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Input On Enterolab Results
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Hi all,

I have received my results from Enterolab and will post below. Any feedback would be appreciated. My results of bloodwork were negative for Celiac but was told I have antibodies for it. I don't have the lab results however. I'm guessing from the description that I'm gluten sensitive and do not have Celiac disease but get confused when it comes to genetics and alpha vs beta. I believe Enterolab does not test alpha.

Also, I have confirmed microscopic colitis as well as Grave's Disease. Thanks in advance.

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 58 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 31 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score Less than 300 Units (Normal Range is less than 300 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 21 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0603

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 5,6)

C) Egg, Yeast, and Soy Food Sensitivity Stool Panel

Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 20 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 15 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-soy IgA 25 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe. This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by the American Red Cross - Northeast Division. It has not been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-soy IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

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I don't know what kind of feedback you want. I consider Elab's interpretation of your results very easy to understand. Whether or not you have 'true' celiac disease, your Elab results (esp. TtG antibodies) show that gluten damages your intestines. Also you react to casein. So your next move would be to eliminate gluten and casein from your diet. Whether or not you get a mainstream doc's dx of celiac disease, gluten will damage your intestines. So your choice seems clear to me ...

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You say your doctor said your bloodwork was negative but that he also said you have antibodies. Did you get a hard copy of your results? Some doctors will call a low positive a negative but that is like saying you are 'only a little bit pregnant'. Or did he also do a gene test and you don't carry the genes that are normally considered celiac associated. If that is the case you need to know that commonly they only gene test for two of the many celiac associated genes.

Your Enterolab tests were strongly positive. If your not going to have anymore celiac related testing I would go gluten and casien free. It would also be a good idea to drop eggs for now and then challenge them when you are fully healed.

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Looking at the results it looks to me that you should not consume gluten....off topic, how long did it take you to get your Enterolab results? (I am considering testing there as well) thanks!

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Thanks for the replies. I'm sorry if I wasn't clear on what I was asking. I do understand that I was high on everything and went gluten, casein and soy free even before I got the results back. I have notice a minor improvement in my symptoms but I believe there is a lot of healing which needs to take place. Since I received the results I have also eliminated eggs and yeast which is very hard. I'm hoping that after some time and healing I can occasionally add egg and yeast back into my diet.

I'm not sure if I have a true intolerance to all of these proteins or if I have developed the sensitivities from all the damage over the years. I don't know if I have celiac disease but obviously I have gluten intolerance as well as microscopic colitis.

I did not get a hard copy of my blood work. I'm not sure if he did a gene test. The only info which was given to me was that I had the antibodies for celiac disease but when the remainder of the blood work and the biopsy came back negative he told me I didn't need to go gluten free. This happened a while ago and my symptoms continued to get worse. I decided to get the Enterolab testing done. I wasn't sure if anyone here understood the specifics of genetics and could elaborate further on it and if not, that is fine too. I know I don't have the 2 main markers for celiac disease but wasn't sure what mine indicated other than a gluten sensitivity and the fact that I have double DQ1 genes which means I may have more severe reactions as well as additional intolerances.

I'm very limited to what I can eat and still have cramping and D although it isn't as heavy in volume as it was before the diet change.

Teri Lou- It took exactly 3 weeks to the day to get my results emailed to me. They state 2-3 weeks but when I checked at 2 weeks they said they were consistently taking 3 weeks to get the results posted. It was a long wait but I'm glad I did the testing. Good luck to you.

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