That can definitely confuse people. Like I was trying to say, gluten is a protein and it is not just wheat. Celiacs need to stay away from wheat, barley, rye, and anything else containing gluten. People with wheat allergies need to focus on staying away from wheat. I just want to stress that understanding what you are allergic to is important because consuming the wrong things can have negative affects on your body that you may not be able to see. It never hurts to see a dietician or allergist (or both!)


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#21 kareng

 
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Posted 23 May 2014 - 07:53 AM

I am not sure what you don't understand about these 3 year old posts. Something can be labelled "wheat free" but still contain gluten. Most commonly, I have seen " wheat free" bread that is not gluten-free because it contains barley. If something is labelled gluten-free, it must be wheat free, barley free, rye free.

People with Celiac are not necessarily allergic to wheat. A few might be but Celiac is not an allergy.
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#22 LauraTX

 
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Posted 23 May 2014 - 07:56 AM

This is backwards too - gluten is found IN wheat, so if a product is wheat free where would the gluten be coming from? It doesn't make sense for a wheat-free product to have gluten in it, because the wheat holds the gluten protein. If a product is gluten free, the gluten protein may have been distilled or removed, but it could still be wheat free.

 

 

That can definitely confuse people. Like I was trying to say, gluten is a protein and it is not just wheat. Celiacs need to stay away from wheat, barley, rye, and anything else containing gluten. People with wheat allergies need to focus on staying away from wheat. I just want to stress that understanding what you are allergic to is important because consuming the wrong things can have negative affects on your body that you may not be able to see. It never hurts to see a dietician or allergist (or both!)

 

 

These are pretty clearly contradictory statements, I assume you just worded wrong since you now have voiced understanding of what is correct.  Celiac disease does not function as an allergy to gluten, the biological mechanics work completely different and it is actually an autoimmune disease.

 

Obviously, a bona fide wheat allergy that acts as a classic food allergy is very serious, and some slightly different precautions may have to be made.  I shortly met one person who has a wheat allergy when I was shopping in a gluten-free food section and talked to her a bit.  Didn't get specifics on what she eats, but we talked about which gluten-free products were good and not good, and she told me she just eats gluten-free so she can know for sure there is no wheat in there.  Each person needs to do what is best for them, but remember the Celiac patients here on the forum are only experts on their own dietary needs.


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#23 Greebo115

 
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Posted 23 May 2014 - 12:21 PM

I am not sure what you don't understand about these 3 year old posts. Something can be labelled "wheat free" but still contain gluten. Most commonly, I have seen " wheat free" bread that is not gluten-free because it contains barley. If something is labelled gluten-free, it must be wheat free, barley free, rye free.

People with Celiac are not necessarily allergic to wheat. A few might be but Celiac is not an allergy.

 

Sorry if I seem pedantic, but I need to point out something, in case someone who has a wheat allergy reads these posts.

 

Just because a product is gluten free, doesn't mean is wheat free. There is a substance called "codex wheat starch" (widely used in Europe, I don't know about elsewhere) which is being used more and more in gluten free foods.

Here is a description of codex wheat starch:

 

https://www.coeliac....x-wheat-starch/

 

Here is a product example:

http://www.glutafin....x-wheat-starch/

 

I have a major problem with wheat and I made the mistake in thinking that if something was gluten free it was definitely wheat free - this is not so.


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Obvious symptoms started as a baby with gastroenteritis....
Self - diagnosed celiac at age 41 - Gluten-free since December 2012, shortly after realised in needed to avoid:
Dairy, soy, all grains, all pseudo-grains, nightshades, legumes, MSG, xantham gum, all sugar alcohols.
Low sugar/refined carbs since Aug '08 due to reactive hypoglycemia.

22/03/13 Mung beans and blackeyebeans reintroduced successfully!

26/06/13 Some symptoms mysteriously returned - found loads of CC in my nuts and dried beans!! (verified by food/symptom journal and emails to companies)

26/11/13 After 2 weeks on crutches (again) realised that legumes cause my joints to inflame - it's undeniable....legumes gone!





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