Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Vinegar...
0

15 posts in this topic

Does anyone else who is super sensitive have problems with vinegar (wishbone, ketchup..ect..) Because I really do think I do...if so, how do you guys do on Apple cider vinegar?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I do okay with apple cider vinegar as long as I stick with Heinz. I am okay with Heinz Ketchup, pickles, relish etc. If I eat any other brand of vinegar such as in a bbq sauce or other pickle brands, I will get sick.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had problems with all vinegars. Even apple cider vinegar was a problem. I make my own vinegar now. It's very easy. I just take Woodchuck cider and leave it out with a wire screen over the top for a couple months. It gets naturally fermented. Regular vinegar has fermenting agents added to it and their source might be a bit cc'ed, only enough for us super sensitives to worry about.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had problems with all vinegars. Even apple cider vinegar was a problem. I make my own vinegar now. It's very easy. I just take Woodchuck cider and leave it out with a wire screen over the top for a couple months. It gets naturally fermented. Regular vinegar has fermenting agents added to it and their source might be a bit cc'ed, only enough for us super sensitives to worry about.

Have you ever tried rice vinegar?

I think I'm having a problem with distilled white and maybe corn. I ate some salsa the other day and it really bothered me. When I called the company they said corn vinegar...

I still have to try apple cider vinegar yet...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was about 3 years ago, but I think I tried wine, rice, coconut, apple cider, and some other vinegars. They all got me, but I fine with homemade wine, pear, raspberry or apple cider vinegar.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




That was about 3 years ago, but I think I tried wine, rice, coconut, apple cider, and some other vinegars. They all got me, but I fine with homemade wine, pear, raspberry or apple cider vinegar.

Do you mind sharing how you make apple cide vinegar from scratch, it sound interesting to me!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ate some pickled herring recently and didn't feel well afterward. Thought it might be the vinegar. Has anyone else tried that?

I read that hydrolyzed wheat protein is used to "clarify" some wine, (and therefore, probably vinegar).

I can eat organic Paul Neuman vinegars, both red and balsamic.

Does anyone else who is super sensitive have problems with vinegar (wishbone, ketchup..ect..) Because I really do think I do...if so, how do you guys do on Apple cider vinegar?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Heinz Apple Cider Vinegar--never a problem with it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the US require the labelling of the type of vinegar contained in a product (I can't remember :P ) I get so disgusted here when the ingredients list just says "vinegar" because so much of our vinegar is malt vinegar - in fact I don't think my mom used any other kind. I had no idea that vinegar could be made from corn :o What a horrifying thought. :unsure:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that hydrolyzed wheat protein is used to "clarify" some wine, (and therefore, probably vinegar).

Would you kindly post that source? :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: wine. Here's just a couple studies on the feasibility of fining with plant proteins, but they mention it:

http://www.ajevonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/54/2/105

http://www.ajevonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/53/4/308

It sounds like hydrolyzed wheat might be in wine making now, since the mad cow disease scare, considering these studies are almost a decade old and were looking at the possibility.

EDIT: this vinyard mentions OTHERS using wheat as a fining agent, claiming that they don't do this themselves.

http://www.vinorganica.com/?tag=vegan

I've bombed out with all vinegars I've tried, too: coconut, grain-based, apple cider, rice - got sick on 'em all.

But on researching, I did find out that they all had yeast added. And I also found out that most yeast companies add corn starch, or other starches, to the yeast just before drying. Makes it easier to form it into yeast cakes and such. And that goes right into the vinegar, after distillation. <_< I suspect that may be where my problem lies, but I'm not certain.

Do you mind sharing how you make apple cider vinegar from scratch, it sound interesting to me!

There's a lot of different versions out there, but it's not too hard. Just take apple cider and put it in a well-washed glass or plastic (not metal) container, keep it out of the light for the most part, let it have an open top (with something on to keep the bugs out, like cheesecloth or mesh). It needs to be between 65-80 F, as I recall - I kept mine about 70-75 F. Mix it with your hand the first few days. It needs natural yeast and bacteria to help it ferment, and your hand is full of 'em. :-)

Then leave it there for a month or two. It should smell yeasty at first, and then start to smell sour. A 'mother' of vinegar forms on top, which is what should happen, so no worries.

At the end, just take out the mother of vinegar and store the vinegar in the fridge. You can pasteurize it and keep it in sterilized jars in the cupboard, but I didn't bother with that, myself. I wanted the probiotic properties preserved. Plus, I'm lazy, LOL.

You can do this from just juiced apples, too. It first turns to apple cider, then the vinegar, if you do the exact same procedure.

It doesn't always work every single time, but we had good luck our first try. Now I'm trying grapefruit vinegar.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: wine. Here's just a couple studies on the feasibility of fining with plant proteins, but they mention it:

http://www.ajevonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/54/2/105

http://www.ajevonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/53/4/308

It sounds like hydrolyzed wheat might be in wine making now, since the mad cow disease scare, considering these studies are almost a decade old and were looking at the possibility.

EDIT: this vinyard mentions OTHERS using wheat as a fining agent, claiming that they don't do this themselves.

http://www.vinorganica.com/?tag=vegan

I've bombed out with all vinegars I've tried, too: coconut, grain-based, apple cider, rice - got sick on 'em all.

But on researching, I did find out that they all had yeast added. And I also found out that most yeast companies add corn starch, or other starches, to the yeast just before drying. Makes it easier to form it into yeast cakes and such. And that goes right into the vinegar, after distillation. <_< I suspect that may be where my problem lies, but I'm not certain.

There's a lot of different versions out there, but it's not too hard. Just take apple cider and put it in a well-washed glass or plastic (not metal) container, keep it out of the light for the most part, let it have an open top (with something on to keep the bugs out, like cheesecloth or mesh). It needs to be between 65-80 F, as I recall - I kept mine about 70-75 F. Mix it with your hand the first few days. It needs natural yeast and bacteria to help it ferment, and your hand is full of 'em. :-)

Then leave it there for a month or two. It should smell yeasty at first, and then start to smell sour. A 'mother' of vinegar forms on top, which is what should happen, so no worries.

At the end, just take out the mother of vinegar and store the vinegar in the fridge. You can pasteurize it and keep it in sterilized jars in the cupboard, but I didn't bother with that, myself. I wanted the probiotic properties preserved. Plus, I'm lazy, LOL.

You can do this from just juiced apples, too. It first turns to apple cider, then the vinegar, if you do the exact same procedure.

It doesn't always work every single time, but we had good luck our first try. Now I'm trying grapefruit vinegar.

Wow...I think I'm going to try it....grapefruit vinegar huh...do you just use gapefruit juice and do the same?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just recently realized I'm extremely sensitive to wheat and am possibly celiac, but..

I've noticed a lot of times when I have ketchup, I develop one or two small blisters or sores in the back (sides) of my mouth.

This does not happen with tomato sauce, though.

Also, I get blisters with at least a couple different kinds of medical tape. (they're bad ones, too) And my skin turns different colors from that.

(just thought the blister thing was related)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow...I think I'm going to try it....grapefruit vinegar huh...do you just use gapefruit juice and do the same?

Sorry I missed this!

Actually, I made it from a 'food scraps vinegar' recipe on-line. Usually, you use the grapefruit peels and add a little juice and sugar and water. I can't do the sugar, so I added more of the juice - we'll see if it works. The sugar is an important part of the vinegar, for a food source. For the apple cider vinegar, I even understand that winter/fall apple varieties make better vinegar, because they are higher in natural sugars. I'm not sure if my fruit scrap vinegar actually turned out - it was faltering the last I looked, so I'm thinking I'll have to find a sugar source somehow, if I want it to work. :-(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone else who is super sensitive have problems with vinegar (wishbone, ketchup..ect..) Because I really do think I do...if so, how do you guys do on Apple cider vinegar?

Hi there,

Just thought i'd share my info. This may be a no duh but not all ketchup is gluten free, gotta be careful with some of the lesser brands, I seem to be okay with heinz. Also I'm a big fan of pickles, I found a brand at wholefoods "Bubbies" they are pretty delicious and they do not use vinegar they use citric acid. I do not know if citric acid could be used as a replacement for vinegar in general?

hope this was helpful :-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0