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Gluten-Free And Irritable Bowel Syndrome


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#1 onehappylady

 
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Posted 21 March 2011 - 07:54 PM

I have been eating gluten-free for about six months, but continue to have stomach issues.I also have wheat, barley and oat allergies- in addition to a diagnosis of IBS. Now that I am gluten-free, what additional diet suggestions would you have for me in controlling my IBS symptoms. (I had thought my stomach pain, cramping was simply from my gluten-filled diet, but I'm still not better.) Anyone else with IBS?

Thanks!

Brittney
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#2 Evangeline

 
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Posted 22 March 2011 - 06:48 AM

My friend has had IBS for over 10 years. It was -really- bad. I suggested they go on a gluten-free diet which they did, but when they REALLY noticed an 80% improvement was when they stopped eating all corn and soy. Even traces of corn and soy affect them. They also cannot eat any legumes (including peanuts (peanuts are legumes, not nuts). This diet improved their overall health although they can tell there must be one another food that occasionally causes them digestive issues.

Keep a food diary. Eat VERY SIMPLE and try to find trends within your diet and your body's reaction.
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#3 mushroom

 
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Posted 22 March 2011 - 01:30 PM

You may be having issues with lactose because gluten destroys the area of the small intestine where lactase (which digests it) is made. Most celiacs are intolerant of lactose until they heal. While I know you are not diagnosed celiac you may still have these problems.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

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Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#4 gf_soph

 
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Posted 22 March 2011 - 05:08 PM

I have been eating gluten-free for about six months, but continue to have stomach issues.I also have wheat, barley and oat allergies- in addition to a diagnosis of IBS. Now that I am gluten-free, what additional diet suggestions would you have for me in controlling my IBS symptoms. (I had thought my stomach pain, cramping was simply from my gluten-filled diet, but I'm still not better.) Anyone else with IBS?

Thanks!

Brittney


I had a lot of ongoing gut problems after going gluten free (was 'diagnosed' with IBS), and the thing that has really helped me the is FODMAP diet. If you google it there are some good resources, but if you are thinking of giving the diet a go you should follow the guidelines from Monash University, as they scientifically test the levels in food.

Apart from some remaining problems with low appetite my system is working pretty much normally, which is such a relief after what I used to deal with.
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#5 onehappylady

 
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Posted 26 March 2011 - 05:31 PM

I had a lot of ongoing gut problems after going gluten free (was 'diagnosed' with IBS), and the thing that has really helped me the is FODMAP diet. If you google it there are some good resources, but if you are thinking of giving the diet a go you should follow the guidelines from Monash University, as they scientifically test the levels in food.

Apart from some remaining problems with low appetite my system is working pretty much normally, which is such a relief after what I used to deal with.



Is the FODMAP something that you would talk to a dietician or a physician about before starting?
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#6 gf_soph

 
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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:37 PM

Is the FODMAP something that you would talk to a dietician or a physician about before starting?


A dietician is the best sources, but they don't all know about it. You are most likely to find one in Australia, as that's where the fodmap research team is based.
If you can't, I have heard that the dietician practice of Sue Shepard can do skype consultations, I have heard of several people finding this very useful.

There are a lot of different lists and sources of information about fodmaps, but always trust information from Monash university and Sue Shepard above other sources, and they are the ones actually testing the levels in foods. Also, the yahoo group 'fructose malabsorption australia' is a great resource, and has access to research papers and food lists that are pretty up to date.
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