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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Canada And Income Tax
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12 posts in this topic

I'm wondering what kind of financial assistance might be available to Canadians who have celiac. I've heard about keeping track of grocery receipts for income tax purposes, but is there any other form of financial assistance available? Someone told me about a one-time "grant" that they got???

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Found some info..

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs/ncm-tx/rtrn/cmpltng/ddctns/lns300-350/330/clc-eng.html

Incremental cost of Gluten-free (gluten-free) products, an eligible medical expense.

Persons who suffer from celiac disease (gluten intolerance) are entitled to claim the incremental costs associated with the purchase of gluten-free (gluten-free) products as a medical expense.

You do not qualify for the disability amount (line 316) based on the inordinate amount of time it takes to shop for or prepare gluten-free products.

and more............

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My husband is a chartered accountant and so knows a lot about this (and his wife has Celiac Disease!) - don't forget to get a letter from your doctor with your Celiac diagnosis in case it is requested by Revenue Canada. If you register with the Celiac Association you may get discounts at a few stores (I've heard of a couple in Alberta that offer 10% off with a card).

Etta's right - we certainly should be entitled to detective and shopping pay! ;)

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I had found this too and am already saving all the grocery receipts.

What I am wondering about though is how to calculate the price difference.. I mean, that would depend on where you would buy the gluten equivalent, right? I was planning to call Revenue Canada and ask them, but maybe someone here knows?

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I know what you mean. To compare a loaf of bread do you use the $2 loaf or the $5.50 loaf. I am planning on using the biggest difference. We could buy the cheap loaf if it wasn't made of wheat. I wouldn't bother phoning Revenue Canada you will likely not get someone who knows or get a different answer each time you call. It seems like a lot of paper work that they are hoping most people won't claim anyway.

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It is a major pain, and probably not worth it.

What you can claim is subject to the rule that your medical expenses must exceed 3% of your net income. The claim is made on line 330. Only the part that exceeds 3% can be deducted.

Click here to read about the documentation required.

You don't compare the price of a loaf of bread. You must calculate the price of a slice of bread, and only deduct the difference in price for those slices actually eaten by the celiac. You must keep track of any slices of gluten-free bread eaten by others in the household, as the extra cost of those slices is NOT a deductible medical expense. :(

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You don't compare the price of a loaf of bread. You must calculate the price of a slice of bread, and only deduct the difference in price for those slices actually eaten by the celiac. You must keep track of any slices of gluten-free bread eaten by others in the household, as the extra cost of those slices is NOT a deductible medical expense. :(

And how on earth are they going to prove who ate a slice of bread? Especially if you can prove gluten bread is bought for the non-celiacs?? Oh, Canada... you are a pain in my bum... I don't even qualify because I am "only" gluten intolerant and only proven through my own trial and error. At least I don't have THAT headache to deal with.

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Well, the truth is that you can't prove it. But if you keep detailed records of each time you buy a loaf and how many slices are eaten by you and the others, they will accept it if the numbers appear reasonable. If you have records that you bought 50 loaves of Wonder Bread that year, then they will probably accept that none or only a couple of slices of your Glutino bread were eaten by "them." If you only keep track of the gluten-free bread, in a household of 3, expect to get credit for only 33%. In other words, you need to keep every grocery bill in case of an audit.

Yeah, it sucks. And don't forget the 3% rule I mentioned above.

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It is a major pain, and probably not worth it.

What you can claim is subject to the rule that your medical expenses must exceed 3% of your net income. The claim is made on line 330. Only the part that exceeds 3% can be deducted.

Click here to read about the documentation required.

You don't compare the price of a loaf of bread. You must calculate the price of a slice of bread, and only deduct the difference in price for those slices actually eaten by the celiac. You must keep track of any slices of gluten-free bread eaten by others in the household, as the extra cost of those slices is NOT a deductible medical expense. :(

I live in Canada - at first I was happy to hear about this tax break, but now that I read more and more about it, it seems overly complicated and probably wouldn't even end up adding up to very much money back. "Probably not worth it"...indeed.

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When I was first diagnosed I created a spreadsheet to track all of my gluten-free purchases, prices, and comparative gluten food (I used the cheapest gluten food so as to get the biggest differential). But then I realized I made too much money to claim anything.

It might be worth if if you have other medical expenses and can just add the gluten-free expenses to it. Or if you make no money and buy a lot of gluten-free food. Though if you make no money its unlikely you could afford to buy a lot of gluten-free food! I think the Canadian Government just wanted to make it look like they were helping Celiacs when in reality no one can really claim anything.

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wow i didnt know it was this much work. And you have to keep the bills of the "normal" food, reallyyyy...

Has anyone else found a easier way to do this? I am a nursing student so i dont have lots of extra cash so any little bit back would help, but saying that being a nursing student i dont have the time to do all this.

Canada makes me think sometimes that they have their thinking process a little whacked up!!

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I'm not sure if all provinces have this, but in Ontario there is also the Special Diet Allowance but its only for people on social assistance. Its supposed to help with the extra costs of a special diet for certain medical conditions, including Celiac Disease. As of April 1, 2011, the monthly allowance for Celiac Disease is $97. You have to apply at an Ontario Works or Ontario Disability Support Program office.

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