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Gluten Free Toaster
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I am a newbie, gluten-free for a month, and have had continued problems with stomach pain and upset as well as fatique. I have been eliminating other things from my diet, dairy, soy, but have continued to not feel well. This morning I read a blog in which a woman talked about using a separate toaster for her gluten-free bread! Is this important? I have been toasting my gluten-free bread in the same toaster as my family's non gluten-free bread and thought nothing of it. Is it possible that the exposure to their crumbs is upsetting my system? Hopefully awaiting your replies........... :)

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It's absolutely important and, yes, it could cause symptoms. Also watch out for sharing things like butter, peanut butter, jellies, and mayo.

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It's absolutely important and, yes, it could cause symptoms. Also watch out for sharing things like butter, peanut butter, jellies, and mayo.

Thanks! I have been so frustrated...even started to eliminate bread all together and it was the toaster! Is there anything else I may be overlooking. What about cutting bread for my family or making my kids sandwiches on non gluten-free bread. Could that affect me?

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Thanks! I have been so frustrated...even started to eliminate bread all together and it was the toaster! Is there anything else I may be overlooking. What about cutting bread for my family or making my kids sandwiches on non gluten-free bread. Could that affect me?

Just use a dedicated area and wash your hands after. Baking with flour could be a problem though as it can become airborne and inhaled into your system.

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Make sure you have a separate colonder and new cutting boards if yours have been used for pasta and bread. You may need to replace bakeware and pots and pans that have scratches. Get new wooden spoons. Be aware of your spices/herbs, and other baking things from before gluten free.. there is a chance for cc if you double dipped like I did. I had to replace all of them due to cross contamination.

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Ditto to all of the above. I use some red duct tape to put on my butter, PB, etc. I also got red spoons and a red colander for the gluten-free stuff.

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You can get a cheap toaster for around $10 that will work just fine. I marked mine with a big G F and put a pretty yellow shower cap over it. This prevents crumbs from the regular toaster from getting into mine.

You need to treat gluten as you would any nasty substance that can make you ill. Think of it as chicken blood or dog poop . . . you wouldn't let those things get in your food!

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Another option is to buy toaster bags. Then you can still use the same toaster but the bag will keep your bread safe from contamination. I've never seen them in a store but you should be able to buy them online.

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I marked mine with a big G F and put a pretty yellow shower cap over it. This prevents crumbs from the regular toaster from getting into mine.

This is a great idea-I was thinking how to deal with others not using it.

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Another option is to buy toaster bags. Then you can still use the same toaster but the bag will keep your bread safe from contamination. I've never seen them in a store but you should be able to buy them online.

That would be great for vacations, but for everyday use, I would be afraid for the chemicals in those bags transfering to food.

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We evolved into a gluten-free kitchen because three out of four of us have to live gluten-free, but while we were still a combined kitchen - I replaced our 4 slice toaster with two 2 slice toasters and then covered the gluten free - first with a bright green tea towel and later with a toaster cover. Worked great in our house.

Follow everyone's suggestions above - we also had separate gluten-free cookware that was bright red like KarenG - worked very well.

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...and don't forget to scrub or replace your can opener! The mechanism can harbour gluten.

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I have seperate frying pans which I use for gluten free. Also you may want to use a dedicated dish rag or sponge for yourself. May sound a bit over the top but I figure better safe than sorry. Check you tooth paste and mouth wash also.

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I have seperate frying pans which I use for gluten free. Also you may want to use a dedicated dish rag or sponge for yourself. May sound a bit over the top but I figure better safe than sorry. Check you tooth paste and mouth wash also.

I have pink or purple ones for gluten-free and the standard blue ones for gluten.

I really wanted blue cooking spoons, toaster, colander, etc but red is much easier to find. Then I use red tape on my PB, etc. And a piece of red tape on the handle to remind people that the stovetop grill is gluten-free.

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You need to read this thread. You will learn so much:

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Another option is to buy toaster bags. Then you can still use the same toaster but the bag will keep your bread safe from contamination. I've never seen them in a store but you should be able to buy them online.

It seems they are available everywhere in the UK but not in the USA.

Here's a USA news video about Tosta Bags in this example it's making grilled cheese in the toaster,

but as you can see it would be excellent for Gluten Free bread in a shared toaster.

http://youtu.be/iFchhzjj28I

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I replaced heaps of stuff and went gluten-free for the whole house, this eliminates any chance of problems.

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It seems they are available everywhere in the UK but not in the USA.

Here's a USA news video about Tosta Bags in this example it's making grilled cheese in the toaster,

but as you can see it would be excellent for Gluten Free bread in a shared toaster.

http://youtu.be/iFchhzjj28I

They are avalable in the US. I bought some in a kitchen goods store and ordered on-line. I only use them to travel. I don't eat much toast or bread.

On this link, we discuss where we got them & Jestgar has a liink to make your own bags

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Whole Foods also sells the toaster bags. I put my bread atop aluminum foil sometimes, but just got the bags and they are pretty nifty.

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I bought myself a toaster oven. And boy we didn't know what we were missing with that thing! I use it so much for so many other things rather than toast. Since its mine, it is 100% dedicated to gluten free. Ill let DH use it, but not for anything with gluten. He loves it too and says if we had more counter space, he would buy him and the kids one.

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Wow...I didn't even think about the can opener! You all sure are a wealth of knowledge!!

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Wow...I didn't even think about the can opener! You all sure are a wealth of knowledge!!

I have a hand-held can opener and just scrubbed it good using a new toothbrush.

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I've never used our can opener for anything other fruit and veg in a tin, and most of those even have a ring pull. Nothing with gluten in it has ever really come into our house in a can. Other than the couple of times I trialled my daughter on tinned spaghetti as a toddler, but they have a ring pull so no can opener needed, and haven't bought tinned spaghetti since then, neither of us like it.

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