Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Job Interview Concern


  • Please log in to reply

25 replies to this topic

#16 Austin Guy

 
Austin Guy

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 128 posts
 

Posted 25 May 2011 - 09:23 AM

As a person with HR experience, a potential employer cannot discriminate against anyone with a condition. It is absolutely fine to bring up your Celiac if you are comfortable with that. Call the restaurant in advance and ask about gluten free meals. Then order one at lunch and have a good interview.
  • 1

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant May 10, 2011 after going gluten free May 8.
Allergic to cat dander, salmon, nuts, lots of airborne pollens and mold.
Soy intolerance August 2011
Dairy and egg intolerance November 2011
Peanuts 2013
Titanium dioxide June, 2014

Bisphenol-A August, 2014.


Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 jenngolightly

 
jenngolightly

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 387 posts
 

Posted 25 May 2011 - 10:58 AM

As a person with HR experience, a potential employer cannot discriminate against anyone with a condition. It is absolutely fine to bring up your Celiac if you are comfortable with that. Call the restaurant in advance and ask about gluten free meals. Then order one at lunch and have a good interview.

I think this is true in theory, but I've been on committees where this doesn't play out. If two potential employees are similar in skills, any negative might weigh against one of them, whether it's against the law or not. However, if that person is clearly the best candidate, the rule is enforced.

We might think that Celiac is no big deal, but there are a lot of people who still find it a detriment. I found out that I have Celiac while working at my present job. I work with highly educated people (at a university), and I'm still treated with kid-gloves by my boss. I have mixed feelings about the original poster disclosing Celiac in the interview. On one hand, it's going to come out eventually and you might as well tell right away. On the other hand, put your best foot forward and convince them that you can do the job first without writing "I have special needs" on your forehead.
  • 0
Jenn
dx celiac 9/2007: gluten-free 9/2007
corn intolerant: corn-free 5/2010
nut allergy: nut-free 8/2010

#18 mbrookes

 
mbrookes

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 657 posts
 

Posted 25 May 2011 - 03:53 PM

Since you are highly unlikely to encounter rye or barley, just tell the server (like you probably always do) that you can't eat wheat or wheat products. Every one is by now used to people with food allergies and think nothing of it. The way you handle the whole thing may make a good impression. Don't make it sound like a disability, just matter of fact.
It is not a disability, and I wish people (yes, including some with Celiac)would stop treating it as such. Most of us live very normal lives and just eat carefully. (oops, I'm on my soapbox again)I am a very normal person who has to be careful what I eat. The fact that I have Celiac does not dominate my life.
  • 1

#19 srall

 
srall

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 528 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 04:26 AM

I think this is true in theory, but I've been on committees where this doesn't play out. If two potential employees are similar in skills, any negative might weigh against one of them, whether it's against the law or not. However, if that person is clearly the best candidate, the rule is enforced.

We might think that Celiac is no big deal, but there are a lot of people who still find it a detriment. I found out that I have Celiac while working at my present job. I work with highly educated people (at a university), and I'm still treated with kid-gloves by my boss. I have mixed feelings about the original poster disclosing Celiac in the interview. On one hand, it's going to come out eventually and you might as well tell right away. On the other hand, put your best foot forward and convince them that you can do the job first without writing "I have special needs" on your forehead.



I sort of agree. I have been on hiring committees where we have two equally qualified people and say one is a mom with young kids and the other is single with no ties, and guess who gets the job. Not legal, not fair, but I know it happens. I'd probably be reluctant to point out in a job interview that I had celiac if I was going to be required to take clients out a lot. I think I'd just try and get the job, then worry about things later. As for your lunch, (which has probably happened by now) I'd either order the safest thing on the menu, or go and order an iced tea and just say you really weren't hungry.
  • 0

#20 Korwyn

 
Korwyn

    Don't forget your towel!

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 602 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 08:15 AM

Since you are highly unlikely to encounter rye or barley, just tell the server (like you probably always do) that you can't eat wheat or wheat products.


Arrghh!!!! I disagree most strongly and vociferously! Barley malt is in many seasonings, dressings, vinegar, etc, etc. Restaurants serve rye bread all the time! We used to toast bread on the grill when we served it with soup! That type of thinking is dangerous for a known Celiac. I have other words I want to use but I'm being polite.

It is not a disability, and I wish people (yes, including some with Celiac)would stop treating it as such. Most of us live very normal lives and just eat carefully. (oops, I'm on my soapbox again)I am a very normal person who has to be careful what I eat. The fact that I have Celiac does not dominate my life.


I agree that it isn't a disability. It may not dominate your life, but are you going to say that it doesn't affect every aspect of your social and home life? I don't even allow our grandkids to bring snacks into the house when they come over. We have stuff there for them. I've gotten sick from crumbs that came in on Austyn's clothes after a 4 hour car ride from their house to ours. I got a sloppy kiss from Healey one time when they showed up and found out that he had been eating animal crackers the whole way there. You're going to tell me that you just have to be careful what you eat? Then you are MOST fortunate.
  • 0
Undiagnosed for 20 years since first symptoms.
March 2009 - Negative Blood work
April 24, 2009 - Gluten-free
April 29, 2009 - Notably positive response to gluten-free Diet.
May 2, 2009 Dairy Free
May 6, 2009, Soy Free
May 27, 2009 Enterolab Results: Positive Anti-gliadin IgA, tTG IgA, Casein, HLA DQ2.2, HLA DQ8
June 4, 2009 Refined sugar free (except Raw Honey, pure Maple syrup)
June 29, 2009, Dad diagnosed Celiac by GI specialist via blood work and dietary response.
July 2009, Dad's gene test: double DQ8! Thanks Dad - I'll try to get you something nice for Christmas! :)
August 8, 2009 Really Soy free this time - Thanks Blue Diamond for the soy lecithin in the almond milk! :(

#21 mbrookes

 
mbrookes

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 657 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 08:28 AM

I agree. I am MOST fortunate in that I am not super sensitive. Thank you for not using impolite words, but I think you are over-stating the prescence of barley in salad dressings. If it is a worry, ask for olive oil and lemon juice on the side.
Maybe I did not express myself well. I mean that our attitude is very important in our health and the way we are perceived. I am a person who happens to have Celiac disease. I am not Celiac disease who happens to be a person. Maybe I have been exposed to too many whiners.
  • 0

#22 Jestgar

 
Jestgar

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,755 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 08:39 AM

I would also say that I have to be careful with what I eat, but then I don't interact much with gluten eaters. I met my bf's granddaughter for the first time and I realized that I was reluctant to touch her because she had a sandwich in her hand. It made me realize that my ease of living is because I live within a carefully defined sphere. When I step out of that sphere is when I realize how careful I've learned to be, and the steps I've taken to make my life easier.
  • 0
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#23 GlutenFreeManna

 
GlutenFreeManna

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,887 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 09:27 AM

You may not think of yourself as disabled, but celiac disease (and food allergies too) is defined as a disability that is covered by the ADA. It is technically a disability no matter what your attitude or how well you manage it. You cannot just eat what everyone else is eating or just order something without asking questions. Some of us cannot even enter certain restaurants without getting sick. This is a fact of life for some of us and and not meant to be "whining". Consider yourself very lucky if you do not have bad reactions to cc and air-born flour. As to the OP, it is illegal for them to discriminate against someone for having celiac disease when hiring, but I do tend to agree with the other posters that said it may happen anyway. Proving discrimination is too difficult in a case like this. They can simply say the other person was more qualified. Better, IMO, to just avoid the topic until after you have the job, especially since it will not necessarily impact your ability to do the job. I hope you will update us with what you decided to do and how it turned out!
  • 0
A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#24 Chad Sines

 
Chad Sines

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 279 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 09:42 AM

If you will be required to eat out a lot for sales, then I think you MUST go to this. If you will not attend this most critical meal then he is going to wonder if you are reliable enough to attend them with a client.

I have never had any business associate or client give me any negatives about having an allergy to wheat (the term wheat is easier for them to understand). "Allergy to wheat?" "Yea, I used to be really sick before it was diagnosed but I am great now" Most either know someone with it, have heard about it or were curious about it. It has been a great ice breaker.

Would you hide if you had a seafood or peanut allergy?

You have to eat at your meals but you do not have to eat wheat. Like others said, you could just eat a salad if you want to keep it a secret. But if you do not let people know this you will offend them at some point when they invite you to a celiac unfriendly meal and you act "off."
  • 1

#25 a1956chill

 
a1956chill

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,365 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 02:08 PM

Jason did you go to the interview? How did it go?
  • 1

Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#26 aeraen

 
aeraen

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 112 posts
 

Posted 26 May 2011 - 02:25 PM

Have you considered turning it into a "positive"? When your waiter arrives, tell him politely, and without apology, that you are allergic to wheat, and then order a very simple meal (like others said, salad w/o croutons would be perfect) with confidence. Ask any questions you may have graciously, and explain any questions your waiter may have simply.

Do so with a minimum of fuss, and you will show your prospective employer that you are able to handle an awkward situation confidently and with grace.
  • 1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: