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Thinking Of Going Vegetarian


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21 replies to this topic

#1 Fire Fairy

 
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Posted 20 March 2011 - 07:02 AM

I've never eaten a lot of meat but I've always eaten some. So I have just a few reservations about going meat free.

My father likes to cook and to him it's not a meal without meat. He cooks once maybe twice a week. I'm wondering if it would be too much of a burden on him (the only gluten eater in the household) for me to also eliminate meat from my diet.

I'm also concerned because I keep reading posts from ex-vegetarians on this board. People who were meat free but because they went gluten free added meat back to their diets.

I've only been gluten free since November. I think this would be a good time to go Vegetarian as it seems all the pre-prepared food I eat says Vegan on the label. (I had to eliminate dairy also) On the other hand having limited my diet as much as I have because of the gluten my friends and family are very worried about the idea of my giving up meat.

Any thoughts? Advise? Etc..
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If you over-salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: 'I made it, you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!'-unknown

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#2 ElseB

 
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Posted 20 March 2011 - 07:14 AM

I was vegetarian for 8 years and within a 2 months of being diagnosed with Celiac I started eating meat. I decided that one food restriction was enough. I've been in so many situations where the choices were eat meat or eat nothing. I'll take the meat thank you very much! I will clarify though that I was never was a vegetarian for ethical reasons and so I understand that that's a big thing for some people. I simply never felt well after eating meat. But I have no problems now. I think it was probably just the undiagnosed celiac that was affecting my body's ability to digest certain things.
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#3 iamsarar

 
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Posted 20 March 2011 - 08:40 AM

I am a newly diagnosed Vegetarian and i Had thought about adding meat to my diet again. I had bought some to add to a sauce I was cooking. When I took it out of the pack I started to gag but I continued to cook it. When we sat down for dinner no one liked the taste or texture. I haven't cooked any again and don't feel I need to. I like the way I feel when I didn't have meat in my meal. Tell your dad you are on a path to healthy eating and not eating meat right now will help get you there. For me, when I ate meat it just sat in my tummy like a rock. Maybe when he is cooking he can put some aside before adding the meat. Like if he is making a sauce, put a little in another pan before adding the meat. Before I became a vegetarian my daughter was a non-meat eater and this is what I would do for her. If I made tacos I would make hers with rice and bean. Now though, we all eat the same. When I had talked to the doctor about eating meat again she said "why? you are so healthy with out it look at all you blood work" That was good enough for me!

Maybe help your dad do some of the cooking and show him some ideas. For me and my family I think vegetarian eating is the healthiest and the best. It isn't for everyone though. You might need to do some of your own cooking but if you are thinking about trying it I think you for go for it!
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#4 starrytrekchic

 
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Posted 20 March 2011 - 09:34 AM

I've been veggie 14 years and gluten free 1 and 1/2. I haven't had a problem with it, nor have I felt the need to add meat back to make things easier or anything like that.

My fam has always been super supportive, both about me being veggie and gluten free (I'm the only one for both.) I don't ask them to fix anything special, but sometimes they do anyway. Generally, I just make my own meals, or I have what they're having minus the parts I can't eat. If I were you, I'd eat anything your dad cooks that you can (so as not to hurt his feelings) and then substitute other things if necessary.

Are you dairy free for good or just while you're healing? If it's just while you're healing, you might want to add small amounts back into your diet to see what you can tolerate. Personally, I'd have a very difficult time going dairy free as well, on top of the vegetarian and gluten-free restrictions.
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#5 RideAllWays

 
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Posted 20 March 2011 - 12:39 PM

I eat a vegan diet and am gluten and soy free. It is definitely possible, if you want any recipes message me. Chickpeas are probably the best invention ever. I've been gluten free for over two years now. It's nearly impossible to eat at restaurants while vegan (except for salad, always check the dressing) but vegeterian would be much easier, if you can handle eggs and dairy. It's fully do-able, and if it's what you want then go for it!
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#6 a1956chill

 
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Posted 20 March 2011 - 12:47 PM

if you can tolerate legumes (beans) vegan or vegetarian is totally doable . I would suggest caution with soy though,

this was one of my favorite recipe web sites when I was vegan
My link
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Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#7 gf_soph

 
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Posted 20 March 2011 - 07:06 PM

As long as you can cover your nutritional needs there's no reason not to go vegetatrian. Some people go back to meat if they have problems with dairy or soy, but it's a personal choice. Since you aren't eating dairy, you need to make sure you can eat legumes and some soy to replace meat. If you can, you will be fine. I would advise getting your iron and B12 levels checked to make sure they are fine, just because it requires a little more planning to keep those levels strong, and you need to know if you are low to start with.

If you're concerned about inconveniencing your dad, why not learn how to cook a couple of meals that you can freeze, that way when your dad is cooking you can defrost your food and eat any vegetarian part of his meal. Also, once you start making some tasty and filling vegetarian meals you might have a convert. Myself, my mum and sister are vegetarian, and my dad eats meat. He loves veggie meals like dhal and curries, he eats meat a few times a week only.

It is totally possible to be a very healthy vegetarian, just make sure you keep an eye on your nutrition. Your family and friends will come round when they see you eating well and being healthy.
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#8 Fire Fairy

 
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Posted 21 March 2011 - 08:24 AM

Thank you all! I really appreciate all the insight and support. You have been very encouraging. Hopefully I can add back dairy sometime. I can tolerate beans very well. (knock on wood) I want to go vegetarian both for the animals and my health.
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If you over-salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: 'I made it, you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!'-unknown

#9 Fire Fairy

 
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Posted 21 March 2011 - 08:25 AM

if you can tolerate legumes (beans) vegan or vegetarian is totally doable . I would suggest caution with soy though,

this was one of my favorite recipe web sites when I was vegan
My link


Thanks for the link. :)
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If you over-salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: 'I made it, you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!'-unknown

#10 Fire Fairy

 
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Posted 21 March 2011 - 08:26 AM

I eat a vegan diet and am gluten and soy free. It is definitely possible, if you want any recipes message me. Chickpeas are probably the best invention ever. I've been gluten free for over two years now. It's nearly impossible to eat at restaurants while vegan (except for salad, always check the dressing) but vegeterian would be much easier, if you can handle eggs and dairy. It's fully do-able, and if it's what you want then go for it!


Thank you. I might just take you up on some recipes soon. :)
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If you over-salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: 'I made it, you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!'-unknown

#11 crimbles

 
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Posted 22 March 2011 - 07:53 AM

I tend to stick to a pescatarian diet, with no dairy. Its nice to have some savory fish every once in a while, its definitely a healthy treat! I think that if you want to eliminate meat, maybe you should try eliminating red meat and pork first. those two are least healthy for you and the mass farming of pigs and cows is most harmful to the environment. I stick to free range chicken, eggs and fish.

Also, pre made and frozen meals can end up being really bad for you, no matter how healthy they seem. Take some vegan cooking classes and get creative, freeze the leftovers and then you can always be sure what is going into your body!
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#12 Juliebove

 
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Posted 27 March 2011 - 09:56 PM

I don't have to be gluten-free. My daugher does. For the most part I do eat gluten-free along with her but once in a while I have my cereal or bread.

I was a vegetarian for many years. I loved the diet. LOVED it! But I kept getting anemia. So now I find I have to eat meat a couple of times a week. Otherwise most of my meals are still vegetarian.

My mom never made special meals for me. She did cook pretty plain foods. So I would just eat the vegetables and then if the meal wasn't vegetarian (she did cook some vegetarian meals) then I would just eat some cheese or nuts for protein.
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#13 Marie1976

 
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Posted 27 April 2011 - 10:06 PM

Don't know if you're still thinking about this but I thought I'd offer my two cents:

I have been a vegetarian for over 20 years and a vegan for about 10 years. I was recently diagnosed celiac and even though I'm having a tough time with the gluten free diet so far, I will never (willingly) eat meat again.

I am vegan for ethical reasons, but I've also learned that it's better for the environment and for your health to not eat animal products.

Becoming a vegetarian was easy for me. I never really liked meat that much. And it's pretty easy to tell what has meat in it and what doesn't.

Becoming a vegan was harder at first, because you really have to read the ingredients, but after a while even that is not such a big deal. I think everyone has their usual groceries they buy and recipes they make and after I learned how to cook good vegan food, I started buying the same stuff and making my favorite recipes. Once in a while I try a new recipe but usually I make the same stuff: tacos, veggie burgers, lasagna, stir fry, etc.

Of course now I have to overhaul all of that now that I'm gluten free so it's back to the drawing board... I'm mostly worried about eating out.

Anyway, that was more than two cents, good luck on your decision! :)
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#14 mbrookes

 
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Posted 16 May 2011 - 01:23 PM

My ancestors did not claw their way to the top of the food chain so I could eat twigs and leaves. The reason people get anemic when they don't eat meat is that our bodies are designed to eat a wide variety of foods, including meat, to fill our nutritional needs. I understand that many people do not agree with me, but that's all part of life.
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#15 sb2178

 
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Posted 16 May 2011 - 05:11 PM

I was raised vegetarian, and as an adult was almost entirely vegetarian (exceptions for some travel and fish). When I start having gluten issues I ended up adding meat back in-- first, to deal with the pre-dianosis anemia; second, because I was actually digesting lean meats when I wasn't digesting a whole lot else. After having regained some weight (was not happening on grains/veg/beans/nuts/chocolate based diet), I'm now back to being mostly vegetarian. In another month or two, I'll probably be entirely vegetarian and dairy-lite (pecorino romano...basically it) with the exception of some sustainably caught tuna and salmon.

I'm not a fan of gums in baking, though, so I depend on eggs there and will never be vegan.

It is very feasible, especially if you cook. Get something fortified with b-12 or take a supplement, and consider iron/calcium if they aren't too high in your diet. Especially while still in the "healing" range, extra nutrients are probably helpful. As always, consult your PCP/GP etc.

I'll also happily send links to blogs/recipe if you'd like them! Message me with the sorts of foods you like.
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2/2010 Malabsorption becomes dramatically noticable
3/2010 Negative IgA EMA; negative IgA TTG
4/2010 Negative biopsy
5/2010 Elimination diet; symptoms begin to resolve on gluten-free diet round two (10 days)
5/2010 Diagnosed gluten sensitive based on weakly positive repeat IgA & IgG TTGs and dietary response; decline capsule endoscopy.

Now, what to do about my cookbook in progress? Make it gluten-free?




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