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Soy Sauce


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6 replies to this topic

#1 xabbar

 
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Posted 22 February 2011 - 04:33 AM

I made a recipe last night with soy sauce which didn't say 'gluten free' on the label but none of the ingredients had gluten. This morning I have a headache. Am unsure how this could be. Most soy sauce actually says Wheat under ingredients but this one didn't. Am I missing something?
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#2 psawyer

 
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Posted 22 February 2011 - 07:34 AM

I don't think you are missing anything--wheat would be listed if it were an ingredient. There are some soy sauces that do not include wheat. Many products which are, in fact, gluten-free are not so labeled to avoid legal liability issues.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#3 Emilushka

 
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Posted 22 February 2011 - 03:07 PM

La Choy soy sauce and Kroger brand soy sauce are the two I've used that are gluten-free. Was it one of those? I can vouch for those two.
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#4 sa1937

 
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Posted 22 February 2011 - 03:31 PM

The last time I bought the Food Lion brand, it didn't have wheat listed either and I've been fine with it.
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#5 AzizaRivers

 
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Posted 22 February 2011 - 04:25 PM

Tamari is also fine. What brand was it?
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Celiac diagnosed October-November 2010 (blood test negative, biopsy inconclusive after gluten-free for 6 weeks, miraculous diet results).

October 2010: Gluten free.
November 2010: No HFCS or artificial sweeteners.
March 2011: Gradually fading out soy.

#6 larry mac

 
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Posted 23 February 2011 - 09:40 AM

My wife often eats take-out/delivery Chinese food. Lately I noticed the little packets of soy sauce that come with now contain no wheat, or gluten ingredients.

I tasted a little. Seemed very weak to me, almost flavorless. But then, I think I'm used to bold flavor in my soy sauce. Before Celiac, I would always say "may I say one word about soy sauce"? "Kikkomans"! I expect gluten-free soy sauce to come as close to that high level of quality as I can get it. Long fermenting times, very aromatic, bright & clean on the nose and palette, Full bodied, with depth & balance.

That immediately eliminates all store brands. There's a reason they cost a buck. Quality in soy sauce comes at a price. La Choy probably makes all those store brands, nuff said about that. Then there's San J. Better, but just doesn't compare to Eden Foods Organic Tamari Soy Sauce, in my opinion. Been using it for four years. Hands down the best gluten-free soy sauce I’ve tasted. I’m dying to try Kikkomans new gluten-free soy sauce, but haven’t seen it yet.

Here’s some info on this highly recommended gluten-free soy sauce. Educational also, lot's of history and info on tamari, miso, shoyu, etc.

best regards, lm

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Brand: Eden Foods
Product Name: Organic Tamari Soy Sauce
Size 10 oz
Kosher OK

Highest rated and only 'Highly Recommended' brand by Cooks Illustrated Magazine. A specially brewed, wheat free soy sauce made from organic soy beans. Traditionally aged in cedar casks for two years recreating the flavor and aroma of true tamari enjoyed for centuries in Japan. A robust seasoning and condiment. The best choice for longer cooking, commercial food production and for those with allergies to common wheat. Valued for its organic and amino acids. Amber glass bottled with a functional dispenser cap that delivers 'drops' or 'pours' as you desire and is refillable.

Ingredients: Whole Organic Soybeans, Water, Sea Salt, Organic Rice Alcohol, to preserve freshness (Water, Organic Rice, Koji (Aspergillus Oryzae)), Organic Soybean Flour, Koji

More info on Tamari:

EDEN Tamari Soy Sauce is made by master brewers, skilled in the art of koji fermentation handed down through generations. Made from whole organic, GEO free soybeans inoculated with koji (Aspergillus oryzae), water and the finest sea salt. It is carefully tended and aged in cedar casks through two seasonal cycles.

EDEN Organic Imported Tamari was named the best out of seven brands sampled by an expert panel of tasters in the San Francisco Bay area. The San Francisco Chronicle organized the tamari taste test for its "Tasters Choice" column. Panelists were Linda Anusasananan, food writer and consultant, San Mateo; John Carroll, cookbook author, San Francisco; Amanda Gold, San Francisco Chronicle Food staff; Shelley Handler, consultant, San Francisco; and Roland Passot, chef-owner, La Folie and five Left Banks. "In judging tamari, the panel looked for a smooth, rich flavor balanced by the right amount of salt," the Chronicle reported. "Common problems were harsh or sweet notes, or too much salt. The tamaris were served plain and with white rice." "The top tamari, in the panel's opinion, was Eden's imported version with the green label, which is organic and made in Japan in the traditional long-fermented way… This tamari was dark and thick, almost syrupy. Its flavor was 'rounded,' with a 'nice complexity of flavor' that balanced salt and caramel." ("Top Tamari Balances Sweet and Salty," San Francisco Chronicle , 28 March 2007.) EDEN Organic Imported Tamari earned 69 out of a possible 100 points. Other brands sampled earned from 14 to 60 points. Eden's domestically produced, U.S. Naturally Brewed Tamari (plum label) placed third in the taste test with 55 points. Panelists' comments included "Balanced taste," "salty, but not overly so," and "good flavor."

EDEN was also the highest rated and only 'Highly Recommended' brand in a recent comparison of 12 high end soy sauces by Cooks Illustrated Magazine. "Tasters decisively ranked this 'distinct' soy sauce number one in both taste tests. "Very savory, rounded and smooth. A solid finish in both taste tests," said the authors. Each soy sauce was rated on intensity of overall flavor, quality of salt flavor and overall likability when used both alone and in cooking. EDEN was the decisive favorite in both categories.

Originally the world's first soy sauce was tamari, the byproduct of making Hacho miso, a fermented soybean paste. It was the prized liquid that rose to the top of the cask as the miso was aging. This original 'true' tamari had a very thick consistency, a strong distinct flavor and aroma, and was the color of dark chocolate. For centuries this prized liquid was reserved for special occasions and was a rare commodity. Over the centuries master brewers discovered that they could produce more tamari by simply increasing the amount of liquid in Hacho miso production. This specially brewed sauce was thinner but had qualities similar to 'true' tamari.

Although EDEN Organic Tamari Soy Sauce is not the 'true' liquid from Hacho miso production, it is the specially brewed all purpose tamari soy sauce. EDEN Organic Tamari has a flavor that is reminiscent of miso and more pronounced than that of shoyu, with a thicker consistency and a deeper brown color. Unlike shoyu, that derives much of its flavor from the natural alcohol produced by the fermentation of wheat, tamari's rich flavor and aroma is due to the abundance of amino acids derived from soybeans.

In the 1960's George Ohsawa introduced macrobiotics to the West and first introduced a natural soy sauce that he called 'tamari'. This soy sauce was not a 'true' tamari, but a soy sauce called 'shoyu' in Japan. The product he called 'tamari soy sauce', was made of soybeans, wheat, koji, water and salt. Mr. Ohsawa wanted to distinguish naturally processed soy sauce, traditional shoyu, from commercial, chemically processed soy sauces marketed under the name 'shoyu' at the time. He did not anticipate the introduction of real tamari into North America, as it was a rare commodity. Purposely and unfortunately, misnaming the product 'tamari' eventually led to much linguistic confusion in the 1980s when 'wheat free' and 'real' tamari were introduced. EDEN Tamari Soy Sauce is a real, wheat free soy sauce.

Soy sauce should be chosen with care as one would choose a fine wine or olive oil. Eden's traditional brewing of Shoyu and Tamari takes two to three years. Today genuine soy sauce is rare. Many commercial soy sauces are made with sugar, water, salt, caramel coloring, genetically engineered and pharmaceutically derived enzymes and preservatives. Often genetically engineered soy meal that has been defatted using a hexane gas extraction process is used. Many commercial producers of tamari soy sauce add ethyl alcohol as a preservative. We add a bit of naturally fermented grain alcohol derived from organic rice to preserve freshness.

EDEN soy sauces are bottled in amber glass to protect their deep color, fragrant bouquet and rich character. Each has a functional dispenser cap that allows you to drip or pour as desired.

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gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa


#7 Takala

 
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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:12 PM

Did the recipe or ingredients have MSM in it ? I have heard that some Chinese MSM can have gluten in it, now. :(
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