Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

For Future Referance,


  • Please log in to reply

13 replies to this topic

#1 Niebr

 
Niebr

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:09 PM

Alright, Ive been on this forum for a very short time, but in this time, I have seen many people here with multiple medical problems.
I am a very inquisitive person, yet due to my paranoid hypercondriact behavior + mind set. I am not sure if i want the answer to what I'm asking. (more or less scared of what may be to come)

Is it common to develop such a string of medical complications after becoming a Celiac, even if you eat properly?

Again I know I am making my own post redundant by saying I am not sure if I want to know, yet if you all feel like it is information I should know then its better now than later I assume.

Thank you. ^.^
  • 0

The only dumb question, is the one that remains unasked.


Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 GlutenFreeManna

 
GlutenFreeManna

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,887 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:33 PM

Yes and No. There are many diseases that are commonly associated with celiac. When and whether or not you develop these other diseases however will depend on many factors. People that go undiagnosed (and therefore are still consuming gluten) for a longer period of time have greater risk of developing cancer (although it is rare) and other autoimmune diseases. Genreally speaking if you get diagnosed early enough and stay strictly gluten-free your risk of developing cancer goes back down to the same risk-level of the general population. I'm not sure about the other autoimmune diseases because I think some of those you may develop just based on your genetics. If you have one autoimmune disease you are more likely to develop another. So some people may even get diagnosed with other auto-immune disease BEFORE finding out they have celiac disease and some people may get diagnosed with something else just after the celiac diagnosis. It's not really that either one causes the other (at least i don't think here are causal studies out there, someone please correct me if I'm wrong because I would love to read about that), it may just be that they are strongly associated and drs are better able to diagnose a second one once you've been diagnosed with the first one. My current dr, for example, was not at all surprised that I suspected celiac because I have hypothyroidism and hashimotos in my family history. I'm hoping that by being gluten free and soy free my chances of developing hypothyroidism decrease, but I can't do much about the fact that I am already borderline and my mom and grandmother have it.
  • 0
A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#3 Niebr

 
Niebr

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:39 PM

Alright well that is helpful, i have read about developing cancers if you do not stay gluten free, but i started losing weight at an alarming rate i knew something was wrong, the longest tiem i was eating gluten between not knowing and final diagnosis was . . . . maybe a month, if that ?

I am not sure what all I may actually have because no one in my mothers side is a Celiac, so i believe it was my my father who was possibly unknowingly celiac, (find medical records maybe?) ill have to look into it,
  • 0

The only dumb question, is the one that remains unasked.


#4 GlutenFreeManna

 
GlutenFreeManna

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,887 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 04:00 AM

Alright well that is helpful, i have read about developing cancers if you do not stay gluten free, but i started losing weight at an alarming rate i knew something was wrong, the longest tiem i was eating gluten between not knowing and final diagnosis was . . . . maybe a month, if that ?

I am not sure what all I may actually have because no one in my mothers side is a Celiac, so i believe it was my my father who was possibly unknowingly celiac, (find medical records maybe?) ill have to look into it,


Do you have a dr that is very knowledgeable about celiac? Your bigger concern right now is making sure you are absorbing all the vitamins you take in. You may want to ask your dr to test your vitamin and mineral levels--some common ones that we run low on are: Vitamin D, Vitamin B12, Iron, and calcium. If you have not been very sick for very long however you could be normal range on all of these and may not need anything. Some people really just have the celiac and nothing else. So don't freak out that you may suddenly have all these other disease. You could have gotten the genes for celiac from either parent or BOTH parents. About 30% of the population has the two most common celiac genes, but only about 1% of the population develops active celiac disease. Even if your mom has not been sick, she should be tested. Your, mom, dad and any siblings should know about your diagnosis so they can ask their dr for a blood test. And when you tell them it would be a good time to ask them about their medical history so you can know what your need to watch out for.
  • 0
A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#5 K8ling

 
K8ling

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 540 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 06:36 AM

I've been gluten-free for a year and I haven't developed any other problems. Everything has gotten much better for me.
  • 1
Diagnosed with Gluten Allergy April 2010. Family history of Celiac disease and bowel cancers. Already feeling a billion times better since going gluten free.

#6 psawyer

 
psawyer

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,048 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 09:01 AM

I am not sure what all I may actually have because no one in my mothers side is a Celiac, so i believe it was my my father who was possibly unknowingly celiac, (find medical records maybe?) ill have to look into it,

In the US, about 30% of the population have the genes commonly associated with celiac disease, but only about 1% of the population actually develop celiac disease.
  • 1
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#7 sb2178

 
sb2178

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 793 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 04:16 PM

I also vaguely think that people who have more complicated health problems are more likely to hang out here longer. (I don't have them, but an avid interest in nutrition & health.) They definitely have learned more, and may be more likely to reply. I think a fair number of people join, figure it out, struggle, get used to life, and then only pop on every now and then. Call it an educated guess, and maybe a couple of long-time users could comment too.
  • 1

2/2010 Malabsorption becomes dramatically noticable
3/2010 Negative IgA EMA; negative IgA TTG
4/2010 Negative biopsy
5/2010 Elimination diet; symptoms begin to resolve on gluten-free diet round two (10 days)
5/2010 Diagnosed gluten sensitive based on weakly positive repeat IgA & IgG TTGs and dietary response; decline capsule endoscopy.

Now, what to do about my cookbook in progress? Make it gluten-free?

#8 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 05:05 PM

I would agree that the newly diagnosed come on here, pick up a bunch of tips and support, get better, heal and go away. Those with problems linger. You will note that we have over 41,000 members; of those at any one time probably only about 2-300 are very active. Some of us stay around to help others out or to learn more from new posters. So I don't think you are looking at large numbers of people who remain incredibly sick.
  • 1
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#9 GFinDC

 
GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,134 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 05:14 PM

I think it is more common that people have many years of mis-diagnoses before celiac is identified. In those years their bodies are being damamged over and over, continually while they are not gluten-free. So that takes a tole and may lead to development of other diseases, including auto-imune disease. If you do a search on "celiac related condition" or "celiac associated condition", you can find lists of diseases that are more common in celiacs. There has to be a reason those disease are more common, but I don't think there is any proof what the cause is. IMHO a lot of it is immune system whackiness brought on by constant gluten exposure, but that is just my opinion.
  • 1
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#10 Judy3

 
Judy3

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 264 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 05:38 PM

I think it is more common that people have many years of mis-diagnoses before celiac is identified. In those years their bodies are being damamged over and over, continually while they are not gluten-free. So that takes a tole and may lead to development of other diseases, including auto-imune disease. If you do a search on "celiac related condition" or "celiac associated condition", you can find lists of diseases that are more common in celiacs. There has to be a reason those disease are more common, but I don't think there is any proof what the cause is. IMHO a lot of it is immune system whackiness brought on by constant gluten exposure, but that is just my opinion.




Agreed!!! From what I've read in my research, my opinion is the same as yours :)
  • 0
*Judy

Food allergies to fish, seafood, tree nuts, aspartame(Equal),flax seed, and many drugs
Stomach issues since childhood
Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) age 6-44
Diabetes age 44 to present now going back to Hypoglycemia since gluten free.
Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2005 and it's gone now that I'm aspartame and gluten free. Hmmm
Celiac disease- negative test in 2009, positive tests in Nov. 2010
Gluten free started 11/08/2010
Genetic tests positive- DQ2, positive -DQ6 (?) negative- DQ8 11/15/2010

#11 viviendoparajesus

 
viviendoparajesus

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 88 posts
 

Posted 02 June 2011 - 06:52 PM

A lot of health problems run in my family, but I was the first one to find out about the gluten intolerance. It seems to me that the unaddressed gluten intolerance made my family more susceptible to health problems. I went undiagnosed with gluten intolerance for many years and instead amassed a variety of other diagnoses. When I went off gluten, many of my health problems resolved. I think the previous posters brought up good points that newly diagnosed people and people who are still struggling are likely to reach out on forums such as this. I think there is also some validity to untreated celiac's causing or increasing the likelihood of other health problems since it keeps the immune system busy on gluten as opposed to real threats and it wears out the body with its constant attack on gluten and decreased ability to absorb the nutrients that are needed for health. I think some other health problems are associated with it because there is still a lot that is not known - effects of other allergies, dairy intolerance, role of soy, cross reactivity, safety of other grains. In addition, there are challenges of cross contamination and not even knowing all the little ridiculous sources of contamination. That would be great if you can find answers in your family medical history, but it could have gone undiagnosed. Even today celiac's is often misdiagnosed or not realized for years and it seems even less likely to have been recognized in previous generations. While we can guess a family member had celiac's it is hard to tell for sure, since many symptoms are similar for a variety of diseases. Some people have obvious digestive symptoms, but others have the damage without the obvious symptoms. Best wishes for good health and finding the answers you are looking for!
  • 1
Misdiagnosed - IBS, TMJ, eczema, KP, etc
Real Diagnosis - Gluten & Casein (milk protein) Intolerance, Cross Reactivity to Yeast & Buckwheat
Recommend: Tests: Entero Labs Gluten Sensitivity & Gene Testing
Books: * Allergies by Dr. Carolee Bateson-Koch (digestion, yeast, parasites, body pH...)
* Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms by Dr. Datis Kharrazian (gluten & autoimmune problems)
* Change Your Brain Change Your Life by Dr. Daniel Amen (foods, supplements...)
Supplements: * digestive enzymes, * probiotics (dairy free - Klaire Labs - Pro5)

#12 Niebr

 
Niebr

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
 

Posted 03 June 2011 - 12:05 AM

Well that is great to find out, cause i realized last night, i notcvied alot of gluten-free members had many other illnesses and i honestly was halfway to a panic attack thinking that i could be next due to it all, sadly i dont think i am able to find out more about it because my father i believe is the celiac, he mentioned something once about being lactose, yet he always drank living beer, so i dont know. i know my mom doesnt have it. she drinks constantly, and eats things ontaining gluten, and i see nothing of what she has, i was eating gluten items maybe 2-4 months prior to getting sick, and then being diagnosed, cause i kept hammering the hospitals and Drs offices while i had the medical insurance, and they finally diagnosed me within 2-4 months of it all starting, so i would say im going to be ok ?
  • 0

The only dumb question, is the one that remains unasked.


#13 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 03 June 2011 - 12:19 AM

There are no guarantees, but I would say you are one lucky dude for being diagnosed so early :D

ETA: My RA and psoriasis were the reason I went gluten free; they were not things that followed on after. I am probably one of the oldest here on the board so it took me a long while to get there. And my other food intolerances developed because I had such a leaky gut from gluten damage.

I would say your prognosis is good :D
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#14 lynnelise

 
lynnelise

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 474 posts
 

Posted 03 June 2011 - 06:41 AM

I agree with the other posters. No reason to panic. I think a lot of us were sick for so long and undiagnosed that constant gluten exposure caused other issues to set in. With you being diagnosed so soon I think you'll be just fine! I feel you though because I've always been panicky about my health too!
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: