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Help With Grain Free Baking


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#1 SGWhiskers

 
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Posted 26 January 2011 - 02:34 PM

I have a friend who has been on a Paleo diet for over a year due to celiac and RA. Every time she tries one of her son's gluten-free treats, she gets gets GI problems (not as bad as a glutening though).

We've been putting our heads together about what might be safer to try reintoducing next time and I thought I would come to you guys for suggestions. She has serum tested positive for walnut and milk allergies, but eats other nuts without problems and includes a little dairy in her diet without GI complaints.

What ingredients are grain free flours that could be used for baking or for thickening. Do you have any basic recipies for her to try once she recovers from her son's gluten free cupcake?
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#2 ElseB

 
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Posted 26 January 2011 - 06:10 PM

Two words for you: Almond Flour! Here's my two favourite almond flour recipes that the gluten eaters in my life even love (sometimes I think they love these cakes more than I do!!!)

CLEMENTINE CAKE

4-5 clementines
6 eggs
1 cup sugar
2 1/3 cup ground almonds
1 tsp baking powder

Put the clementines in a pan with some cold water, bring to the boil and cook for 2 hours. Drain and, when cool, cut each clementine in half and remove the pips. Dump the clementines - skins, pith, fruit and all - and give a quick blitz in a food processor (or by hand, of course). Preheat the oven to 375 F. Butter and line a 9 inch Springform tin.

You can then add all the other ingredients to the food processor and mix. Or, you can beat the eggs by hand adding the sugar, almonds and baking powder, mixing well, then finally adding the pulped oranges.

Pour the cake mixture into the prepared tin and bake for an hour, when a skewer will come out clean; you'll probably have to cover with foil or greaseproof after about 40 minutes to stop the top burning. Remove from the oven and leave to cool, on a rack, but in the tin. When the cake's cold, you can take it out of the tin. I think this is better a day after it's made, but I don't complain about eating it at any time.


CARROT CAKE

It’s important to grate the carrots on the fine holes of your grater, or else they’ll remain too crunchy. For best results, wrap the cake tightly in plastic after it cools and serve it the next day. It will keep for five days in the refrigerator if wrapped airtight.

1 1/2 cups (1/2 pound) unsalted toasted almonds
1/4 cup raw brown (turbinado) sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
4 large eggs
1/3 cup organic white sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups finely grated carrots (about 10 ounces)

1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees with a rack in the middle. Oil a 9-inch springform pan, and line it with parchment. Lightly oil the parchment.
2. Combine the almonds and the turbinado sugar in a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Blend until the almonds are finely ground. Add the baking powder, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and lemon zest, and pulse together.
3. Beat the eggs until thick in the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, or with an electric beater. Add the organic sugar, and continue to beat until the mixture is thick and forms a ribbon when lifted from the bowl with a spatula. Beat in the vanilla. Add the almond mixture and the carrots in three alternating additions, and slowly beat or fold in each time.
4. Scrape the batter into the prepared cake pan. Place in the oven, and bake one hour until firm to the touch and beginning to pull away from the pan. A toothpick inserted into the center of the cake should come out clean. Remove from the heat, and allow to cool on a rack for 10 minutes. Run a knife around the edges of the pan, and carefully remove the spring form ring. Allow the cake to cool completely, then wrap tightly in plastic.
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#3 missy'smom

 
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Posted 27 January 2011 - 10:29 AM

I am also dairy-free, due to a casein allergy but I can tolerate goat's milk products. Anyway, all my offerings are low-carb. For the almond flour, this supplier has a dedicated gluten-free facility. http://lucyskitchenshop.com/flour.html

Here are some recipes that I've tried:
http://lowcarbdiets....eflaxmuffin.htm
http://lowcarbdiets....laxbasicfoc.htm

Here are some recipes/sites that I haven't tried:
http://comfybelly.com/2009/01/waffles/
http://www.elanaspan...g/almond-flour/
http://dreamaboutfoo...w-carb-and.html

Coconut flour is another baking option. I haven't tried it. Including the words low-carb in a search may help.
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Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11
Son: ADHD '06,
neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07
ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08
ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08
Gluten-free-Feb. '09
other food allergies

#4 DanaPete

 
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Posted 27 January 2011 - 10:49 AM

How about Garbanzo or Tapioca Flours. I'm sure there is more. I'm just learning too. So I really don't have any examples to share except for bread. And I didn't have a reaction to these flours. Good luck :)
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#5 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 27 January 2011 - 09:42 PM

I only use Almond Flour and Coconut Flour.
Love them both and will never go back to grain.

I do have a slice of Udi's bread once in a great while.

The Almond Flour Cookbook by Elana Amsterdam is wonderful.

Made a chocolate cake from that and thought I was in heaven.

She also has a website if you want to try her recipes.

She uses both coconut flour and almond flour in her recipes.

I love her stuff. Very good and simple.
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Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.
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#6 precious831

 
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Posted 15 February 2011 - 03:37 PM

How about Garbanzo or Tapioca Flours. I'm sure there is more. I'm just learning too. So I really don't have any examples to share except for bread. And I didn't have a reaction to these flours. Good luck :)


Sorry, garbanzo and tapioca flours are not paleo-approved.
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Grain-free,dairy-free, soy-free (celiac, possible colitis now as well).
Extremely allergic to shellfish, Aspirin & Ibuprofen

#7 precious831

 
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Posted 15 February 2011 - 03:39 PM

I'm paleo and also have celiac disease. You can use nut flours. Peanut is not a nut, it's a legume so I believe it's not paleo-approved(I'll have to check again). You can use almond, pecan, hazelnuts, chestnuts, any nut. I usually buy them raw, soak and dehydrate. To make it easy for you, you might just get almond flour.

Also sugar is not paleo approved.
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Grain-free,dairy-free, soy-free (celiac, possible colitis now as well).
Extremely allergic to shellfish, Aspirin & Ibuprofen




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