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#1 Lexi

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 10:18 PM

Does anyone else get sick when they go to the Dentist?? I love my Dentist, but I get sick everytime I go in for a cleaning or a filling. I have to immediately get in bed after every visit. I asked my Dentist about it, and he didn't seem to know what Celiac Disease was, and he told me he was sure that there was not wheat in any of his products. What should I do? I don't want to be sick, but I feel really funny asking him if I could see the labels of all the products that he uses. Does anyone else have this problem?
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#2 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 03:45 AM

I did until I found a dentist that would check what they used with me. While most products are safe there are some that are not. I really, really liked the dentist I had seen most of my life but when I asked them to check products they gave me a list of what they used. I thought great but found that many makers wouldn't give me any info since I wasn't the office calling.
My new dentist does check and the products that seemed to have the most risk, according to them was the stuff with flavoring so they use plain pumice to polish my teeth and changed the numbing agent they put on my gums before the numbing injections.
It is a shame that so many dentists are clueless because in some countries they are the first to notice a problem as the enamel is often affected. Here I heard countless times I had to cut down on sodas, when we almost never drank it, and lately they seem to think enamel damage is all from acidic fruit and drinks. It's a shame since many children could get diagnosed earlier if they were more knowledgeable.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 Stellar003

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 07:48 AM

I notice that I always get canker sores after a dentist visit....not sure about the other symptoms, as I'm newly diagnosed and wasn't watching for any correlation. I sure will next time. Thank you for bringing up this topic!
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#4 T.H.

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 09:27 AM

I'm my dentist's second celiac patient, and with his first, he looked into the disease and they called all their product manufacturers for their substances.

And yes, sometimes the flavoring can be gluten derived. I, too, use the plain pumice to polish.

If, however, he checks it all, it's all gluten-free, and there's still a problem? Another potential issue can be the sterilization and cleaning of the instruments. It depends on how good the office is, and also on their sterilization process. Dental instruments are usually scrubbed down and then sterilized to destroy disease causing organisms, but as we know, gluten is not a disease causing organism. So there are approved methods for sterilization that won't destroy the gluten, even though they work fine on sanitizing.

If that office happened to have a sloppy scrubber of instruments, and their autoclave wasn't a type that destroyed proteins...that could be a problem. You can get glutened from gluten on a previous patient's teeth (and isn't that a lovely thought?). There are UV light based autoclaves, for example, that are lethal to living organisms, but you can see where they'd have no effect on gluten at all. If your dentist has an autoclave that goes to 500 F or above, though, then that will destroy the gluten. This is the kind my dentist has.
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T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#5 Judy3

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 09:43 AM

If that office happened to have a sloppy scrubber of instruments, and their autoclave wasn't a type that destroyed proteins...that could be a problem. You can get glutened from gluten on a previous patient's teeth (and isn't that a lovely thought?).


Oh My is that a gross thought or what? ewwwww
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*Judy

Food allergies to fish, seafood, tree nuts, aspartame(Equal),flax seed, and many drugs
Stomach issues since childhood
Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) age 6-44
Diabetes age 44 to present now going back to Hypoglycemia since gluten free.
Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2005 and it's gone now that I'm aspartame and gluten free. Hmmm
Celiac disease- negative test in 2009, positive tests in Nov. 2010
Gluten free started 11/08/2010
Genetic tests positive- DQ2, positive -DQ6 (?) negative- DQ8 11/15/2010

#6 Ahorsesoul

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 10:06 AM

I suggest you find a dentist who is concerned enough to KNOW if his products contain gluten.
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1960s-had symptoms-could have been before but don't remember
1970s-told had colitis or nervous stomach-was given phenobarbital, felt great but still had symptoms
Me, dd and ds diagnosed with Lactose Intolerance
2000-osteopenia
2001-had stroke because of medications I was given
June 2003-saw Chiropractor who specialized in nutrition: Celiac Disease not Lactose Intolerance, went gluten free with once in awhile cheating, off soy and dairy for about 6 months
June 2003-found excellent doctor for fibromyalgia (who has found out she has Celiac Disease)
May 2006-went gluten free with NO cheating-excellent! Made all the difference in the world

#7 Lexi

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 02:23 PM

I notice that I always get canker sores after a dentist visit....not sure about the other symptoms, as I'm newly diagnosed and wasn't watching for any correlation. I sure will next time. Thank you for bringing up this topic!


That's strange because now that you mention it, I got two big sores on the inside of my lip last time I went. However, I thought it was from me biting my lip really hard and not knowing it because I was SO NUMB.
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#8 dilettantesteph

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 04:13 AM

Thank you for the posts. I've gotten sick the last two times. I'll ask for plain pumice next time and see if that makes the difference. I'll also ask about the autoclave.
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#9 srall

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 05:50 AM

It's funny you bring this up. I always get a little bit of a stomach ache, but my little daughter always gets sick. Last time she had a filling she got a rash, which made me suspect there may have been corn in something. Are there dentists willing to check? I'll have to look into that.
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#10 Gemini

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 11:40 AM

I'm my dentist's second celiac patient, and with his first, he looked into the disease and they called all their product manufacturers for their substances.

And yes, sometimes the flavoring can be gluten derived. I, too, use the plain pumice to polish.

If, however, he checks it all, it's all gluten-free, and there's still a problem? Another potential issue can be the sterilization and cleaning of the instruments. It depends on how good the office is, and also on their sterilization process. Dental instruments are usually scrubbed down and then sterilized to destroy disease causing organisms, but as we know, gluten is not a disease causing organism. So there are approved methods for sterilization that won't destroy the gluten, even though they work fine on sanitizing.

If that office happened to have a sloppy scrubber of instruments, and their autoclave wasn't a type that destroyed proteins...that could be a problem. You can get glutened from gluten on a previous patient's teeth (and isn't that a lovely thought?). There are UV light based autoclaves, for example, that are lethal to living organisms, but you can see where they'd have no effect on gluten at all. If your dentist has an autoclave that goes to 500 F or above, though, then that will destroy the gluten. This is the kind my dentist has.



This post really begs a response.....I have a pretty savvy dentist and have done reams of research on dental products only to find that I couldn't find any which contain gluten. I am at the dentist every 3 months for cleanings and am currently having 2 dental implants done and have never once gotten sick from a gluten hit. Most dental products use gluten-free gums like guar or xanthan as thickening agents in their products and Celiacs may have a reaction to gums but it isn't from gluten. The flavorings in polish or toothpaste...nope, all my research showed it's a non-issue. I am about as sensitive as a Celiac comes and to this date, 6 years gluten-free, have never gotten sick at the dentist except for a Celiac type reaction from a product containing guar gum.
I did hours of research on this and called dental company reps because of the amount of work I had to have done on my teeth and they were extremely helpful and aware that this is a huge potential problem for us. No gluten. I am not saying that people aren't having a reaction because I am sure they are but the odds of it being from gluten is so low it isn't on the radar.

The second idea that autoclaves may not be doing their job is just plain silly. Trust me, in the day of HIV and other communicable diseases, dentists do make sure their instruments are clean....very clean. There may be dirty dentists out there but I would venture to guess the number is so small, you would be able to guess by their office anyway when you went in and wouldn't go back. If autoclaves can destroy the HIV virus, then why would anyone think that gluten would be hanging out on the instruments, just waiting to get ya? Any scrubbing process would remove potential problems....I can do that easily enough in my kitchen sink with plain soap so why would anyone be worried about the dental office? Really...this isn't a worry.

If someone is getting sick at the dentist, then most likely the culprit is another intolerance. How do I know that? It happened to me. I found out the problem were the gums in some of their products...there was no gluten to be found. Gums really bother me and give me the same type of reaction as gluten does. It's always prudent and necessary to check ingredients but I did the research and found most dentists use like products....there isn't a huge selection out there. I spent a lot of time on this and couldn't find any product that was not gluten-free. If you do, post it because people need to know but I really don't think it's as big of an issue as many here believe. The vast majority of natural flavorings do not contain gluten.
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#11 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 12:28 PM

This post really begs a response.....I have a pretty savvy dentist and have done reams of research on dental products only to find that I couldn't find any which contain gluten. I am at the dentist every 3 months for cleanings and am currently having 2 dental implants done and have never once gotten sick from a gluten hit. Most dental products use gluten-free gums like guar or xanthan as thickening agents in their products and Celiacs may have a reaction to gums but it isn't from gluten. The flavorings in polish or toothpaste...nope, all my research showed it's a non-issue. I am about as sensitive as a Celiac comes and to this date, 6 years gluten-free, have never gotten sick at the dentist except for a Celiac type reaction from a product containing guar gum.
I did hours of research on this and called dental company reps because of the amount of work I had to have done on my teeth and they were extremely helpful and aware that this is a huge potential problem for us. No gluten. I am not saying that people aren't having a reaction because I am sure they are but the odds of it being from gluten is so low it isn't on the radar.

The second idea that autoclaves may not be doing their job is just plain silly. Trust me, in the day of HIV and other communicable diseases, dentists do make sure their instruments are clean....very clean. There may be dirty dentists out there but I would venture to guess the number is so small, you would be able to guess by their office anyway when you went in and wouldn't go back. If autoclaves can destroy the HIV virus, then why would anyone think that gluten would be hanging out on the instruments, just waiting to get ya? Any scrubbing process would remove potential problems....I can do that easily enough in my kitchen sink with plain soap so why would anyone be worried about the dental office? Really...this isn't a worry.

If someone is getting sick at the dentist, then most likely the culprit is another intolerance. How do I know that? It happened to me. I found out the problem were the gums in some of their products...there was no gluten to be found. Gums really bother me and give me the same type of reaction as gluten does. It's always prudent and necessary to check ingredients but I did the research and found most dentists use like products....there isn't a huge selection out there. I spent a lot of time on this and couldn't find any product that was not gluten-free. If you do, post it because people need to know but I really don't think it's as big of an issue as many here believe. The vast majority of natural flavorings do not contain gluten.


Glad you have had such great luck. I didn't with my old dentist. My gluten reactions are very specific and whether it was a reaction to flavors, CC of the powdered gloves (my new dentist uses unpowdered ones) or something else doesn't matter to me, it was definately gluten. I have had extensive work done with my new dentist, who took the time to check everything they use, and have no reactions with their office.
I agree with you completely about the autoclaves.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#12 larry mac

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 07:11 PM

Never had a problem. And I get my teeth cleaned three times yearly, plus occasional appointments for other things. Also, I've had two different dentists since I was diagnosed.

best regards, lm
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gluten-free 12-18-06

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#13 T.H.

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 09:58 PM

The second idea that autoclaves may not be doing their job is just plain silly. Trust me, in the day of HIV and other communicable diseases, dentists do make sure their instruments are clean....very clean.


I didn't say the autoclaves weren't doing their job - they are. But their job is to deal with, as you mentioned, things like viruses and other living pathogens. It's not to destroy non-living proteins. And there are numerous types of autoclaves - the UV light, gas, dry heat and steam heat - and some of these are simply not as effective at completely destroying proteins.

My dentist actually chose the autoclave system he did BECAUSE it could destroy proteins as well - he said as much when I was asking him about the system.

Sanitizing isn't the same thing as destroying allergens, so while some techniques, machines, or substances can deal with both living organisms AND proteins, quite a few will only eliminate the disease carrying organisms while the proteins remain intact.

And as for scrubbing taking care of the problem? Hopefully, yes. A good office with enough time and conscientious employees is going to be very diligent about scrubbing. However, many times the instruments are scrubbed in, again, a solution aimed at sanitizing rather than a soap and water solution. They are very often scrubbed in the free moments in between patients, unless the office is big enough to have someone who simply deal with that, so scrubbing is a rushed affair, more often than not. And many of the instruments, as they get older, get worn. They get resharpened periodically, but they develop nicks and scratches in between sharpenings, which are hard to scrub as we all know from our experiences with pots and pans.

I worked with a periodontist for a couple years, who was considered one of the best in our area, where I got to help scrub out the instruments myself and use multiple autoclaves during my time there, both gas and heat, and I can tell you first hand that there WERE a few times where I caught an instrument that still had something on it after coming out of the autoclave when we were setting up the trays for a patient. The hygienists weren't that surprised - it didn't seem uncommon, based on their reaction. Of course, we would put it back to be cleaned rather than use it, but if there was stuff that we could see, I'm sure there was stuff that we couldn't see that could be enough to gluten someone, in the wrong circumstances.


Now, do I think gluten on dental instruments is a huge risk? No. Dental offices work really hard at keeping clean, in my experience. But is it a possibility to be considered if one is getting a gluten reaction at the dentist multiple times? I really do think so.

Just as a related aside, I have a friend with anaphylactic allergies to certain foods and she only uses dentists who have over 500 F autoclaves for their protein destroying properties, too.
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T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#14 dilettantesteph

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 04:04 AM

I find stuck on particles of food after I run the dishwasher. It is certainly possible for it to happen after cleaning of dental equipment. Though I hope that it happens a lot less often! When the size of particle that will gluten a very sensitive celiac could be invisible to the human eye, it seem possible that it could happen in the dentist's office.
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#15 BethJ

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 10:35 AM

This post really begs a response.....I have a pretty savvy dentist and have done reams of research on dental products only to find that I couldn't find any which contain gluten. I am at the dentist every 3 months for cleanings and am currently having 2 dental implants done and have never once gotten sick from a gluten hit. Most dental products use gluten-free gums like guar or xanthan as thickening agents in their products and Celiacs may have a reaction to gums but it isn't from gluten. The flavorings in polish or toothpaste...nope, all my research showed it's a non-issue. I am about as sensitive as a Celiac comes and to this date, 6 years gluten-free, have never gotten sick at the dentist except for a Celiac type reaction from a product containing guar gum.
I did hours of research on this and called dental company reps because of the amount of work I had to have done on my teeth and they were extremely helpful and aware that this is a huge potential problem for us. No gluten. I am not saying that people aren't having a reaction because I am sure they are but the odds of it being from gluten is so low it isn't on the radar.

The second idea that autoclaves may not be doing their job is just plain silly. Trust me, in the day of HIV and other communicable diseases, dentists do make sure their instruments are clean....very clean. There may be dirty dentists out there but I would venture to guess the number is so small, you would be able to guess by their office anyway when you went in and wouldn't go back. If autoclaves can destroy the HIV virus, then why would anyone think that gluten would be hanging out on the instruments, just waiting to get ya? Any scrubbing process would remove potential problems....I can do that easily enough in my kitchen sink with plain soap so why would anyone be worried about the dental office? Really...this isn't a worry.

If someone is getting sick at the dentist, then most likely the culprit is another intolerance. How do I know that? It happened to me. I found out the problem were the gums in some of their products...there was no gluten to be found. Gums really bother me and give me the same type of reaction as gluten does. It's always prudent and necessary to check ingredients but I did the research and found most dentists use like products....there isn't a huge selection out there. I spent a lot of time on this and couldn't find any product that was not gluten-free. If you do, post it because people need to know but I really don't think it's as big of an issue as many here believe. The vast majority of natural flavorings do not contain gluten.


It's wonderful that you've researched this so well. I have some extensive - and expensive - dental work coming up and I always dread the worry over gluten in his office. This has done a lot to reassure me.

Did your research also show dental floss to be gluten-free? A long time ago there was a discussion here about flavored and unflavored dental floss. It was surmised that Reach dental floss was safe in the unflavored varieties but not the mint or other flavors. I've stuck to the unflavored kind but still have about 4 packages of mint stuck away for my husband's use. Do you think they're safe?

Since then I've always taken my own floss to the dentist when I go in for cleanings but it would be nice not to have to worry about this.
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Beth in Florida

Gluten-free since 7/19/08
Alcohol free since 6/28/10


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