Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

This Celiac Testing Confusing


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 eatlovehope

eatlovehope

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts

Posted 02 March 2011 - 09:59 PM

Hi
Sometime ago I posted my blood test results as follows
Anti-Gliadin IgG: 4 units - negative
Anti-Gliadin IgA: 31 units - positive
Tissue Transglutaminase Iga: 7 units - negative

Interpretation
0 - 20 Negative
20 - 30 Weak Pos
>30 - Positive

My doctor then sent me off for a biopsy which came back negative. I since have had a follow up with my GP and she stated that medically I'm not cased as a Celiac because of the negative biopsy.

I then asked her why would I test positive for Anti-Gliadin IGA. Is there any other health issue which would make you test positive for the same blood test. She said no, more likely that it was a false positive. (After already reading on this forum, I told her it's rare it's more likely to be a false negative with my biopsy)

She said that the Anti-Gliadin IGA is only 95% specific for celiac while the TTG IGA is 100% specific which I tested negative. I'm confused.........

I have been on my gluten-free diet for 4 weeks now and I just feel pretty much the same. I really didn't have huge symptoms before (slight IBS symptoms, more prominent about 10 years ago) but I was excited to start my gluten-free diet because I thought some symptoms might come alight after years of me thinking it was just normal. But no earth shattering changes. The only thing I have had though is that I haven't have a UTI since being gluten-free, I was getting these at least once a month, so very happy about that.

I'm going to stick to the gluten-free diet for some time yet but I'm confused to know if I actually have celiac's or even a gluten intolerance with my results.. Just want to know for future reference so that I might not need to be as strict on a gluten-free diet, which makes for an easier lifestyle.

Can anyone give me any insight in what you think my results mean?

Thanks
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 eatmeat4good

eatmeat4good

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,699 posts

Posted 02 March 2011 - 11:02 PM

I don't understand the testing.

I thought like you that any postive is positive.

I just want to encourage you on the note of the UTI infections.

I had chronic UTI and bladder spasms for years prior to going gluten free.

5 months into this gluten free, and I have not had one.

It IS related to gluten in my opinion.

Just wanted you to know others with that symptom have said the same thing.

And they get the symptoms of a UTI when glutened. I haven't had that yet.

I would get a second opinion from another Dr. if I were you. Another Dr. may know that any postive is a positive for Celiac.
  • 0
Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.
--Hippocrates

#3 eatlovehope

eatlovehope

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts

Posted 03 March 2011 - 01:46 AM

Thanks eatmeat4good. I agree I too don't understand the testing and also I thought like you that any postive is positive, so you can see why I'm confused.

That is fantastic to know about other people how also suffered UTI's. The UTI is something I have suffered many times over the years and it has become extremely frustrating.

So if the only phyiscal change I get from going gluten-free is not having any more UTI's, I still be extremely happy. I have been gluten-free now for the 4 weeks & I would of normally had 2 in that period of time.....
  • 0

#4 zus888

zus888

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 216 posts

Posted 03 March 2011 - 11:13 AM

Ok. Just want to say that I'm getting my information from only one source, but here goes.

Gliadin is a protein in gluten. You have tested positive for an antibody to the protein in gluten, which means that your immune system thinks that gluten is like a virus and will attack it.

Testing positive for antibodies to transglutaminase means that your body is attacking itself (i.e. the villi).

So, it seems to me that although you don't have celiac, you DO have gluten intolerance, which is just as important to treat through a gluten-free diet. Being gluten intolerant is no less serious than having celiac. According to the book I read, celiac is just one of many end results of gluten intolerance. You body is reacting to gluten through your immune system. When your immune system is constantly triggered to react (i.e. by eating gluten in your case), you will have chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation can cause a MULTITUDE of problems, from joint pain to lymphoma.

Go read "Healthier Without Wheat." It was a really enlightening book and will answer a lot of the questions you have.
  • 0
Suzanna

#5 eatlovehope

eatlovehope

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts

Posted 03 March 2011 - 04:14 PM

Thanks Zu888, that makes some sense. So I'm thinking that I'm gluten intolerance because the positive Gliadin antibody in my blood.
Interesting.

Thanks also for the book recommendation I will definitely check it out.

I appreciate your reply. Thankyou
  • 0

#6 mushroom

mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts

Posted 03 March 2011 - 06:08 PM

Amplifying what zus888 said:


What It Is
A tissue transglutaminase IgA and/or IgG test is used as part of an evaluation for certain autoimmune conditions, most notably celiac disease.

An autoimmune disease can occur when the body's immune system mistakenly perceives a nonthreatening substance in the case of people with celiac disease, gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and oats as a foreign invader and attacks it. This immune system response in celiac disease also involves the production of antibodies directed against an enzyme normally present in the intestines called tissue transglutaminase (tTG).

In celiac disease, the body produces two types of antibodies that attack tTG: immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Measuring the IgA form of tTG antibody in the blood is more useful in detecting celiac disease because it's made in the small intestine, where gluten causes inflammation and irritation in sensitive people.

Levels of the IgG form of tTG antibody, on the other hand, are less specific to celiac disease, but may still be useful in diagnosing the condition in people who are unable to make normal amounts of IgA antibodies.


Why It's Done
The tTG test is usually done to help doctors diagnose celiac disease.

Since most doctors don't recognize non-celiac gluten intolerance, many of them only use the tTG test and tell you to go away if you test negative for it. But if you have neural symptoms there is a good chance you are not making antibodies in the gut, so you will test negative for tTG.



  • 1
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#7 eatlovehope

eatlovehope

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts

Posted 25 March 2011 - 01:24 AM

Just thought I would post an update. After the suggestion from Zu888 (thank you for that), I have read the book Healthier without Wheat and it really has confirmed in my mind I am not Celiac Disease but I do have non-celiac gluten intolerance.

The only thing that I tested positive for was Anti-gliadin IGA, everything else was negative including the biopsy..

As per the book it states
"Gliadin is a type of gluten. When the immune system attacks gluten, it produces gliadin antitbodies. If you have gliadin antibodies, then it is apparent that your immune system has interpreted that gluten is not food; it is a foreign invader that must be eliminated from the body. It attacks any gluten you eat. If either your IgA or IgG gliadin antibody test is positive, then you have a strong immune reaction to gluten and thus a gluten intolerance".

This book was great and thanks again for the recommendation Zu888, it really gave me such a better understanding of my condition and I can confidently say that I have non-celiac gluten intolerance. Which basically has the same lifestyle outcome as Celiac, gluten free diet for life...
  • 0

#8 TJSpin

TJSpin

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 22 posts

Posted 24 February 2012 - 06:37 PM

If you listen to Dr. O'Bryan in this podcast, you'll hear him say that only 50% of celiacs react to Transglutaminase, the other 50% react to another protein. You may still be positive and have a negative Transglutaminase result.
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: