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Celiac Runner In Training For Marathon
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I am a runner, and run many races from 5ks to marathons. It has been a constant uphill battle since I cannot train with your average running 'groups' (ideal) bc of my health problems and schedule conflicts. For one, I am a fulltime student, mother, wife and stay busy so my schedule is constantly changing. I run when I CAN! That said, my body and my gut is always changing too! I can never count on it to just be NORMAL.

Despite living gluten free and having now turned my home into a completely gluten free home (I'm the only celiac here)... I still have issues. Seems to happen a lot when I run too. That adrenaline rush tends to send my gut into a frenzy.

Don't get me wrong; I LOVE RUNNING!

But what. is. going. on!!!!!!!!!

I need to figure this out especially for my longer runs.

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Sometimes some self deprecating humor can help... so here goes.

Before I was diagnosed with Celiac disease, I had the same issues with running. Thankfully, we get somewhat of a notice when the gut issues are about to hit or the "dam is about to give" but it usually is only about 15-30 seconds.

So, I used to run on the path on the beach in California. I know that sounds like the idea situation for running, just due to the fact that you're next to the ocean.

But, I had a method to my madness! The outdoor restrooms and changing rooms were only about 1/8 of a mile from each other. Should I have an "issue".... and did I EVER... I would dodge into the bathroom for a quick stop. Of course, it got better over the years.

I know this isn't a solution. But, at least it will make your feel like you're not the only one out there with this embarrassing issue.

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When I trained for half marathons last year, I went through the same thing. I was able to hold it, most of the time. Are you able to just not eat much of anything? Like a banana or a small bowl of oatmeal? I never ate much before I ran, and then had food ready for when I was finished. Just a thought.

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When I trained for half marathons last year, I went through the same thing. I was able to hold it, most of the time. Are you able to just not eat much of anything? Like a banana or a small bowl of oatmeal? I never ate much before I ran, and then had food ready for when I was finished. Just a thought.

I generally cannot eat prior to running anyway because it gives me cramps/side stitches... so I don't think that's the problem. I usually wait about 2 hours after I've eaten to run. And don't eat much in the day anyway. I'm a grazer during the day. But have larger meals after my workouts.

I feel like it's the adrenaline that causes the problems. It's not only my gut but also my bladder! I feel like my body cannot stop emptying!

During actual races I just focus and ignore it but in training, it's pretty annoying.

:angry:

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I read somewhere that exercise increases the permeability of the intestine. Sorry I didn't keep the reference. I trained for and did a mini marathon last summer. I found that training made me either have more symptoms, or notice the symptoms more. What worked for me was to decrease my gluten load more. I decreased the number of processed foods which I eat. They were already very low too. I am pretty much on a whole foods diet. I even watch out for naturally gluten free foods for contamination. I wash everything like crazy. I keep a food diary. I only add one new food a week. With new things, I eat a bit to see if I react, than I eat a whole bunch. If I don't react then, I figure it's safe for me to eat. Best wishes in your training.

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That's pretty common.

Are you able to find a good, meditative rhythm during your running or are you usually pushing your edge to get more distance/speed? You might try backing off on the prep right now, and find a groove so that you can release fewer stress hormones (one of which is adrenaline) and more relaxation hormones. It would be a different "type" of running (different mindset), but maybe it would give your body a better place for the moment?

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I am a runner, and run many races from 5ks to marathons. It has been a constant uphill battle since I cannot train with your average running 'groups' (ideal) bc of my health problems and schedule conflicts. For one, I am a fulltime student, mother, wife and stay busy so my schedule is constantly changing. I run when I CAN! That said, my body and my gut is always changing too! I can never count on it to just be NORMAL.

Despite living gluten free and having now turned my home into a completely gluten free home (I'm the only celiac here)... I still have issues. Seems to happen a lot when I run too. That adrenaline rush tends to send my gut into a frenzy.

Don't get me wrong; I LOVE RUNNING!

But what. is. going. on!!!!!!!!!

I need to figure this out especially for my longer runs.

If you have not, you might consider reading the book "Thrive" by Brendan Brazier. He is a professional triathlete and has won the world Ironman contest several times. His diet is vegan and gluten free. He stresses alkaline and nutrient dense foods, like Hemp Protein, amaranth, and buckwheat for example.

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I am a runner, and run many races from 5ks to marathons. It has been a constant uphill battle since I cannot train with your average running 'groups' (ideal) bc of my health problems and schedule conflicts. For one, I am a fulltime student, mother, wife and stay busy so my schedule is constantly changing. I run when I CAN! That said, my body and my gut is always changing too! I can never count on it to just be NORMAL.

Despite living gluten free and having now turned my home into a completely gluten free home (I'm the only celiac here)... I still have issues. Seems to happen a lot when I run too. That adrenaline rush tends to send my gut into a frenzy.

Don't get me wrong; I LOVE RUNNING!

But what. is. going. on!!!!!!!!!

I need to figure this out especially for my longer runs.

Also a runner here! smile.gif

I'm not a coeliac (but am gluten-free to support hubby & son) .... but have suffered from the same problem on long runs dry.gif

Not quite sussed it out..... I have a feeling it's related to how much I sweat??

The cramps seem to start after I've been sweating a while - and by that point I can barely tolerate water , let alone a sports drink or gel GAH!!

I do try to keep it really light in the morning of a long run (1/2 banana, 1/2 cup redbush tea)

Sometimes I think it's all the 'jigging' about! unsure.gif

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