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Almost Cried At Work!


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#1 Kimbalou

 
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Posted 11 February 2011 - 09:31 AM

So, yesterday at work somebody brought in cupcakes and cookies...of course they weren't gluten-free. I had just gone to the gluten-free bakery and ate a cupcake of my own, but I was still very upset watching all my co-workers eat regular food right in front of me. We have a little group meeting before we start work and as soon as everyone saw the goodies, they grabbed them like they were starving..lol...and I just stood there ready to cry. So, I opened my big mouth and said "Well, next time I'll have to bring my gluten-free deserts to share." Someone said "oh, why?" Then I said "because I have Celiac disease and I almost want to cry watching you guys eat." Someone said "OH! Really?" and that was about it. Then I felt a little stupid for saying anything. I was thinking about asking the manager not to allow people to eat like that at our little meetings before we start working, but I decided I was way too sensitive and we don't need any more "RULES!"
Ugh, just wanted to share my self-pity story. Do you think I was out of line?
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11/19/10 diagnosed with Celiac disease after positive blood test
12/14/10 Biopsy positive for Celiac disease

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#2 Monklady123

 
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Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:01 AM

So, yesterday at work somebody brought in cupcakes and cookies...of course they weren't gluten-free. I had just gone to the gluten-free bakery and ate a cupcake of my own, but I was still very upset watching all my co-workers eat regular food right in front of me. We have a little group meeting before we start work and as soon as everyone saw the goodies, they grabbed them like they were starving..lol...and I just stood there ready to cry. So, I opened my big mouth and said "Well, next time I'll have to bring my gluten-free deserts to share." Someone said "oh, why?" Then I said "because I have Celiac disease and I almost want to cry watching you guys eat." Someone said "OH! Really?" and that was about it. Then I felt a little stupid for saying anything. I was thinking about asking the manager not to allow people to eat like that at our little meetings before we start working, but I decided I was way too sensitive and we don't need any more "RULES!"
Ugh, just wanted to share my self-pity story. Do you think I was out of line?


Yes, probably it would be out of line to ask the manager not to allow others to eat what they want near you. But -- NOT "out of line" to feel that way! I went to a dinner meeting a few weeks ago to a pizza/sandwich place and the only thing I could eat there was a salad. :( I like salads, but it was hard to watch them all eating pizza and gooey melted cheese sandwiches.

It's hard. After awhile it gets easier, I guess. I mean, it has gotten easier for me. This was a church meeting so the next time we were going out for one (we like to support the businesses around our church) I suggested a different place, a Salvadorian restaurant with lots of corn things.

But yeah, it's hard.
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#3 Haylsinator

 
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Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:06 AM

I think it would be out of line to say anything to the manager - I don't think people should have to not enjoy food just because I can't. Not that I don't really want to have them all try it sometime! That would be so great :D People would have such a new respect for us.

Your feelings were definitely spot on. We're having a potluck at work today and I can eat a soup that someone made and the muddy buddy I made. The soup would not have been gluten free if the woman who made it wasn't so thoughtful. She went out of her way to find gluten-free ingredients for it. I'm super lucky in the support I have from my team here. However, it doesn't usually extend much further than general sympathy which, I won't lie, I definitely appreciate from time to time!
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#4 Ahorsesoul

 
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Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:08 AM

You certainly were not out of line. You just were hurt that no one considered your problem. You are giving up a lot by going gluten free.

You just have to realise that because you are celiac the rest of the world does not change. How can an office work around everyone's problems with food. You hare having gluten withdrawal. Think about it: They can't serve peanut butter/chocolate because of someones allergy, no carbs or sweets because of the diabetics, have to be low fat for the people with heart problems and high blood pressure, no gluten because of the celiacs but also no dairy or soy since they bother a lot of people. So there is this plate of raw carrots. But wait raw foods might not be good either because some people have trouble digesting the raw fiber. So what, complain and management will have to ban all treats. It goes on and on.

You could ask your co-workers to let you know ahead of time if they are bringing in goodies so you can bring your own. Or keep something in your desk so you can have a treat at the same time.

Remember they are not leaving you out. You could have eaten a poisoned cupcake. You made the best choice by not eating it. Unfortunately this is one of those things celiacs just have to deal with not only at work but with family and friends. It's hard enough for an adult to deal with, I can only imagine what it is like for a child.

Remember it is not the food that is important, it is the socializing with people that should be most important. Your health is much more important then a cupcake.

When you brought in your gluten-free cupcake did you bring enough for everyone? Probably no one was upset that you had something special.
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1960s-had symptoms-could have been before but don't remember
1970s-told had colitis or nervous stomach-was given phenobarbital, felt great but still had symptoms
Me, dd and ds diagnosed with Lactose Intolerance
2000-osteopenia
2001-had stroke because of medications I was given
June 2003-saw Chiropractor who specialized in nutrition: Celiac Disease not Lactose Intolerance, went gluten free with once in awhile cheating, off soy and dairy for about 6 months
June 2003-found excellent doctor for fibromyalgia (who has found out she has Celiac Disease)
May 2006-went gluten free with NO cheating-excellent! Made all the difference in the world

#5 Kimbalou

 
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Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:16 AM

You certainly were not out of line. You just were hurt that no one considered your problem. You are giving up a lot by going gluten free.

You just have to realise that because you are celiac the rest of the world does not change. How can an office work around everyone's problems with food. You hare having gluten withdrawal. Think about it: They can't serve peanut butter/chocolate because of someones allergy, no carbs or sweets because of the diabetics, have to be low fat for the people with heart problems and high blood pressure, no gluten because of the celiacs but also no dairy or soy since they bother a lot of people. So there is this plate of raw carrots. But wait raw foods might not be good either because some people have trouble digesting the raw fiber. So what, complain and management will have to ban all treats. It goes on and on.

You could ask your co-workers to let you know ahead of time if they are bringing in goodies so you can bring your own. Or keep something in your desk so you can have a treat at the same time.

Remember they are not leaving you out. You could have eaten a poisoned cupcake. You made the best choice by not eating it. Unfortunately this is one of those things celiacs just have to deal with not only at work but with family and friends. It's hard enough for an adult to deal with, I can only imagine what it is like for a child.

Remember it is not the food that is important, it is the socializing with people that should be most important. Your health is much more important then a cupcake.

When you brought in your gluten-free cupcake did you bring enough for everyone? Probably no one was upset that you had something special.



I only bought 1 cupcake for myself because they were $2 a piece! I ate it in my car before work...lol..had a chocolate craving, so at least I had my own treat beforehand. thanks for the advice everyone.
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11/19/10 diagnosed with Celiac disease after positive blood test
12/14/10 Biopsy positive for Celiac disease

#6 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 11 February 2011 - 11:19 AM

Try and make a habit of always have some sort of gluten free treat with you if you can. Maybe on the weekends bake a batch of gluten free cupcakes and stick some in the freezer. Then bring one or two into work with you for the times that the other folks are having their gluten filled goodies. That way you won't feel as left out.
It is hard to cope with all the restriction we have at first but we need to find ways of coping that work for us. It isn't insensitive of others to eat the stuff they can eat in front of us but if we are not prepared it can be a bit depressing.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#7 Cypressmyst

 
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Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:21 PM

It helps me to know that it is poison. Not appetizing in the least.

Honestly when I see people eating or drinking gluten I feel bad for them. Especially when they have an obvious weight issue or auto-immune disorder and the like. Very hard to watch people killing themselves. :( Breaks my heart every time.
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#8 cassP

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 05:58 AM

I only bought 1 cupcake for myself because they were $2 a piece! I ate it in my car before work...lol..had a chocolate craving, so at least I had my own treat beforehand. thanks for the advice everyone.


you should bring your ONE delicious gluten-free cupcake with u to the next meeting- and eat it while the others are eating.

and- i think its gonna get easier for you- really.... a year ago- people looked at me funny when i didnt eat wheat or gluten.. but now everyone seems to be more aware of gluten intolerance because it's been in the news, and there's more products everywhere..
i brought in Pamela's Vanilla gluten-free cupcakes once- and everyone loved them!

i dont know how long you've been gluten free- but it definitely has gotten easier for me.

the part that really has pissed me off is my additional intolerances... and sometimes HYPER allergic reactions to foods that used to be okay... <_<
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1986- Elevated Speckled ANA/no Lupus.negative Sjorgens
2008- AntiGliadin IGA/IGg~ Negative,TTG IGA/IGg~ Weak Positive, Endomysial Antibody~ Positive, IGA Deficient.
no biopsy (insurance denied)
6/2010- Enterolab Gene Test:
HLA-DQB1 Allele 1 0302
HLA-DQB1 Allele 2 0302
HLADQ 3,3 (subtype 8,8)
7/2010- 100% Gluten Free
8/2010- DH
10/2010-Hypothyroid dx-> 12/2010 Hashimoto's dx + 1/11- Graves dx :(

#9 Muffy

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 08:20 AM

It helps me to know that it is poison. Not appetizing in the least.

Honestly when I see people eating or drinking gluten I feel bad for them. Especially when they have an obvious weight issue or auto-immune disorder and the like. Very hard to watch people killing themselves. :( Breaks my heart every time.



That's how feel. Yuck. And when I watch people I care about eat it I want to cry and scream, but usually I just try to educate them. And then they blow me off. :(
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...Muffy

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#10 Ahorsesoul

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 09:06 AM

I can imagine it would be the same for an alcoholic to be around people drinking or a person who is trying to quit smoking to be around or see others smoking!


Good point. I had forgotten about this point of view.
  • 0
1960s-had symptoms-could have been before but don't remember
1970s-told had colitis or nervous stomach-was given phenobarbital, felt great but still had symptoms
Me, dd and ds diagnosed with Lactose Intolerance
2000-osteopenia
2001-had stroke because of medications I was given
June 2003-saw Chiropractor who specialized in nutrition: Celiac Disease not Lactose Intolerance, went gluten free with once in awhile cheating, off soy and dairy for about 6 months
June 2003-found excellent doctor for fibromyalgia (who has found out she has Celiac Disease)
May 2006-went gluten free with NO cheating-excellent! Made all the difference in the world

#11 Heidiho

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 10:43 AM

Yes, probably it would be out of line to ask the manager not to allow others to eat what they want near you. But -- NOT "out of line" to feel that way! I went to a dinner meeting a few weeks ago to a pizza/sandwich place and the only thing I could eat there was a salad. :( I like salads, but it was hard to watch them all eating pizza and gooey melted cheese sandwiches.

It's hard. After awhile it gets easier, I guess. I mean, it has gotten easier for me. This was a church meeting so the next time we were going out for one (we like to support the businesses around our church) I suggested a different place, a Salvadorian restaurant with lots of corn things.

But yeah, it's hard.

I used to just bring my own food to parties or any gathering, people use those that have celiac a way to exclude you. As we are different but that does not mean we can't stick up for ourselves, I once went to a party with gluten free food, and everyone loved it. It is not there fault they are not educated about celiac but I have found it is sometimes easier to bring your own food. It may be hard to watch people eat the food, but remember it is saving your life.
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#12 SaraKat

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 03:11 PM

It's not weird to feel bad about it, but I would not ask the manager to not let people eat things in front of you.

Honestly, when people are eating things like that in front me I don't feel bad, I just think this is awesome- it is like a diet for me that I can't slip on! The other nigth I went out and the people I was with ordered all these chicken wings and I had carrots and celery only, imagine all the calories I saved! LOL
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#13 BeccaBol

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 03:20 PM

I had a meltdown today, cause I am so tired of being someone who can't afford to buy all the right ingredients for making yummy gluten free meals, my husband has Celiac Disease and so I want to make things good for him, and to have the same variety in meals we used to have before he was diagnosed not quite a year ago. All I want is for him to be able to enjoy eating again....and things are so stinkin expensive that ppl like us can't afford to eat the way we have to eat! Anyone else feel this way?
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#14 mushroom

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 03:50 PM

Hello and welcome to the board.

I am sorry you are finding gluten free cooking to be such an expensive and challenging experience. It really doesn't have to be that way. If you eliminate the processed foods (except for bread and pasta) and eat only whole foods, meats, vegetables, fruit, rice, you can make an endless variety of wonderful food without spending a whole bunch. If you cook in a crockpot, you can even buy the less expensive cuts of beef and chicken and when they are cooked in a crockpot they get so falling-off-the-bone tender they are scrumptious. Tell us what things you are having problems cooking gluten free and I am sure folks here will have lots of ideas for you.
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#15 kareng

 
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Posted 12 February 2011 - 03:59 PM

I had a meltdown today, cause I am so tired of being someone who can't afford to buy all the right ingredients for making yummy gluten free meals, my husband has Celiac Disease and so I want to make things good for him, and to have the same variety in meals we used to have before he was diagnosed not quite a year ago. All I want is for him to be able to enjoy eating again....and things are so stinkin expensive that ppl like us can't afford to eat the way we have to eat! Anyone else feel this way?



Since went gluten-free, my hub says we have had a lot of really good food. And we have tried a few different things. We have made things we might have gotten at a restaurant. Potato skins are cheaper & healthier at home. We don't use alot of special gluten-free foods except some bread, pasta and pizza crust.
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