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My First Time Here - Gluten Intolerance And Low Iron
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29 posts in this topic

I can emphatically write to you that the gut is the 'seat of the emotions'.

Emotional insensitivity and emotional problems,

are closely linked to gut issues.

The so-called 'celiac disease', and i think most people here can agree it is a body rejection of gluten,

causing destruction of the small intestine,

creates emotionally hyperstimulation conditions,

which in turn reduce one's real sensitivity.

There are some diet-related things, for instance,

I totally disagree with restricting iodine in the diet:

this is one red-herring so-far.

Liquid iodine, iodine solution in water (pure), is absorbed directly through the mucus linings of the mouth,

and never reaches the gut. Plus it has an extremely beneficial effect, so this is why the mainstream death-oriented/worshipping players,

push breads (gluten, destroy the gut) and anti-iodines (fluorines, bromines, and an iodine deficient diet: destroy the thyroid, and fertility).

We get our iodine at about 50USD per liter. It's not expensive. Sea vegetables could potentially be a good source.

Apart from that, fasting.

Have you tried fasting, or fasting coupled with a mono-diet for awhile?

Such as mineral water, raw eggs [organic, bio-dynamic] with bananas and a few other things,

this to give the gut a break from serious digestion and also provide nutrients?

Only after less than two weeks, the improvement is clear, after 20 years not knowing this was one issue i was dealing with.

All the other techniques, learned over time, have allowed the healing process to accelerate much more quickly.

Without them, it may have taken me much more time.

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AussieAmanda,

Two things that you should know: First, what you've been told about breast cancer not hurting is simply not true. I speak from experience when I say that my breast cancer DID hurt. It's a fallacy that actually doctors continue to perpetuate--several doctors told me that breast cancer isn't painful. However, depending on the type, it can definitely hurt.

Secondly, once you go gluten free, your body is now able to absorb hormones better. If, by any chance, you have a small cluster of breast cancer cells in one of your breasts that occurred because of low iron levels, once your body is able to absorb hormones, they can feed the cancer...and it can grow quickly. I'm not tell you this to scare you--I've mentioned it in previous threads, and I'm mentioning it again now because it bears repeating. I had read this very information in a newsletter sent to me by the Gluten Intolerance Group just a few months before I was diagnosed with breast cancer, and it was at the urging of the article that I began to really pay attention to the pain in my breast. The pain, in conjunction with my cat's odd behavior, convinced me to insist that my healthcare provider check more closely for breast cancer, since my mammogram had been negative. Thankfully, the cancer was found in time. If you have any concerns about your breasts, please get an MRI or an ultrasound.

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AussieAmanda wrote: ...once your body is able to absorb hormones, they can feed the cancer...and it can grow quickly".

This isn't right Amanda. Cancers don't feed on (or even use) hormones.

Cancers (most at least) thrive on glucose, which is why a ketogenic

diet can be so succesful as part of cancer treatments. The body fuels itself

on ketones (from a high fat, high protein, VERY low carb diet) and the

abscence of glucose literraly starve the cancer cells.

Hormones have nothing to do with cancer cell growth - (unless we're

talking about insulin resistance and the ensuing chronicallly high blood

sugar) but leaving out gluten (and the associated crapohydrates) can

be a good start towards reducing your odds of getting cancer!

Cheers,

BW

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This isn't right Amanda. Cancers don't feed on (or even use) hormones.

Cancers (most at least) thrive on glucose, which is why a ketogenic

diet can be so succesful as part of cancer treatments. The body fuels itself

on ketones (from a high fat, high protein, VERY low carb diet) and the

abscence of glucose literraly starve the cancer cells.

Hormones have nothing to do with cancer cell growth - (unless we're

talking about insulin resistance and the ensuing chronicallly high blood

sugar) but leaving out gluten (and the associated crapohydrates) can

be a good start towards reducing your odds of getting cancer!

Cheers,

BW

Just so you know, you are replying to an old thread and the OP has not been on site since July 2011 and may not see your reply.

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