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First Time Since Diagnosis Glutened?


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#1 Karla01

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 10:44 AM

Help was glutened for the first time since I went gluten free in August 2010. The only thing I added to my diet was UDI's white bread, has anyone else had a reaction, or any idea what I could have reacted to? Maybe I am missing a cross contamination somewhere.
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#2 txplowgirl

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 12:45 PM

Hi Karla, some of us can't eat the gluten free foods because of other food intolerances. I can't eat Udi's bread because of the potato starch. Some react to the xantham gum and some react to the low level of gluten in the bread. All so called gluten free packaged foods still have low levels of gluten in them. If you eat a lot of gluten free foods sooner or later it has a cumulative effect.
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#3 GlutenFreeManna

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 01:31 PM

Hi Karla, some of us can't eat the gluten free foods because of other food intolerances. I can't eat Udi's bread because of the potato starch. Some react to the xantham gum and some react to the low level of gluten in the bread. All so called gluten free packaged foods still have low levels of gluten in them. If you eat a lot of gluten free foods sooner or later it has a cumulative effect.


Tx Plox girl I know you have been around for a while but I don't think it's very accurate to say that "all gluten-free packaged foods still have low levels of gluten in them..." The truth is we can't know for sure if they have small amounts of gluten because it's impossible to test for amounts smaller than 5 PPM. I am very, very sensitive to cc, but for the most part I trust companies that make only gluten-free items in only gluten-free dedicated facilities. I don't think they are intentionally adding 2 PPM of gltuen and calling it gluten-free or doing other risky things when it comes to processing.


Now to the OP--did you toast Udi's in a toaster previously used for gluten? Some people do react to other ingredients in Udi's but that doesn't mena it has gluten in it.
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#4 Karla01

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 02:05 PM

Thank you both, no I have my own toaster, actually looked after I got sick to make sure it was the right one. Maybe something in the bread, I haven't really eaten any bread because I didn't like the way any of it tasted. It sure is strange though got sick yesterday after eating it and today. Guess we wont try for a third.
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#5 GlutenFreeManna

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 02:56 PM

Thank you both, no I have my own toaster, actually looked after I got sick to make sure it was the right one. Maybe something in the bread, I haven't really eaten any bread because I didn't like the way any of it tasted. It sure is strange though got sick yesterday after eating it and today. Guess we wont try for a third.


There have been a few threads on here where other people reported reacting to Udi's so you are not the only one that has a problem with it. It could be anything from the Xathan gum to one of the "dough conditioners" they use. Especially since you said you have not eaten much gluten-free bread before there's a good chance you have an intolerance to one of the other ingredients. I would drop it if I had a problem with it too. Smart choice!
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#6 T.H.

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 12:21 AM

The truth is we can't know for sure if they have small amounts of gluten because it's impossible to test for amounts smaller than 5 PPM.


Actually, that's not quite true. There's a new test out now by a company called neogen that can test down to 2ppm.

And while I have not tested a lot of products at home with gluten kits, between myself and others I know who do test, it's been really, really, REALLY rare that a processed food has not tested positive with at least a trace of gluten.

Heck, even unprocessed stuff sometimes tests positive when you'd never expect it. Like the outside of an orange or unprocessed (but still handled) seaweed (both 5ppm).


I don't believe stating that gluten free foods contain low levels of gluten is inaccurate, nor unfair to the company. It's not that companies aren't careful - I've called up companies and talked at length with them about some of the ways in which they take care to keep gluten from their food, but there is only so much care they can take. They cannot control every aspect of our society and frankly, Gluten is pretty ubiquitous. It's an ingredient in soaps, a contaminant in pre-emergents, on the hands of field hands that pick the food, in paper products, on coatings and sprays and mulches and...the list just goes on and on. It's in construction materials, so can even be in the building materials used to build the silos to store our food on the farm before shipping. Heck, Ford is adding wheat (and soy) to plastics for the insides of some of our cars, now, to make them more 'green.'

It is nearly impossible to have a food go from field to store without coming into contact with gluten somewhere. Yes, the amount of gluten is itty bitty. Most celiacs are just fine, although not all. But 'low' doesn't mean it doesn't exist, and looking at how many points of contact a food has that might overlap with gluten cc? The odds are in favor of gluten contamination rather than against it.
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#7 dilettantesteph

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 04:18 AM

I had to give up eating processed grain containing foods because of apparent gluten reactions. I started buying my grains whole and sorting them. I have found gluten grains in just about all samples. It has taken a lot of sorting, but ppm means parts per million and a million grains is a lot to look through.

Since I highly doubt that companies which sell gluten free food will go to the trouble to sort their grains one by one and remove gluten grains before grinding them to flour, it is easy for me to see how gluten gets into these products. I also wash my whole grains in case there are any tiny particles containing gluten on them. Then they tend to be safer for me to eat.

You were wise to add a new item carefully and watch for a reaction. That is a good way for super sensitives to find safe foods to eat.
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#8 padma

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 02:41 PM

I had to give up eating processed grain containing foods because of apparent gluten reactions. I started buying my grains whole and sorting them. I have found gluten grains in just about all samples. It has taken a lot of sorting, but ppm means parts per million and a million grains is a lot to look through.

Since I highly doubt that companies which sell gluten free food will go to the trouble to sort their grains one by one and remove gluten grains before grinding them to flour, it is easy for me to see how gluten gets into these products. I also wash my whole grains in case there are any tiny particles containing gluten on them. Then they tend to be safer for me to eat.

You were wise to add a new item carefully and watch for a reaction. That is a good way for super sensitives to find safe foods to eat.



I have seen you post this before and it has been very helpful to my understanding. The other day I was trying to imagine how much volume a million grains are. Anyone have an idea?

As far as Udi's is concerned, I tried it when it came out. I was thrilled with the way it tasted and how it felt more like real bread. Unfortunately, I can not eat it. After a few days I was ill. I have given most of them up now and am adding one at a time to test them. I was trying it every 4 days, but now am spreading it out more to at least a week, that way I can tell for sure what my reaction is.

In response to the "you could be reacting to other ingredients": Yes, it is true and possible. Most of us have a specific reaction to gluten that is different than allergies. I know I do. The kind of pain I get is specific. It is piercing and has sent me to the hospital a few times. For at least 8 years I ate gluten-free food with no problems and then I ate some Food for Life rice bread and got really ill. That particular day I had only eaten 3 things and it was the only potentially gluten food.I called all 3 companies to confirm. The FFL company was very polite and said they had not ever had a report of gluten in their food, but they sent me a FedEx bag to test the bread. I never heard back from them. I have tried their bread since and still react, so something has changed. Sad for me after eating that brand for so many years.

When Udi's came out I was excited to find something new. Unfortunately, I don't tolerate it, so back to organic whole brown rice that has been washed well and sorted. It is delicious.
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#9 WinterSong

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Posted 21 May 2011 - 03:36 AM

I think I'm having a reaction to Udi's, too. I recently made my own bread and felt great when I ate that. I ran out and switched back to Udi's. Nothing else in my diet has changed, but I get some stomach gurgles and my BMs instantly changed.

I've used xanthan gum in cookies and was fine with it, and I tolerate baked sweet potatoes just fine, so I don't think it's the potato starch. :unsure:

Not sure what's doing it, but I'm going to continue making my own bread as much as I can and use the Udi's in my freezer as an occasional back up.
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Diagnosed with IBS - Fall 2007

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Gluten free as of March 25th, 2011 and going strong!

Positive biopsy April 1st, 2011

 

Blood test results back down to normal levels November 2012


#10 padma

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 01:20 AM

I think I'm having a reaction to Udi's, too. I recently made my own bread and felt great when I ate that. I ran out and switched back to Udi's. Nothing else in my diet has changed, but I get some stomach gurgles and my BMs instantly changed.

I've used xanthan gum in cookies and was fine with it, and I tolerate baked sweet potatoes just fine, so I don't think it's the potato starch. :unsure:

Not sure what's doing it, but I'm going to continue making my own bread as much as I can and use the Udi's in my freezer as an occasional back up.



Having been at this for 10 years, I no longer keep anything that could potentially gluten me for a back up. I got rid of anything I had a reaction to a few months ago, then have added only one thing a week to see if I react. If I don't have a reaction in one day, then I eat it again the next day, etc. Usually, if it is low in gluten, it might take a few days to end up in pain. If I am lucky, I have no reaction and that food is put on the OK to Eat list. At the moment that list is very short for products that are "gluten free". I need to start making my own bread. I use to do that years ago and then got lazy because there were brands I could safely eat. You inspire me.
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#11 mushroom

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 01:36 AM

I tolerate baked sweet potatoes just fine, so I don't think it's the potato starch. :unsure:


Sweet potatoes are not related to potatoes :blink: Potatoes are a nightshade, sweet potatoes are not. I eat sweet potatoes all the time - can't touch that other kind :( or anything with potato starch in it.

Kinda like wheat and buckwheat - different families :P
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#12 WinterSong

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 03:10 AM

Mushroom - Good to know, thanks for the info! Learning something new every day :) I actually ate white potatoes over the weekend and felt fine.

After doing some more thinking about it, I'm tending to think that it may be the xanthan gum (rather than CC or low levels of gluten) because of its supposed laxative effect. Though I don't remember the cookies bothering me, I only made them once. And I don't feel like I'm experiencing any other gluteny symptoms like I did when I know I was glutened.

padma - Thanks for the advice. Have fun making your bread! It's gonna be my project for Friday B)
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Diagnosed with IBS - Fall 2007

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Gluten free as of March 25th, 2011 and going strong!

Positive biopsy April 1st, 2011

 

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#13 Karla01

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 02:05 PM

Having been at this for 10 years, I no longer keep anything that could potentially gluten me for a back up. I got rid of anything I had a reaction to a few months ago, then have added only one thing a week to see if I react. If I don't have a reaction in one day, then I eat it again the next day, etc. Usually, if it is low in gluten, it might take a few days to end up in pain. If I am lucky, I have no reaction and that food is put on the OK to Eat list. At the moment that list is very short for products that are "gluten free". I need to start making my own bread. I use to do that years ago and then got lazy because there were brands I could safely eat. You inspire me.





I am hearing alot making homemade bread, I think I might look into that. Does everyone use a bread machine? and good recipes?
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#14 Marilyn R

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 05:02 PM

I am hearing alot making homemade bread, I think I might look into that. Does everyone use a bread machine? and good recipes?



I was feeling "off" today and I'm wondering if it was due to Udi's. It's the only palatable gluten-free bread I've found.

I have a good recipe for flatbread that I've posted before. It's 1 cup chickpea flour, 1/4 cup rice flour, 1 cup water. Mix until smooth. Add 1 tsp cumin, 1 tsp salt, 1 cup shredded zucchini (skin on). You can substitute part of the zucchini with shredded carrot and/or onion. Mix well.

Heat a griddle over medium high heat until hot.

Put 1/3 cup of your bread batter on the griddle and quickly spread it out thinly in a circular outward motion on the griddle using the back of a spoon. Let it cook for a minute or two, check to make sure it's well browned and flip it over.

Cook it on the otherside for a minute or so, and flip it again twice. Here's a U-Tube link...I freeze what I don't eat and have had everybody who tried it ask for the recipe, and they aren't gluten-free.


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#15 WinterSong

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 11:27 AM

Having been at this for 10 years, I no longer keep anything that could potentially gluten me for a back up. I got rid of anything I had a reaction to a few months ago, then have added only one thing a week to see if I react. If I don't have a reaction in one day, then I eat it again the next day, etc. Usually, if it is low in gluten, it might take a few days to end up in pain. If I am lucky, I have no reaction and that food is put on the OK to Eat list. At the moment that list is very short for products that are "gluten free". I need to start making my own bread. I use to do that years ago and then got lazy because there were brands I could safely eat. You inspire me.




Haha, so I kept having a reaction, and I've decided to just stop eating Udi's altogether. I baked two batches of bread this morning and am just going to stick with things I make myself that I know are safe. Maybe once I've healed a little more I'll try a piece again to see if I react, but right now it's not worth it. But my bread is way better than anything store bought anyway :D
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Diagnosed with IBS - Fall 2007

Diagnosed with Celiac via blood test (tTg off the charts) - March 18th, 2011

Gluten free as of March 25th, 2011 and going strong!

Positive biopsy April 1st, 2011

 

Blood test results back down to normal levels November 2012



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