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Gluten Free Toaster


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22 replies to this topic

#1 anewlife

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 01:04 PM

I am a newbie, gluten-free for a month, and have had continued problems with stomach pain and upset as well as fatique. I have been eliminating other things from my diet, dairy, soy, but have continued to not feel well. This morning I read a blog in which a woman talked about using a separate toaster for her gluten-free bread! Is this important? I have been toasting my gluten-free bread in the same toaster as my family's non gluten-free bread and thought nothing of it. Is it possible that the exposure to their crumbs is upsetting my system? Hopefully awaiting your replies........... :)
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#2 shopgirl

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 01:15 PM

It's absolutely important and, yes, it could cause symptoms. Also watch out for sharing things like butter, peanut butter, jellies, and mayo.
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"My experience has been that there is, surprisingly, always hope." - Eleven

Positive blood test & endoscopy / Gluten-free 10-07-10 / Dairy-free / Soy-free

#3 anewlife

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 01:34 PM

It's absolutely important and, yes, it could cause symptoms. Also watch out for sharing things like butter, peanut butter, jellies, and mayo.

Thanks! I have been so frustrated...even started to eliminate bread all together and it was the toaster! Is there anything else I may be overlooking. What about cutting bread for my family or making my kids sandwiches on non gluten-free bread. Could that affect me?
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#4 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 02:00 PM

Thanks! I have been so frustrated...even started to eliminate bread all together and it was the toaster! Is there anything else I may be overlooking. What about cutting bread for my family or making my kids sandwiches on non gluten-free bread. Could that affect me?

Just use a dedicated area and wash your hands after. Baking with flour could be a problem though as it can become airborne and inhaled into your system.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#5 Roda

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 02:07 PM

Make sure you have a separate colonder and new cutting boards if yours have been used for pasta and bread. You may need to replace bakeware and pots and pans that have scratches. Get new wooden spoons. Be aware of your spices/herbs, and other baking things from before gluten free.. there is a chance for cc if you double dipped like I did. I had to replace all of them due to cross contamination.
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#6 kareng

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 02:16 PM

Ditto to all of the above. I use some red duct tape to put on my butter, PB, etc. I also got red spoons and a red colander for the gluten-free stuff.
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#7 BethJ

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 11:21 AM

You can get a cheap toaster for around $10 that will work just fine. I marked mine with a big G F and put a pretty yellow shower cap over it. This prevents crumbs from the regular toaster from getting into mine.

You need to treat gluten as you would any nasty substance that can make you ill. Think of it as chicken blood or dog poop . . . you wouldn't let those things get in your food!
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Beth in Florida

Gluten-free since 7/19/08
Alcohol free since 6/28/10

#8 ElseB

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 07:20 PM

Another option is to buy toaster bags. Then you can still use the same toaster but the bag will keep your bread safe from contamination. I've never seen them in a store but you should be able to buy them online.
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#9 peacefirst

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:28 PM

I marked mine with a big G F and put a pretty yellow shower cap over it. This prevents crumbs from the regular toaster from getting into mine.

This is a great idea-I was thinking how to deal with others not using it.
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#10 peacefirst

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:29 PM

Another option is to buy toaster bags. Then you can still use the same toaster but the bag will keep your bread safe from contamination. I've never seen them in a store but you should be able to buy them online.

That would be great for vacations, but for everyday use, I would be afraid for the chemicals in those bags transfering to food.
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#11 GottaSki

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:38 PM

We evolved into a gluten-free kitchen because three out of four of us have to live gluten-free, but while we were still a combined kitchen - I replaced our 4 slice toaster with two 2 slice toasters and then covered the gluten free - first with a bright green tea towel and later with a toaster cover. Worked great in our house.

Follow everyone's suggestions above - we also had separate gluten-free cookware that was bright red like KarenG - worked very well.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#12 love2travel

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:40 PM

...and don't forget to scrub or replace your can opener! The mechanism can harbour gluten.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#13 Meatballman

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 01:21 PM

I have seperate frying pans which I use for gluten free. Also you may want to use a dedicated dish rag or sponge for yourself. May sound a bit over the top but I figure better safe than sorry. Check you tooth paste and mouth wash also.
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#14 kareng

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 02:10 PM

I have seperate frying pans which I use for gluten free. Also you may want to use a dedicated dish rag or sponge for yourself. May sound a bit over the top but I figure better safe than sorry. Check you tooth paste and mouth wash also.

I have pink or purple ones for gluten-free and the standard blue ones for gluten.

I really wanted blue cooking spoons, toaster, colander, etc but red is much easier to find. Then I use red tape on my PB, etc. And a piece of red tape on the handle to remind people that the stovetop grill is gluten-free.
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LTES

 

You better cut the pizza in four pieces, because I'm not hungry enough to eat six. ~Yogi Berra

 

smiley-eating-pizza-slice-emoticon.gif

 


#15 bartfull

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:19 PM

You need to read this thread. You will learn so much: http://www.celiac.co...ewbie-info-101/
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 



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