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Why Can't She Have It In Moderation?


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#1 JustForJen

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 08:41 PM

My wife was recently diagnosed with Celiac's disease and as the always concerned husband I have been researching all weekend trying to learn everything I can. As far as I can tell she has to quit gluten for good. I have not read or seen anything that says she can have cake on her birthday or stuffing at thanksgiving. Moderation does not apply. I would like to be able to tell her that "yeah you can have cake but it'll make you sick for the rest of the night but tomorrow you will fell fine" at least have the option to indulged every so often and suffer the consequences. Is that accurate? Will she just have her symptoms for a short period of time or is their some other long term consequences that result from the occasionally consumption of Gluten. I cannot find any information referencing one way or the other. Additionally it will be at least two weeks before we can get her into her new Gastroenterologist as we are moving, so I cannot have this conversation with a professional for at least some time.

Thanks
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#2 kenlove

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 09:36 PM

From being on the board here for a number of years, I can say that most of us are very different and have vastly different levels of sensitivity. I would never think of cheating once and accidents that occasionally happen usually lay me up for 3 or 4 days in intense pain and misery. So I don't take chances. I can't walk into bakeries and my wife cant have flour in the house. If she wants to make a cake in her own pans, she has to mix things outside although usually she will cook them at our daughters house. It will be a change of lifestyle that you have to work on together. I was sick once when the colander was not washed well after she made her own noodles in her own pot. Sick for 3 days because of a piece of dried spaghetti when I used it -- I had not gotten around to getting my own -- In short its not easy and it takes awhile to learn - much comes from experience -- It also takes awhile to learn the degree of sensitivity she will be to gluten containing items and cross contamination.
Wish you both luck
ken

My wife was recently diagnosed with Celiac's disease and as the always concerned husband I have been researching all weekend trying to learn everything I can. As far as I can tell she has to quit gluten for good. I have not read or seen anything that says she can have cake on her birthday or stuffing at thanksgiving. Moderation does not apply. I would like to be able to tell her that "yeah you can have cake but it'll make you sick for the rest of the night but tomorrow you will fell fine" at least have the option to indulged every so often and suffer the consequences. Is that accurate? Will she just have her symptoms for a short period of time or is their some other long term consequences that result from the occasionally consumption of Gluten. I cannot find any information referencing one way or the other. Additionally it will be at least two weeks before we can get her into her new Gastroenterologist as we are moving, so I cannot have this conversation with a professional for at least some time.

Thanks


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"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

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#3 seashele2

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 10:45 PM

A lifetime of being completely gluten-free is the only treatment for celiac and other gluten-caused diseases. In our family, I am celiac, my uncle is celiac, my sister-in-law is celiac and my daughter is celiac. She got the genes from both sides of the family. My sister-in-law used to do the part-time gluten-free thing and couldn't figure out why she was having so many health problems. Her new gastro finally got through to her that celiac is a full-time disease and the treatment also needs to be full-time. My uncle cheats on his diet frequently and is also having problems. My gastro explained it like this: A type 1 diabetic (autoimmune disease) can not take insulin part-time and stay healthy. A celiac (autoimmune disease) can not eat a part-time gluten-free diet and stay healthy either.

Celiacs consuming gluten might only feel sick for 3 or 4 days, but the damage it causes will take weeks or months to heal. I have been gluten-free for 6 1/2 years and I have cake every birthday and stuffing every Thanksgiving, but they are gluten-free. Now, more than ever, there are awesome gluten-free mixes for cake and recipes for gluten-free stuffings. Tremendously more than there were even 3 or 4 years ago.
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#4 a1956chill

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 11:19 PM

Moderation does not apply, strict adherence to a gluten free diet is the prescribed course of treatment for a diagnosed celiac. There are possible long term consequences if one does not say gluten free. Malabsorption of vitamins and minerals can cause major vitamin and mineral deficiencies ,leaky gut,cancer, gluten ataxia to mention just a few.



This is a link to a very good web site that will help you and your wife with gluten free baking
My link

the site has some great recipes for sweets :)
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Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#5 Juliebove

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 11:54 PM

She can have gluten free cake and gluten free stuffing. If she has the wheat based stuff, she could not only be sick for many days (I don't think most people feel better the next day) but would be damaging her body further. Also some people do not notice the ill effects but just as much damage occurs.

Yes, mistakes will be made and she will at some point accidentally ingest gluten. She might misread a label and think something is safe. I know I have done that with my daughter. Or she could eat something that has been cross contaminated. Or she might eat food from some well meaning person that really isn't safe. It will happen at some point and she will have to deal with it.

But to deliberately eat gluten just because it is a holiday? That's sort of like killing yourself but slowly and painfully.
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#6 Takala

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 12:31 AM

Some people such as myself, instead of getting "sick" per se with gut problems, get neurological symptoms mimicing MS. My eyes will have more trouble tracking together and my sense of balance goes off. Years before this, I had a continuous series of buzzing/numbness in my muscles in my upper arms/shoulders and numbness in my hands and feet, plus muscle spasms. My one foot dragged and the other one was weaker. My arthritis would also flare up dramatically. My lower back always hurt and was very stiff, as was my neck. My c- spine is permanently damaged from this, related auto immune arthritis, and the previous malnutrition. It is a miracle I can pass for normal and do things, but I have been doing physical therapy and some yoga balance exercises for about 20 years, more or less.

I don't know about you, but this neuro stuff is not an appealing sort of holiday sensation to anticipate over somebody else's convenience food. It's not like gluten free cake and bread cannot be made. I guess another analogy would be it's like telling an alcoholic to go ahead and have a few beers on the weekends anyway, because everybody knows it's only the hard liquor that counts.
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#7 mushroom

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 01:35 AM

Hey, lighten up a little bit there, JustForJen. This is not a sentence that has been imposed, it is just a different way of eating. There are very few things that can't be made gluten free. Well, maybe mille feuille,.... But there's precious little that you really have to give up except the stuff that is made the gluten way. Think of this as an eating and cooking adventure, there are thousands of recipes on the internet for practically anything you can think of made gluten free. Time to expand your taste buds and become more adventurous. But hold off a little while on all the gluten free processed foods and wait until your taste buds have forgotten what gluten tastes like, because that is what you were raised on. Then take your newly cleansed taste buds into the gluten free world. Just as with gluten foods, there will be some things you don't like, but you will be amazed how good things can taste. My proudest moment was when a local who prided herself on her baking skills said "OMG, who made this delicious macaroon cake?" And when I admitted I did she got this look :unsure: "Is it gluten free?" :lol: Someone else said to me after staying at our house for 3 nights, "I'm not afraid of gluten free food any more." :blink: That one cracked me up. :D

So don't cry. Grieve, yes, for a way of life that is gone, but better times lie ahead. Your pollyanna message for the day.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

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Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#8 K8ling

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 02:42 AM

My uncle just died at 45 from colon cancer.... from undiagnosed Celiac.

It is not good. She needs to stop it all the time.
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Diagnosed with Gluten Allergy April 2010. Family history of Celiac disease and bowel cancers. Already feeling a billion times better since going gluten free.

#9 lynnelise

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 05:22 AM

Trust me, eating a piece of "real" cake on my birthday would not be an indulgence I'd want to make. Spending the day in the bathroom and the next week fatigued with joint pain, tingling in my arms and legs, canker sores, and a rash does not make for a good birthday.

The good news is you can fabulous cakes gluten free. I made the best cake for my daughters birthday. Chocolate roulade w/ cream cheese icing, covered in chocolate ganache! No one had a clue it was gluten free! Everyone said it was the best cake ever and it looks quite fancy! :)
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#10 tea_and_crumpets

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 05:43 AM

Sure, she can have cake and stuffing -- she just has to have gluten free cake and stuffing. Pretty much anything she wants can be replicated. I can make cakes now that even my gluten eating family think taste just as good and the stuffing I made last Thanksgiving tasted just like my mom's homemade.

It's just food, you know? I'm not willing to risk my long-term health for twenty minutes of pleasure.
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#11 Fire Fairy

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 06:06 AM

I too have neurological issues with gluten. It isn't worth it to me to take any chances when I think something might be cross contaminated so I would never consider eating something filled with gluten. Observers may not necessarily see the damage done to us but it still happens and as was pointed out by another poster it can kill.

Katz Gluten free online bakery makes awesome cupcakes. This means it can be done. You can make/find a wonderful gluten free cake for your wife. No doubt stuffing can be made yummy also. :)
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If you over-salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: 'I made it, you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!'-unknown

#12 Camp Laffalot

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 06:10 AM

You can BOTH have a lot of fun on this new culinary adventure! My husband is not celiac, but he has become a Pamela's Cookies addict right along with me. He also LOVES the granola from The Bakery on Main. There are sooooo many wonderful gluten free foods out there! This is a fabulous opportunity to experience NEW and very tasty food! Enjoy!
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#13 Waverlywoods

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 06:33 AM

it is very wise to go completely gluten free. The damage the immune system does the human body, in response to gluten is cumulative. Accidental exposer is likely, so your efforts should be focused on that. Futhermore once the body has been worn down to certain point from this and other stressors, people often develop other intolerances such as dairy, soy, nuts, who knows what? This situation can get very dicey and it can sneak up on you. So by all means... Everyone goes through a stage I think where they can't imagaine how just a little bit of gluten would really hurt every once in a while. This attitude is a normal response, but ultimately it is very dangerous
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#14 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 06:54 AM

Your a great husband to be looking out for your wife. Celiac is autoimmune and injesting gluten causes the antibodies to flare up. Her reactions to 'just one piece of cake' or just a bite of something or even a 'deep' kiss from you after you have consumed or drunk something with gluten will cause those antibodies to start coursing through her body. For quite a few of us just a little bit of gluten after being gluten free causes an even more severe reaction than what we were experiencing when we were diagnosed. It can take quite a while for that reaction to die down, for me the time frame is over 3 weeks of misery. It isn't just a stomach reaction it can effect the entire body and any organ. It just isn't worth it. There are so many good gluten free alternatives available for everything from pizza to cake and cookies as well as bread. Read as much as you can here and ask any questions you need to. If she is firmly diagnosed you don't need to wait to see the new GI to get answers, if he or she is not well experienced with celiac you are likely to just hear that she should avoid gluten. There is a lot to be learned so read and ask. You'll get the hang of it in no time.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#15 angel9165

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 09:44 AM

On my 6th month of being gluten-free and I am one who really, really likes to eat. I have cake all the time, just without the gluten. I have found that when I take my gluten-free treats, they go quicker. People tell me the chocolate is more chocolaty and I don't mind sharing my "special food". Gluten free stuffing isn't a big issue either. For that matter, I even got my gravy at thanksgiving (compliments of corn starch) so I don't feel like I'm totally missing out. I won't lie...I crave deep dish pizza w/ a cold bud select but I would not tempt fate. Your wife will find that the longer she goes w/o gluten, the more intolerant she will become. I did ALL my cheating the 3 weeks from diagnoses to the appointment w/ the GI doc where he told me I couldn't. Since then, I've been gluten ed a few times but not intentionally. You are a good husband to want to take care of your wife and make sure her taste buds are happy but this is one thing that all you can do is support her through the transition. I wish her the best as she gets through the initial shock of being without and may she quickly learn the joys of good food w/o gluten. =)
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Diagnosed w/ Celiac disease on Sept 1st, 2010


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