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My First Time Here - Gluten Intolerance And Low Iron


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28 replies to this topic

#16 AussieAmanda

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 01:09 AM

Can anyone tell me how long it would take for symptoms to disappear once going exclusively gluten free?
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#17 etta694

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 05:40 AM

That's a mystery.. I think everyone is different...
a guess - the sicker you've been - the longer the healing (?) My symptoms displayed problematically for 6 yrs. My symptoms resolved in a matter of months.. but if you don't find all of your food reactions or you are unknowingly ingesting gluten.. there are so many variables.
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Anemia and IBS through my life
2005 Joint pain, exhaustion, general feeling of not being well 2006 Beginning of testing for everything but Celiac 2008 Bloating, more muscle stiffness, feeling sicker, more exhausted-testing 'normal' 2010 March insides begin to shut down, cough that won't go away 2010 June Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, biopsy - all show no problems
Self diagnosed gluten intolerant - went gluten free. Within 3 days feeling better.
After 5 days - insides began to move
Now - feel better than I have felt for 15 years (except when I gluten myself.. which I'm good at)

#18 gf_soph

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 08:32 PM

The iphone app sounds really good, I'll look into that. I have downloaded some of the free apps but I'm quite happy to pay for one too as its likely to be updated better than a book would. Not sure if I've heard of crust pizzas. Domino's does a gluten free pizza, wonder how careful they are. I didn't realise you are an Aussie too (apart from the avatar!).


It may be that crust hasn't reached you yet. Check it out at http://new.crust.com.au/stores and see! Dominoes advertise in the celiac society magazine, but I'm a little dubious about it myself. Perhaps go in to your local store on a quiet day and ask them what procedures they have to avoid cross contamination, because that's what I'd be concerned about. Eating out becomes a bit of a judgement call sometimes, but I seem to be on the highly sensitive end.

The ingredient booklet is great as it lists a high number of ingredients and their gluten status, including a couple that are derived from wheat but safe to eat (e.g. wheat glucose syrup). It also have an overview about how to read labels, which is handy when you get confused.

My pic is actually of a pair of cockatoos that used to visit my house every afternoon, they are such beautiful birds. Gotta love Aussie wildlife :)
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#19 AussieAmanda

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 06:44 AM

I am totally amazed. I have had really tender breasts over the last few months, esp right before my pd is due. Anyway, went to the Dr last month and told her about it, also mentioned that I'd had light headedness, an episode of zig zag vision and an interrupted pd the previous month. She decided that after me being on my pill for 15 years that 'maybe the level of estrogen is too strong for your body now'. I asked if I could be having perimenopause as my Mum also started at my age (36) and she said no because I'm on the pill. She gave me a lower dosage estrogen pill instead which I've noticed has helped a tiny bit this month BUT I still have really tender breasts. I keep checking them as my greatest fear is cancer, even though I've been told that you don't have pain with breast cancer. I can find glands on each side that are the same but are sore, it was the same as a few years ago when I had them checked by a Dr.
Now I read on these forums that going gluten free can cause breast tenderness! My Dr never picked up on this, I don't think she knows much about gluten at all.
I wonder if its simply my hormones levelling. I have also wondered about adrenal fatigue and gluten as I know that the stress hormone being over released can cause a disruption and I have had that chronic stress for the last year.
I am amazed at how many symptoms that I've had can be explained by either eating gluten or being gluten free. My Dr has ruled out most other things and then says its 'anxiety' or 'we can't explain it'.
Hmmmmm
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#20 xabbar

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 06:53 AM

I have been reading up on GERD symptoms which I seem to have (tight chest, lump in the throat sensation). What I've read is that the GERD often disappears after going gluten-free. My symptoms have come since going gluten-free (around 4-5 months in). I was wondering, do you think that my body becoming more sensitive to ANY gluten could cause me to get reflux reactions to it? Its making more and more sense to me that most of the symptoms I've had are related to the IBS induced gluten-free diet. I don't mean in a bad way but simply that I need to go totally exclusive as my body has become more sensitive to gluten. Does this sound right. Here's the list of symptoms I've experienced in the last 6-12 months:

-Heart palpatations (strong enough to have a monitor on for 7 days, finding an abnormality but not life threatening)
- panic/anxiety/depression
- breast soreness
- back issues
- IBS
- Some shooting pains in the legs/Sciatica
- Muscle spasms
- tingling and numbness from pinched nerves/tense muscles
- facial burning/hot and cold sensations on one side that was bad and then decreased to almost totally gone
- Jaw soreness (TMD from jaw clenching) leading to teeth sensitivity
- Vision zig zags, three 2-5 minute episodes over a 6 month period (once sending me to the ER as I was terrified)

I believe I have slight TMD (from jaw clenching from stress), IBS (gone gluten and lactose free), low iron, hormonal fluctuations and maybe GERD.

As I said, all of this is from a period of chronic stress.

Can anyone join the dots so to speak and tell me if things look like they are connected to one thing?


Hi Amanda,

I realise your post is a few months old but was interested that a lot of symptoms have begun since you went gluten free.

All the advice you have been given is very relevant - I went gluten-free over 2 years ago and felt great for a while only to start getting bad reflux again (tight chest, something in throat etc.) after about 1 1/2 years. It was very depressing as I had been feeling so good, but it led to me giving Enterolab a try - they test for many food intolerances via your stool. I live in the Caribbean and was able to order the test and send it back from here overnight. The interesting thing is that I have discovered I am also intolerant to dairy, soy, egg and oats - many gluten intolerant/sensitive people have a hard time with these foods also, it is very very common. I cut out all of these and my symptoms have pretty much cleared up. Because dairy doesn't affect me as much as gluten, I sometimes have milk in my tea, but I definitely feel it the next day with mild acid reflux and sometimes headaches. Once you clear your body of these foods it does become much more sensitive.

By the way, you can be gluten sensitive and not have celiac disease. The harm to the body and symptoms are the same though. Dr Fasano at the Center for Celiac Disease Research at the University of Maryland has recently published very interesting information regarding this.

Hope you are feeling better and good luck - it can be a long road full of self diagnosis and research but definitely worth the effort.


P.S. Not sure if they have enterolab type testing in Australia - but I highly recommend it
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#21 Jsmacks13

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 04:58 PM

My iron is always too low even though I really think I have it under control. :(
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#22 peeptoad

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 04:39 AM

My iron is always too low even though I really think I have it under control. :(


I'm in the same boat... been taking iron supps for over 2 years, plus I reverted back to eating meat from a vegetarian diet. My ferritin won't budge. I just went gluten free a couple of months ago, so I'm hoping that helps in terms of absorption.
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#23 astrologer50

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 02:20 PM

I am totally amazed. I have had really tender breasts over the last few months, esp right before my pd is due. Anyway, went to the Dr last month and told her about it, also mentioned that I'd had light headedness, an episode of zig zag vision and an interrupted pd the previous month. She decided that after me being on my pill for 15 years that 'maybe the level of estrogen is too strong for your body now'. I asked if I could be having perimenopause as my Mum also started at my age (36) and she said no because I'm on the pill. She gave me a lower dosage estrogen pill instead which I've noticed has helped a tiny bit this month BUT I still have really tender breasts.

I had early menopause at age 45/46 due to early hystorectomy. But prior/perimenopause had very very sore/ tender nipples (not whole breat though) every now and then looking back this was my body telling me something but my GP never picked up on this. I was given anti biotics thinking I had some kind of infection
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#24 astrologer50

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 02:24 PM

I'm in the same boat... been taking iron supps for over 2 years, plus I reverted back to eating meat from a vegetarian diet. My ferritin won't budge. I just went gluten free a couple of months ago, so I'm hoping that helps in terms of absorption.


Why haven't they tried to find out what is making you anemic? isn't it connected to the red cells and bone marrow depletion...
I'm going to see gastroenterology consultant tomorrow and my GP wants to investigate what has made me anemic, whether it's celiac or to do a biopsy, camera jobbie
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#25 peeptoad

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 12:30 PM

Why haven't they tried to find out what is making you anemic? isn't it connected to the red cells and bone marrow depletion...
I'm going to see gastroenterology consultant tomorrow and my GP wants to investigate what has made me anemic, whether it's celiac or to do a biopsy, camera jobbie


No idea why my doc didn't investigate the cause for anemia. Pretty much everything I've done for my health in the last year has had nothing to do with my doctor anyway. I DXed myself with a gluten sensitivity (possible celiac since I never got the biopsy done- another story) via elimination/challenge. Going off gluten completely solved my GI problems, and in the last 2 months I've upped my iron supplements. Just got the ferritin re-checked 2 weeks ago, and it is rising slowly now.
My guess is going gluten-free is aiding in absorption, plus I may not have been taking enough to begin with. I actually told my doctor that, instead of the reverse happening....whatever.
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#26 totalallergyman

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 03:25 AM

I can emphatically write to you that the gut is the 'seat of the emotions'.
Emotional insensitivity and emotional problems,
are closely linked to gut issues.
The so-called 'celiac disease', and i think most people here can agree it is a body rejection of gluten,
causing destruction of the small intestine,
creates emotionally hyperstimulation conditions,
which in turn reduce one's real sensitivity.

There are some diet-related things, for instance,
I totally disagree with restricting iodine in the diet:
this is one red-herring so-far.
Liquid iodine, iodine solution in water (pure), is absorbed directly through the mucus linings of the mouth,
and never reaches the gut. Plus it has an extremely beneficial effect, so this is why the mainstream death-oriented/worshipping players,
push breads (gluten, destroy the gut) and anti-iodines (fluorines, bromines, and an iodine deficient diet: destroy the thyroid, and fertility).
We get our iodine at about 50USD per liter. It's not expensive. Sea vegetables could potentially be a good source.


Apart from that, fasting.

Have you tried fasting, or fasting coupled with a mono-diet for awhile?
Such as mineral water, raw eggs [organic, bio-dynamic] with bananas and a few other things,
this to give the gut a break from serious digestion and also provide nutrients?

Only after less than two weeks, the improvement is clear, after 20 years not knowing this was one issue i was dealing with.
All the other techniques, learned over time, have allowed the healing process to accelerate much more quickly.
Without them, it may have taken me much more time.
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#27 rosetapper23

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 08:10 PM

AussieAmanda,

Two things that you should know: First, what you've been told about breast cancer not hurting is simply not true. I speak from experience when I say that my breast cancer DID hurt. It's a fallacy that actually doctors continue to perpetuate--several doctors told me that breast cancer isn't painful. However, depending on the type, it can definitely hurt.

Secondly, once you go gluten free, your body is now able to absorb hormones better. If, by any chance, you have a small cluster of breast cancer cells in one of your breasts that occurred because of low iron levels, once your body is able to absorb hormones, they can feed the cancer...and it can grow quickly. I'm not tell you this to scare you--I've mentioned it in previous threads, and I'm mentioning it again now because it bears repeating. I had read this very information in a newsletter sent to me by the Gluten Intolerance Group just a few months before I was diagnosed with breast cancer, and it was at the urging of the article that I began to really pay attention to the pain in my breast. The pain, in conjunction with my cat's odd behavior, convinced me to insist that my healthcare provider check more closely for breast cancer, since my mammogram had been negative. Thankfully, the cancer was found in time. If you have any concerns about your breasts, please get an MRI or an ultrasound.
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#28 beefwalker

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 02:48 PM

AussieAmanda wrote: ...once your body is able to absorb hormones, they can feed the cancer...and it can grow quickly".


This isn't right Amanda. Cancers don't feed on (or even use) hormones.
Cancers (most at least) thrive on glucose, which is why a ketogenic
diet can be so succesful as part of cancer treatments. The body fuels itself
on ketones (from a high fat, high protein, VERY low carb diet) and the
abscence of glucose literraly starve the cancer cells.

Hormones have nothing to do with cancer cell growth - (unless we're
talking about insulin resistance and the ensuing chronicallly high blood
sugar) but leaving out gluten (and the associated crapohydrates) can
be a good start towards reducing your odds of getting cancer!
Cheers,
BW
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#29 IrishHeart

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 05:22 PM

This isn't right Amanda. Cancers don't feed on (or even use) hormones.
Cancers (most at least) thrive on glucose, which is why a ketogenic
diet can be so succesful as part of cancer treatments. The body fuels itself
on ketones (from a high fat, high protein, VERY low carb diet) and the
abscence of glucose literraly starve the cancer cells.

Hormones have nothing to do with cancer cell growth - (unless we're
talking about insulin resistance and the ensuing chronicallly high blood
sugar) but leaving out gluten (and the associated crapohydrates) can
be a good start towards reducing your odds of getting cancer!
Cheers,
BW


Just so you know, you are replying to an old thread and the OP has not been on site since July 2011 and may not see your reply.
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